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Jmhtaylor

Will my JL 13w7 fit under my driver side dash on my '12 wakesetter vlx?

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Jmhtaylor

I just bought a JL 13w7 for a price so low I could not pass it up. 599.00. Brand new. I was planning on putting a JL 12w7 and I know I have seen these fit in front of the driver as a ported box. My question is, does anyone know of any pics on a 'Bu with 13W7. I know this is all about volume of space and that anything is possible but I want to know if I should just plan on putting it somewhere else in the boat. And if anyone can show me a picture of a Malibu similar in model that has a JL 13w7???

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Murphy8166

Im sure you can find some way to jam a box of that size somewhere in the boat.

Unfortunately a W7 sub might have been a choice that is going to leave you with many challenges ahead. The first being the size of a ported box, if you put it under the drivers help, you will loose leg room and it will be a challenging build. The second thing is that that woofer is very power hungry and horribly inefficient so you better plan on adding batteries. You will also need a large amp that can accomodate dual 1.5 ohm speaker coils.

I'm not saying it is a bad woofer but not a good choice for a boat no matter how much money you saved. You won't find many on this forum or others in the tow boat arena running a w-7.

Good luck

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JAXONBOATS

All the claims above I agree with but It Can Be Done. Based on feedback from our resources on the 13w7- after they looked at a couple under the dash designs I have done, they responded: You are doing an injustice to the sub, it works best with the prescribed rectangle/baffled/ported claiming additional loss in performance on the wild angle designs. And they added: this is regardless of meeting cubic foot box size requirements.

Now I am running the Rockford Fosgate 58 pound T2 with excellent results.

Great price! I say build a solid box and enjoy – Not many really get to enjoy some of the high caliber subs on the market. An indescribable improvement!

Congrat’s

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Earmark Marine

Jmh,

Typically to get optimum results you begin with the boat, which dictates the best location and maximum enclosure size, which then dictates the loading method and driver choice. But with the driver selection first, here are a few things to consider....

Under the driver's helm console is the only good location. Every other location option in a BU is a very distant second in acoustic performance.

A direct radiating driver and port is the only way in this case.

A bass-reflex enclosure is recommended in the open field environment of a boat. It gives you another 3 dB of output (equivalent to doubling your amplifier power) without the extra thermal strain or having to double the woofer excursion. That which is most responsive and operating most convervatively always sounds the best. Bass-reflex will also deliver another one-third octave in deep bass extension before reaching the half power roll-off point which is important in an open field where creating deep bass is an up-hill challenge versus a home or vehicle. You are going to need an enclosure with 3.6 cu.ft. external displacement. That will be a complex design and build to fit in the helm cavity with remaining leg room. A few angles are fine but an enclosure with complex appendages to achieve the required displacement does NOT perform.

In an open-field environment where acoustic power dissipates (more like flash evaporation on deep bass), you usually need to have an amplifier that is at the very top of the woofer's thermal power rating. Unless it is a strictly regulated amplifier you have to consider how much power the amplifier delivers into a given impedance (rather than it's optimum rating) and how much power the amplifier delivers with a realistic supply voltage (rather than an unrealistic CEA2006 14.4 volt rating at an easy 1kHz). You are going to want an honest 1500 watts at 50 Hz, at a 12 to 13 volt supply and into the driver's specific voice coil impedance.

It's not what the alternator or batteries can potentially deliver but rather what the voltage supply truly sags to when under load from the entire system (all amplifiers).

A variable subsonic filter will be important.

Those are a few of the basics to get the most from what you have.

David

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Truekaotik

Don't have pics of one in a Malibu, sorry.. It is power hungry but not that inefficient as subs go... If you do choose to go ahead and use this beast, run 2 (M)HD750.1's and make it fit under the helm... I hope you have the same quality inboats and towers... This thing when done properly will move some air... And some fiberglass... :)

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Earmark Marine

The issue of 'efficiency' has come up here several times.

There are a number of distinctions.

The difference between sensitivity and efficiency? Sensitivity could mean the peak power at any frequency (even though it's not in the realm of the bandwidth the speaker will be playing) at one watt at one meter. There is absolutely ZERO correlation between a small signal sensitivity and how a woofer performs efficiently at 35 Hz at a large excursion driven by 1000 watts. So unqualified specs don't mean much. Just ink on paper.

Typically a woofer that has a tremendous amount of surface area, has very low distortion, is well-damped, has minimal cone break-up, handles lots of power, is linear (equal responsiveness and amplitude across a wide bandwidth), is capable of alot of excursion under control, plays really deep, is going to have a serious amount of moving mass to drive and, perhaps more importantly, to control, will require a ton of power to reach its potential. This same big power recommendation would apply to any subwoofer of any brand unless it was a sound re-inforcement speaker, guitar speaker or a speaker where the design objectives are shifted towards another singular focus at the cost of other performance parameters.

David

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