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99response

Boat Restoration

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99response

Alright, before I start I have to say I'm a Malibu guy through and through, heck I've owned 3 of them and I'm only 20 years old.

With that said I've come across an interesting boat I'm thinking about picking up. Only problem is its a Correct Craft. It's a 1996 Sport Nautank that sank in saltwater. Supposedly they got the engine up and running again (GT-40), changing the oils twice. I'm assuming the engine is junk, it will eventually "pop", so at the best I would need a long block (even worse is the fact its a ford). Based on the pictures it must have new exhaust manifolds and maybe an intake, and it looks like some new electrical stuff (spark plug wires).

Besides that the boat doesn't come with a trailer, and the interior looks very rough.

I'm thinking this boat will need:

1. A complete motor rebuild/longblock and all new electricals (ECM, starter, alternator, etc)

2. Needs to be completely rewired

3. Needs a new interior

4. An all new Gauge cluster

5. New cables and probably a new throttle lever

6. A trailer, I'd probably get a new one for my malibu and make the old one fit the CC

Yeah, it's a heck of a project but I think it would be alot of fun. But I do have a couple of questions for you guys...

1. Nautanks have RH rotation props, does that mean the motors are also RH rotation (adds cost)?

2. Am I crazy?

3. Do you think a saltwater tranny should be ok to rebuild or no?

4. Anyone have an ok 21-ish trailer they want to get rid of?

5. Anything I should be looking at when I got to look at it, I'll be looking for a straight shaft, no major hull damage, and how many new parts on on that motor.

6. How desirable is this hull? Seems like the used prices and NADA values are pretty high.

7. Would you buy a boat in saltwater that had a well documented and proper rebuild, including motor rebuild, complete rewire, new interior, trailer and cover, And assuming it drove and performed well (as well as a CC can....)

Ok boys let me have it, but remember I just want to have fun and make some money!

-Chris

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WakeGirl

Please tell me that someone is going to pay you to take the boat away. Crazy.gif Frankly, I wouldn't touch that project with a 40 foot pole - we've done 1 boat restoration & I'll never, ever do it again. What would the boat get on the market once you were done?

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Boatman

Re: Section 2, Question 2: Am I crazy? Crazy.gifYES!

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99response

I would want to own that boat for less than $2k, I would think it would be worth around $14 finished assuming I can provide proof that the engine, electrical, and interior is all new and in perfect working condition.

I'm crazy, but I can do it.

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WakeGirl
I would want to own that boat for less than $2k, I would think it would be worth around $14 finished assuming I can provide proof that the engine, electrical, and interior is all new and in perfect working condition.

I'm crazy, but I can do it.

That's kind of what I thought. I have no doubt that you have the skills, but with the amount of work there, you could very easily approach that number. So IMO it comes down to how much your time is worth.

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pennery

I would want to own that boat for less than $2k, I would think it would be worth around $14 finished assuming I can provide proof that the engine, electrical, and interior is all new and in perfect working condition.

I'm crazy, but I can do it.

That's kind of what I thought. I have no doubt that you have the skills, but with the amount of work there, you could very easily approach that number. So IMO it comes down to how much your time is worth.

You are asking this question to a bunch of people obsessed with Malibu boats and spend way to much time talking about it on this forum (including myself Biggrin.gif )....I think it sounds like a fun project and the learning value alone would be worth more than you could ever make off of profiting from that boat... I think the difficult part would be any fiberglass repair but it sounds like it doesn't need any. I honestly think that you will probably break even at best though so if it is strictly for profit then don't do it... If it is to spend a little time getting away from the wife and doing something you enjoy then go for it... :)

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99response

Tracie I think your right, for me it comes down the cost of the trailer and the amount of money it will take to make the motor right. If I can buy a longblock that's not too bad, but if I have to buy a crate motor it won't be worth it.

But my real question right now is are CC motors all RH rotation?

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WakeGirl

I believe that final drive is RH for all CC years, BICBW about that. I would think that a call to Ski-Dim would answer that question, or a post over on PN.

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chadwick02

2. Am I crazy? YES

7. Would you buy a boat in saltwater that had a well documented and proper rebuild, including motor rebuild, complete rewire, new interior, trailer and cover, And assuming it drove and performed well (as well as a CC can....)

HECK NO

I don’t doubt your ability either, but once you factor all the money spent on parts and all the hours put into it, I cant imagine it would be much better than buying one used that wasn’t swamped. Plus, re-sale would be shot. Why would anyone spend 14K on a used swamped boat, even if it were running at the time, if they could get a comparable one for just a little more?. I sure as heck wouldn’t.

If you got a good boat that’s running now, why not just save the time and effort and enjoy what you got. You could do a heck of a lot of skiing\boarding\drinking in the time it would take you to revive that salt swamped disaster.

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CLOUT1

My $.02 is if you spend next to nothing to get the boat, spend $10K + to fix it up, not to mention the amount of time & energy to rebuild...6 months later and 500 + hours into it, your not going to want to sell it after all that. I'm with chadwick...grab your board and a rack of Harpoon IPA and head to the dock!!! If you do take it on, good luck and look forward to seeing the pictures!

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