Jump to content

Welcome to TheMalibuCrew!

As a guest, you are welcome to poke around and view the majority of the content that we have to offer, but in order to post, search, contact members, and get full use out of the website you will need to Register for an Account. It's free and it's easy, so don't hesitate to join the TheMalibuCrew Family today!

Best way to pull a Big guy out of the water


Recommended Posts

I have a good friend that goes camping with my brothers and I. When we bring the boats it's all about skiing. The problem I'm having is that my buddy is 320lbs and stands 6'3". Years ago when he was smaller he was able to get up after a few tries. Now days not so much luck. Any advice? Would changing my stock prop to 4 blade help? Please let me know. Thanks

Link to comment

Fat kid ski.....Connelly makes a couple of them, the Outlaw & the Big Daddy. Or a foil. Both will be easier than a ski/board made for a smaller guy.

Although.... I have a buddy who used to have a 154 cm Hyperlite BAFF. Maybe there are similar boards around now.

Edited by Bill_AirJunky
  • Like 2
Link to comment

+1 for foil being easier. A 144+cm wakeboard too. But if skiing is #1, a wider, longer ski would be helpful. I am 6'4 and just shy of 300 pounds and ride a 71" HO triumph. It's still a bit of work for me to get up but proper form, strength and a big long deep breath is a must.

A slingshot nomad will most likely be my next wakeboard. They come in 150, 155 and 160cm

Edited by isellacuras
  • Like 1
Link to comment

I"m 310/6'2 and have managed to anchor boats including jet boats, 19ft sea ray's and a 20 ft bayliner while in the water behind them. Water ski's have never been an option for me, just not enough surface area for me to hold on long enough to plane - It took me a year to learn to hydrofoil, but once I found a big enough wing, I've been riding ever since.. :)

Link to comment
MalibuNation

I'll 2nd that getting up on a wake board is easier.

I've know a lot of people who used to ski and were good at it and got older and bigger and they insist on getting up one ski ... never a pretty sight. I think the last 3 times I've been involved in this situation the guys either got hurt and/or retired from skiing for good. Is getting up on 2 skis and dropping an option?

Link to comment

I have one big dude waterski buddy. He drags a foot and we give him a soft pull.

Also make sure he's directly behind the stern, not out to the side.

If he's going over the front of the ski, shorten the rope a bit and put it on the tower so he gets more of a pull up.

If he's going out one side of the ski, get the magic rope: http://www.airhead.com/ez-up-slalom-training-rope.html

It's mostly mental, once the skier begins to have success getting up, it becomes easier.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
MalibuNation

Can you lighten the load when the big guy is being pulled? Back in the day when we were better skiers people would ask where do the passengers sit? We would say beside the spotter they sit on the dock, the beach ... :)

Link to comment

Definitely get up on two wide ski's then kick one if he wants to slalom. And a shorter line helps too. Put him at 28 or 32 off just for the first couple tries.

Steve B.

Link to comment

I have a good friend that goes camping with my brothers and I. When we bring the boats it's all about skiing. The problem I'm having is that my buddy is 320lbs and stands 6'3". Years ago when he was smaller he was able to get up after a few tries. Now days not so much luck. Any advice? Would changing my stock prop to 4 blade help? Please let me know. Thanks

Your prop won't matter. If he's not getting up its not the boat's fault. You have more than enough power and prop slip is also not responsible. Every big person I've pulled I actually find that less is more with the throttle. Thinking "O he's big I need to hit it really hard" is actually worse because then he's being asked to hold the boat rather than the boat getting him moving and then being able to stand up on the water at sufficient speed.

  • Like 2
Link to comment

We had a guy who used to kill a 454 jet boat that was capable of ripping a normal persons arms off. Even on 2 skis if they can't control their body enough to keep the ski tips pointed and stop bending at the waist and plowing water with their gut then there is nothing you can do to get someone that big out of the water. Have someone take a good look at their position in the water, get them to lay back and push their legs out a bit while pointing their toes. If that works then the next issue will be them falling back as soon as they come up.

Link to comment

Our boats are not lacking the power to pull big fat people up! Its all in the technique. With that said its not easy to get the technique for an over weight person correct.

I talk from experience, I was one! If I got things correct you come out easy if I was screwing up I could fight it all day long.

It will depend some what on the strength and personal likes of each person.

I like to start some what easy but add power very quickly. It gives me the ability to get may body in a good starting position over the ski.

1 Slack out of rope

2 Be sure the skier has 5or 6 inches of the ski tip above water.

3 As the pull starts get your butt planted over the very back of the ski. Push down with your toes. Do not let your body get forward on the ski. Head down between arms.

* The driver should be adding power now.

4 Your arms should be fully extended letting the boat do all the work! As the ski starts to come up do not rush standing up.

Once the ski is flat on the water stand and enjoy!.

It all sounds so easy. I am not a beginner and when I am getting it wrong I seam to get frustrated and get worse with each try. If you are tired its likely to get worse take a brake and try again.

More often then not the skier is getting over the front of the ski and putting the tip into the water early.

You can do a fat ski or dock start but if you are getting it correct a fat boy can ski a small Hi end thin ski.

I skied a 67" Good and a 68" D3 for years at 230, 235 lbs without any problems.

  • Like 2
Link to comment

Tell him to hold on and hold his breath.

I have my driver hit it hard up to about 3200rpms or so and I submarine for 15-30seconds before fully getting above the water. You should see the spray I put off getting up.

It's a chore but I still enjoy it. I'd rather get quickly than be dragged through plowing the water and wasting all my energy getting up versus actually skiing.

Link to comment

I am not a big guy, but I find standing once the ski is moving helps me clear the water easier. Boat should be accelerating enough to keep the slack off. I like sixball's description otherwise. Ski to butt, knees to chest.

Link to comment

Get a big wakeboard, and have him give up the ski - or just use duct tape around wrists to handle!

Seriously though, it may be difficult to figure this out, but there will be something he's doing hidden under the water that is causing the problem. We are men, and we pull fight and push against all the forces that are trying to get us up! Tell him to stay in a ball, think like a woman (except for this hands) and try to not fight against the pull. The less of his body creating drag will ease his try. I'm guessing as soon as you hit gas, his legs tense up go straight and he starts to pull against the rope!

Link to comment

Your prop won't matter. If he's not getting up its not the boat's fault. You have more than enough power and prop slip is also not responsible. Every big person I've pulled I actually find that less is more with the throttle. Thinking "O he's big I need to hit it really hard" is actually worse because then he's being asked to hold the boat rather than the boat getting him moving and then being able to stand up on the water at sufficient speed.

Exactly. Most common problem people do is too hot of a pull if someone doesn't get up. I'm 6'3" 245 and hate hot pulls when getting up slalom or wakeboard. A slower, soft pull actually makes that person learn to have better technique, thus making the process of getting up easier. I always say to beginners, you need to "ride the board up, not fight the water".

Although, I prefer medium-fast-fast pulls barefooting, but that is a different beast.

Link to comment

The bigger the more important to get the technique correct. Get it wright and you come up easy. If not you will likely fight it all the way.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...