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svnfightsvn

amp question with parallel speaker wiring

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svnfightsvn

So I have a quick question that I think I already know the answer of, but I'd like to be sure.

I have a RF 400.4 amp, 4 channels, 50 watts per channel at 4 ohms.

This amp is driving my in-boat speakers (RF M262B) of which I have 3 pairs (6 speakers total). The speakers are 4 ohms rated at 75 RMS.

I have the bow and the cockpit speakers wired in parallel to the front 2 channels and the lounge speakers wired up to the rear channels.

I know that the rears are under-powered because they are rated at 75 RMS, but the amp only puts out 50 watts per channel.

My question is the bow and cockpit speakers. I have them wired in parallel to the front 2 channels, so does that mean that each speaker is getting 100 watts? My understanding was that parallel wiring of speakers decreases the impedance by 2 times what the wattage is...

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Bobby Light

With the way you have it wired all our speakers are getting 50 watts to them, the paralleled speakers will split the 100 watts the amp puts out at 2 ohms. In this case parallel wiring those speakers halves the impedance and doubles the power from the amp.

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wheelman

Exactly as bobby said.

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svnfightsvn

The specs on the amp says it puts out 100 watts at 2 ohms

So are my four speakers that are wired in parallel getting 100 watts each?

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shawndoggy

100w total. if you have two speakers on that channel, then yes the two speakers are getting 100w.... between the two of them. So 50w apiece.

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svnfightsvn

so ALL my in-boat speakers are underpowered...wonderful :)

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Earmark Marine

svnfightsvn, on 18 Sept 2013 - 3:57 PM, said:

so ALL my in-boat speakers are underpowered...wonderful :)

Hold your horses. The difference between 50 and 75 watts is minor in respect to a difference in volume. Keep in mind that acoustic output differences are related to a change in power ratio and not necessarily a wattage number. So a difference of 25 watts between 5 and 30 watts is huge. But the difference between 50 and 75 watts is just above the minimum audible threshold.

Those speaker power specs are less about the actual required power and more about the speaker's thermal capacity.

You're okay. You'll just know that the speakers can handle more power if needed in the future.

David

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shawndoggy

so ALL my in-boat speakers are underpowered...wonderful :)

close enough. Doubtful you'd hear a difference on the water.

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Bawshogg

But for those WW followers, What is David all in a tizzy over if 55 watts really doesnt mean much?

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Bobby Light

But for those WW followers, What is David all in a tizzy over if 55 watts really doesnt mean much?

It only matters when it's on the agenda.

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svnfightsvn

so this amp is bridgable...200 watts at 4 ohms on 2 channels.

can I bridge it and get more power to the speakers?

If I wire my in-boats all in parallel (3 to each channel) it looks like I'm dealing with 1.33 ohms.

If my amp puts out 200 watts at 4 ohms, what is it putting out at 1.33 ohms? Is it 200 / 3 = 66.6?

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Bobby Light

If my amp puts out 200 watts at 4 ohms, what is it putting out at 1.33 ohms?

It will be putting out a bunch of smoke. There is no better and stable way to wire it than you have now. If you want more power get a different amp.

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jk13

If my amp puts out 200 watts at 4 ohms, what is it putting out at 1.33 ohms?

It will be putting out a bunch of smoke. There is no better and stable way to wire it than you have now. If you want more power get a different amp.

Haha I agree. You know how hard it is to gather and repack all that smoke back into the amp once you let it out? I hate having to do that.

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David

so this amp is bridgable...200 watts at 4 ohms on 2 channels.

can I bridge it and get more power to the speakers?

If I wire my in-boats all in parallel (3 to each channel) it looks like I'm dealing with 1.33 ohms.

If my amp puts out 200 watts at 4 ohms, what is it putting out at 1.33 ohms? Is it 200 / 3 = 66.6?

2-ohms is the minimum safe and stable impedance/resistance for your particular amplifier.

Putting specs aside, rarely does an amplifier truly double its power as you halve the impedance, and your amplifier is no exception. Typically you get at least 60% of your 2-ohm power into a 4-ohm load. And running at a 4-ohm load gives you more dynamic headroom. So if you want to increase power without a wholesale change, and if you have the available real estate, then keep your eye out for a matching amplifier in a 2-channel version. Then run six channels (one dedicated channel per speaker). You might end up with two channels that are more powerful than the rest. And that can be an advantage in set-up since some speakers based on location deserve a little more power. Also keep in mind that the number of amplifiers do not determine the current draw (other than a couple of amps per amplifier). Only the total power determines the total current draw. Plus, amplifiers operate more efficiently at the higher 4-ohm load which more than offsets the extra chassis. Just an option if you want more power and to come closer to your speaker power rating.

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happypappy

so this amp is bridgable...200 watts at 4 ohms on 2 channels.

can I bridge it and get more power to the speakers?

If I wire my in-boats all in parallel (3 to each channel) it looks like I'm dealing with 1.33 ohms.

If my amp puts out 200 watts at 4 ohms, what is it putting out at 1.33 ohms? Is it 200 / 3 = 66.6?

Only in a perfect world and on paper. There are many other factors that will lower the output. ANd those factors never increase the output!

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skiatook_bu

I had a "temporary" tower amp that would handle a 2 ohm load, but it would frequently overheat and shut off. I rewired the speakers in series at the speaker connectors, and it hasn't done it since.

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