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ffdawg

Battery Questions

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ffdawg

Went out today to pick up a new deep-cycle marine battery because I just got my boat and it came with a regular automotive battery in it. In the marine battery section I saw Marine Starting batteries, Marine Deep-Cycle batteries, and Marine Dual-Cycle batteries (insert 'confused' smilie here). Can someone enlighten me, please, as to which would be best for my boat?

Also, when I get my marine battery can I use it and the new automotive battery the boat came with, along with a Perko switch do do a dual setup, or should both batteries be of the same type? Thanks.

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RTS

If you've got one battery for everything, it needs to be a starting battery (or the dual purpose). Starting batteries are made to provide a short burst of power to start your engine, and ARE NOT made to be deep cycled, i.e. run way down then recharged like you'd do running a trolling motor. Deep cycle batteries are made to be treated like that.

I'd go trade it in.

EDIT: But I'd get a MARINE starting battery, vs an automotive one like the one that came in your boat. Why? I don't know, but you're going to be in a marine environment, so I'd get the marine battery. They are probably identical, and the Marine one is probably more expensive because it says marine on it, but that's what I'd do. Someone may be able to explain the difference between marine and automotive better, if there is any.

Good luck with the new boat, and have fun this summer.

Edited by rts

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bigD
EDIT: Someone may be able to explain the difference between marine and automotive better, if there is any.

Good luck with the new boat, and have fun this summer.

Usually the Marine batteries have the large automotive terminals AND the small marine style terminals on them.

I think thats about it other than the higher cost.

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Big Mac

If you have a kick-a** stereo and like to listen to it for hours while on the water with the key off, then you want a deep cycle battery because it will withstand a greater number of charge/discharge cycles. If you don't routinely discharge your battery to less than about 50%, then you want a marine starting battery - screw-down terminals and less internal resistance so that it can meet the sudden current needs of your starter.

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dslskier

I think marine batteries also are reinforced internally to withstand the pounding of a marine envirionment.

I think that most boater's batteries fail within a few years due to neglect in the off season. I've had them last at most 6 years (rare) and lost a few in just one or two years. I would use your auto battery til it fails. I would add another marine if you want. I combine them so that both remain charged by alternator. If you charged them with a 110V charger they get different charge curves but the alternator doesn't care what type they are.

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Big Mac
I think marine batteries also are reinforced internally to withstand the pounding of a marine envirionment.

I think that most boater's batteries fail within a few years due to neglect in the off season. I've had them last at most 6 years (rare) and lost a few in just one or two years. I would use your auto battery til it fails. I would add another marine if you want. I combine them so that both remain charged by alternator. If you charged them with a 110V charger they get different charge curves but the alternator doesn't care what type they are.

The ideal situation for battery health would be to keep it on a float charger 24/7/365. The thing that kills batteries is sulfation, and that occurs from discharge - any discharge.

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Big Dubya
Went out today to pick up a new deep-cycle marine battery because I just got my boat and it came with a regular automotive battery in it. In the marine battery section I saw Marine Starting batteries, Marine Deep-Cycle batteries, and Marine Dual-Cycle batteries (insert 'confused' smilie here). Can someone enlighten me, please, as to which would be best for my boat?

Also, when I get my marine battery can I use it and the new automotive battery the boat came with, along with a Perko switch do do a dual setup, or should both batteries be of the same type? Thanks.

regarding the dual batteries w/ Perko switch - yes, you can do that.

I'd just recommend you run one at a time, not both at the same time.

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doughickey

Since we're talking batteries..... you may be interested in this attached file that shows "% of charge" vs "volts". Kinda handy when you use a digital voltmeter (especially in the off-season) to decide if it's time to throw the battery on the trickle charge.

BATTERY_Power_Chart_V1.1.doc

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