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BruCru

Help the New Guy: Does anyone have a list of tools they keep on their boat

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BruCru

I am trying to put together a tool list and ultimately a tool box for the boat.  I already have a spare prop and a weekend saver kit from WakeMakers.  Just curious as what people keep on the their boats for managing issues on the lake.  So far as I can tell with 40 hours in my new 'Bu the majority of work so far required a Phillips head screwdriver (wakeboard bindings) and stuff to manage rope issues.   Love to see a list of what I might need going forward.  

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MalibuNation

:welcome:

Here's a start:

 

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Choiceind

I keep a socket set, some pliers, extra hose clamps and ballast fittings, teflon tape, 6 in 1 screwdriver, spare impeller with puller.Allen keys for mirror and wakeboard racks. And a first aid kit. A

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formulaben

I would definitely add self-fusing tape to the list. 

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oldjeep

Small socket set that has screwdriver and hex bits.

Spare prop and puller, wrench, nut, cotter

Spare impeller

Diacom on a small laptop with the needed cables.

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wdr

My 1st rule of the boat tool box, go cheap. 99% of everything I have in my Bass Pro, "waterproof" plastic tool box has been found on the road, in a parking lot or inherited from a divorce! Screw drivers #1 and #2 flat and Phillips head of various lengths. An Allen key for every size screw on the boat 3/32, 3/8 and 5/16 for the G3. The 3/32 works on all of the rudder Allen set screws and the board clamp screws and 1/4 for the rudder stuffing box and tracking fins screws. 1/4 and 5/16 nut driver handles work for all of the hose clamps on my '10. Ratchet with 3" extension and 1/4 to 5/8 sockets on a carrier. Any socket bigger and I probably have bigger issues to deal with that the big sockets wouldn't fix! Self sealing rescue tape for a blown hose. I actually used that stuff in combat on a radiator hose and it worked longer than it should have!? A role of electrical tape and 3, 5ft runs of 10, 12, and 16ga wire. Jumper cables, replacement impeller new in box, Hand full of hose clamps 1 1/2 and 2 inches. Regular pliers, wire cutter and needle nose pliers. A 3x3 mirror w/ case and I have used it to find a leak. Hand full of 8" zip ties, transom plugs, AA flash light and a Cresent wrench just in case the sockets won't work of if I need to throw something at someone, I hate Cresent wrenches!. Lastly it is known as 550 cord in my world or parachute cord elsewhere 50' and a pen gun flare kit I manage to hang on to when I retired from the military. And yes it will ALL fit, even the jumper cables if properly coiled. JM2C, Bill.

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MadMan

I keep a "free with coupon" Harbor Freight multi-meter onboard also.

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BruCru

MalibuNation, that is an amazing list, I guess I just didn't search for it properly.  I am trying to focus on the "basic tool set" part of that list.  I have box anchor and shore spike, the bigger stuff is easier to figure out but the small stuff in the little tool box is the issue.  Bozboat and wdr, I think between the list you have pointed me towards and the one listed I should be good, already have basic craftsman tool set with sockets, allens, and screwdrivers but the "other" stuff is what I was interested in... Thank you guys.  Good tip on the self fusing tape.  I will google Diacom but there is no way my Macbook Pro is ever gonna make it on the boat.  Lake is 185' deep under my hydro hoist and stuff has already gone to the bottom.

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RTS

Give some thought to what can go wrong when you are out and what you are comfortable fixing.  Then make sure you have the tools for those jobs.

In addition to a cheap West Marine plastic box tool kit, I made sure I had the tools to change my impeller and fuel pump.  I had a multimeter, electrical tape and an electrical wire tool.  I had tools to change my tires (esp one of those 'X' style lug nut wrenches) that I kept in the boat so I didn't leave it at home.  Spark Plug socket.  Transom plug wrench kept in glovebox (dedicated 5/8" wrench, I think) and extra brass plugs.  New in sealed package 'Rescue Tape'... I think that is the self fusing tape referred to above.  Two Monkey wrenches for adjusting shaft packing.

Theres really no sense in having tools on the boat to perform a job you can't do or are uncomfortable with.  So my advice is rather than have an extensive list of tools on the boat, spend some time thinking about what can go wrong that you yourself could fix, and start making your tool kit from that.

