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Harrison256

Zinc Anodes

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Harrison256

So I was thinking about getting a zinc anode put on the boat just because I might occasionally put it in Brackish water but I'm not completely sure about that yet. If I ever decide to I'd want to be as prepared as possible.

How hard is this to do myself and how expensive? (dealer quoted $300)

I don't even know what it is to be honest can someone explain it to me?

Is it worth it or would it not really make that much of a difference?

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Ndawg12

So I was thinking about getting a zinc anode put on the boat just because I might occasionally put it in Brackish water but I'm not completely sure about that yet. If I ever decide to I'd want to be as prepared as possible.

How hard is this to do myself and how expensive? (dealer quoted $300)

I don't even know what it is to be honest can someone explain it to me?

Is it worth it or would it not really make that much of a difference?

It has to do with a small amount of electrical current running through everything conducive on the boat. When they come in contact with the salt water it somehow creates a reaction that will slowly errode or pit the metal, I've seen alot of wedges in particular have this happen. The sacrificial zinc anode will absorb the chemical reaction but will deteriorate over time (not sure on the length).

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MexTex

May want to contact "Oceanbu"

You can see from the pictures, he had one installed on the rubber and a few on the swim platform. He told me that the shaft anode deteriorated the fastest. He said that one needed to be replaced once a season.

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Woodski

Don't foget the cooling system, a couple in the exhaust manifolds.

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Bake's Marine

May want to contact "Oceanbu"

http://www.themalibu...__fromsearch__1

You can see from the pictures, he had one installed on the rubber and a few on the swim platform. He told me that the shaft anode deteriorated the fastest. He said that one needed to be replaced once a season.

I think Oceanbu is probably exposing his boat to the worst case scenario possible, I would have a zinc any place I could put one mooring a boat out in the Salt Water like that.

-Paul

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Harrison256

Well back to my point, is $300 a rip to install an anode. Is it a fairly simple DIY job?

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Ndawg12

Well back to my point, is $300 a rip to install an anode. Is it a fairly simple DIY job?

You need to find out if it's just one anode (hopefully not) or in several locations as previously mentioned.

If it's just the one on the shaft like MexTex shows then you should just need an allen wrench. Not sure what the anode itself costs but $300 is way high for the part and to tighten a couple screws!!

Edited by Ndawg12

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tvano

It has to do with a small amount of electrical current running through everything conducive on the boat. When they come in contact with the salt water it somehow creates a reaction that will slowly errode or pit the metal, I've seen alot of wedges in particular have this happen. The sacrificial zinc anode will absorb the chemical reaction but will deteriorate over time (not sure on the length).

yup, right on the money.

dissimilar metals(prop, drive shaft, engine block, etc.) in a liquid(lake, pond) creates a battery which produces an electrical current.

as part of the chemical reaction of that battery; one of the metals (the least noble) will oxidize.

to reduce the effects you add that 'least noble' in the form of a sacrificial anode.

it's much less expensive to periodically replace that sacrificial anode than a valued (metal) piece of the rig.

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Baddog

yup, right on the money.

dissimilar metals(prop, drive shaft, engine block, etc.) in a liquid(lake, pond) creates a battery which produces an electrical current.

as part of the chemical reaction of that battery; one of the metals (the least noble) will oxidize.

to reduce the effects you add that 'least noble' in the form of a sacrificial anode.

it's much less expensive to periodically replace that sacrificial anode than a valued (metal) piece of the rig.

Like my wedge bracket. I need to add an anode next season.

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malibudog

one of the metals (the least noble) will oxidize.

to reduce the effects you add that 'least noble' in the form of a sacrificial anode.

it's much less expensive to periodically replace that sacrificial anode than a valued (metal) piece of the rig.

kind of like always taking a slow fat friend with you when hiking through bear country?

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svnfightsvn

hate to jump on the thread after its been dead for a while, but I have a similar question.

I currently dont have a closed cooling system on my 340 monsoon and i run my boat in brackish water.

Can I add some zinc anodes inside the engine block and exhaust risers by replacing some of the stock drain plugs?

Is this possible or even a good idea?

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