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justinwivey

Need Help Gelcoat Restoration

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justinwivey

Guys I have been reading up on restoring my boat to a shiny state. I have an 86 Skier and the gelcoat is very dull. From what I have been reading, there are a couple options. Wetsand or 3M rubbing compound or both. Which one should I do? Can someone please give me a step by step on what I need to do. I have no professional detailing experience. Do I need to buy a variable speed polishe for 3m compoundr? If wet sand, what grit paper do I need? Do I wet sand by hand? Is there any way I can ruin the finish by doing something incorrectly?

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CumminsBu

Try a spot by hand using the 3m compond. If it doesn't do what you want, try wetsanding start with about a 2000 grit. Sand in a "X" fashion. Then follow up by 3m compound. Without see the boat I'm shooting form the hip. Youtube is a gold mine on how to videos. Since you have not done this before I would start there.

Edited by CumminsBu

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malibuparadise

I was recently doing part-time work at my local marina polishing severely crazed catamaran windows using a 5 step polishing process. For the first, Roy handed me a spray bottle with a little dishsoap and water in it. Llight spraying to stay moist while pad sanding (wetpaper 1500) made it much easier with good results. I mean it worked to restore marine-grade plexiglass.

Using the soap and water trick is probably old hat for any wetsanding ops, but nice lesson for me anyway.

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Levi900RR

:plus1: on this thread. I'm not sure how bad yours is but if its not horrible I used a Meguires fiberglass restoration kit on mine. It worked really well. Here is the thread.

http://www.themalibucrew.com/forums/index.php?/topic/32072-meguires-fiberglass-restore-kit/?hl=meguires

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Falko

do not wetsand unless absolutely necessary. I've had good luck with 3M final cut polisher on pretty oxidized material. If you get a buffer, get a rotary, not a random orbit. Fiberglass is pretty forgiving, just keep the speed down.

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Levi900RR

do not wetsand unless absolutely necessary. I've had good luck with 3M final cut polisher on pretty oxidized material. If you get a buffer, get a rotary, not a random orbit. Fiberglass is pretty forgiving, just keep the speed down.

I would agree with this, but don't be scared of wetsanding. Go slow and take your time and your results will reflect your effort.

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justinwivey

Thanks for the replies guys. I plan on starting this next weekend!!

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Jimmy Buffett

Wet sand with very fine sandpaper

Then use #0000 steel wool

Rubbing compound

Polish (such 3M Finesse It II Finishing Compound)

Wax.

You can start in reverse until the scratch is gone, then work your way back down and finish up with the wax.

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cstk421

I'm planning on doing the same when winter breaks. Could you put up before and after photos ?

Thanks

Claudio

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justinwivey

Yes, I plan on starting this weekend. I will post pics of before and after!

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