Edited by RTS

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oldjeep
7 hours ago, BruCru said:

MalibuNation, that is an amazing list, I guess I just didn't search for it properly.  I am trying to focus on the "basic tool set" part of that list.  I have box anchor and shore spike, the bigger stuff is easier to figure out but the small stuff in the little tool box is the issue.  Bozboat and wdr, I think between the list you have pointed me towards and the one listed I should be good, already have basic craftsman tool set with sockets, allens, and screwdrivers but the "other" stuff is what I was interested in... Thank you guys.  Good tip on the self fusing tape.  I will google Diacom but there is no way my Macbook Pro is ever gonna make it on the boat.  Lake is 185' deep under my hydro hoist and stuff has already gone to the bottom.

diacomm isn't something most folks have, it is on my boat because I own it and I've been having issues with a phantom code.   It is expensive and most folks wouldnt have use for it. I wouldn't let a mac on my boat either, however 185 ft of water seems like the best place for one ;)

Edited by oldjeep

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Kmfish87

First and foremost is a big first aid kit. People aren't replaceable, boats are.

Basic tool kit for me. Everything is cheap. $8 home depot plastic tool box, philips and flat screw drivers, cheap folding knife, assortment of pliers and adjustable wrenches, basic socket set and spark plug socket, spare impeller kit and housing, few feet of wire and some but connectors, couple quarts each of engine oil and trans fliud, spare fuel filter, etc. Need to add a few hose clamps.

The advice for only keeping tools for things that are in your skill set is good. Also no need to bring the whole garage with you, just be prepared to avoid the avoidable "weekend ending" issues that could arise.

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BruCru
2 hours ago, oldjeep said:

diacomm isn't something most folks have, it is on my boat because I own it and I've been having issues with a phantom code.   It is expensive and most folks wouldnt have use for it. I wouldn't let a mac on my boat either, however 185 ft of water seems like the best place for one ;)

It's little off topic but I love my mac, as a guy who once built custom PC's and has three teenage kids.  I spend a lot less time fixing Mac issues than PC issues on my home network.  But I am ambivalent on the topic and could easily live with either.  There are 4 Macs at our house and 4 PCs.  But I agree that if you don't like it... it should go to the bottom of the lake.

1 hour ago, Kmfish87 said:

First and foremost is a big first aid kit. People aren't replaceable, boats are.

Basic tool kit for me. Everything is cheap. $8 home depot plastic tool box, philips and flat screw drivers, cheap folding knife, assortment of pliers and adjustable wrenches, basic socket set and spark plug socket, spare impeller kit and housing, few feet of wire and some but connectors, couple quarts each of engine oil and trans fliud, spare fuel filter, etc. Need to add a few hose clamps.

The advice for only keeping tools for things that are in your skill set is good. Also no need to bring the whole garage with you, just be prepared to avoid the avoidable "weekend ending" issues that could arise.

Agreed, I have a Thomas Kit from SLC.  As a surgeon, I know how to use all the tools in the kit, the Diacomm is beyond my current skill set :)

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formulaben
4 hours ago, RTS said:

Give some thought to what can go wrong when you are out and what you are comfortable fixing.  Then make sure you have the tools for those jobs.

In addition to a cheap West Marine plastic box tool kit, I made sure I had the tools to change my impeller and fuel pump.  I had a multimeter, electrical tape and an electrical wire tool.  I had tools to change my tires (esp one of those 'X' style lug nut wrenches) that I kept in the boat so I didn't leave it at home.  Spark Plug socket.  Transom plug wrench kept in glovebox (dedicated 5/8" wrench, I think) and extra brass plugs.  New in sealed package 'Rescue Tape'... I think that is the self fusing tape referred to above.  Two Monkey wrenches for adjusting shaft packing.

Theres really no sense in having tools on the boat to perform a job you can't do or are uncomfortable with.  So my advice is rather than have an extensive list of tools on the boat, spend some time thinking about what can go wrong that you yourself could fix, and start making your tool kit from that.

Totally agree, but also consider that of all the times I've had to bust out the took it, the biggest job was for someone else...while you may not be comfortable the other party might and may need those tools.  I guess I'm a wannabe Boy Scout and I'm always over-prepared.

 

2 hours ago, Kmfish87 said:

First and foremost is a big first aid kit. People aren't replaceable, boats are.

Basic tool kit for me. Everything is cheap. $8 home depot plastic tool box, philips and flat screw drivers, cheap folding knife, assortment of pliers and adjustable wrenches, basic socket set and spark plug socket, spare impeller kit and housing, few feet of wire and some but connectors, couple quarts each of engine oil and trans fliud, spare fuel filter, etc. Need to add a few hose clamps.

The advice for only keeping tools for things that are in your skill set is good. Also no need to bring the whole garage with you, just be prepared to avoid the avoidable "weekend ending" issues that could arise.

Bigtime.  I can't imagine operating without a first aid kit on board.

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srab

Just curious, for you guys that have a first aid kit on board, but what does it have in it, and what have you ever used it for?

I'm not suggesting its not a good idea, but, at least in my experience, the first aid kits that I've run across typically have band-aids, bandages, some tape, maybe some moleskin, some Tylenol or aspirin, maybe some butterflies and antibiotic ointment.

Never had one of these on my boat.  Never yet seen an injury, while boating, when any of the above items would have made a real difference.  In my experience, the two most important first aid items are clean/bottled water and ice. 

Having said that, I'm rarely, if ever, more than about a 30 minute boat ride from my car. 

 

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oldjeep
5 minutes ago, srab said:

Just curious, for you guys that have a first aid kit on board, but what does it have in it, and what have you ever used it for?

I'm not suggesting its not a good idea, but, at least in my experience, the first aid kits that I've run across typically have band-aids, bandages, some tape, maybe some moleskin, some Tylenol or aspirin, maybe some butterflies and antibiotic ointment.

Never had one of these on my boat.  Never yet seen an injury, while boating, when any of the above items would have made a real difference.  In my experience, the two most important first aid items are clean/bottled water and ice. 

Having said that, I'm rarely, if ever, more than about a 30 minute boat ride from my car. 

 

Band aids, tape, bandages and some Benadryl (since I'm pretty allergic to bees)

Band aids are handy for keeping the blood off the seats when you slice yourself on a fin or stubborn twist off bottle cap

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MadMan

Was wondering, you guys that keep a spare prop in your boat, do you swap them while in the water?  I've done an I/O before, but don't think I'd attempt an inboard.

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Malibuzer
6 minutes ago, MadMan said:

Was wondering, you guys that keep a spare prop in your boat, do you swap them while in the water?  I've done an I/O before, but don't think I'd attempt an inboard.

I have done it twice.  First time was in about 8ft of water.  Pain in the rear end!  Second was in 3 ft.  Took the platform off in the second and tied some ropes to the prop and tools.  Wasn't terrible.  If I would have been able to pull it out of the water I would have. 

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oldjeep
1 hour ago, MadMan said:

Was wondering, you guys that keep a spare prop in your boat, do you swap them while in the water?  I've done an I/O before, but don't think I'd attempt an inboard.

Have not tried it yet, but I do keep a mask and snorkel in the boat just in case I had to try it.  But as long as it is all in the boat and I can get to the ramp it could be on/off the trailer with a new prop in about 15 minutes.

Edited by oldjeep

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formulaben
On 11/7/2016 at 10:57 AM, srab said:

Just curious, for you guys that have a first aid kit on board, but what does it have in it, and what have you ever used it for?

I'm not suggesting its not a good idea, but, at least in my experience, the first aid kits that I've run across typically have band-aids, bandages, some tape, maybe some moleskin, some Tylenol or aspirin, maybe some butterflies and antibiotic ointment.

Never had one of these on my boat.  Never yet seen an injury, while boating, when any of the above items would have made a real difference.  In my experience, the two most important first aid items are clean/bottled water and ice. 

Having said that, I'm rarely, if ever, more than about a 30 minute boat ride from my car.

I guess it's like an insurance policy...you hope you don't ever need it.  But I did have someone cut themselves on some glass on shore.  Very nice to have proper large bandages and tape at that point.

To answer your "what is in it" questions, bandages, compresses, gauze, band-aids, scissors, tweezers, tape, benedryl, a hook removal kit, antiseptics, anti-biotics, and the other usual stuff.

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robbennett

Extra battery terminals and a terminal brush have saved me twice.

 

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electricjohn

A Leatherman tool, electrical tape, a few ty-raps, and a diving mask.  I carry a spare fan belt and impeller.  First aid kit which luckily has never been needed since 1964.  We do replace it every 5 years or so.  Last repair I needed to do while on the water, ocean actually, required nothing more than a shoelace which replaced a broken throttle linkage.

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racer808

I got extra fuses, screw drivers, socket, open end box ends, sockets, needle nose pliers, side cutter, extra zip ties, allen wrenches, we keep a couple of flash lights on board.  You may not be thinking about a trailer jack or this thing I have I forgot the name, but you stick it by a tire, pull / drive trailer wheel up it, other wheel now lifted & ready to take on & off.  

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dalt1
On 11/7/2016 at 1:53 PM, oldjeep said:

Have not tried it yet, but I do keep a mask and snorkel in the boat just in case I had to try it.  But as long as it is all in the boat and I can get to the ramp it could be on/off the trailer with a new prop in about 15 minutes.

Snorkel and mask more likely to save your day by allowing you to untangle a rope from prop than change out a prop. I have done it a couple of times and mask definitely helps.

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electricjohn
On ‎11‎/‎9‎/‎2016 at 4:30 AM, electricjohn said:

A Leatherman tool, electrical tape, a few ty-raps, and a diving mask.  I carry a spare fan belt and impeller.  First aid kit which luckily has never been needed since 1964.  We do replace it every 5 years or so.  Last repair I needed to do while on the water, ocean actually, required nothing more than a shoelace which replaced a broken throttle linkage.

Let me add a can opener in case the pull tab on my beer breaks off.

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