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Ndawg12

After 10 months of ownership I'm not sure

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Ndawg12

I have tandem boatmate and had to stop rather quickly the other day. It didn't really feel like the trailer gave me any help. So I remembered something I read on here, I unhooked the power from the truck and backed the trailer up hill. It didn't appear the brakes engaged at all. What other tricks can I try to confirm this and where do I start as far as fixing this problem?

TIA

Edited by nemire12

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Bonz
I have tandem boatmate and had to stop rather quickly the other day. It didn't really feel like the trailer gave me any help. So I remembered something I read on here, I unhooked the power from the truck and backed the trailer up hill. It didn't appear the brakes engaged at all. What other tricks can I try to confirm this and where do I start as far as fixing this problem?

TIA

I believe your trailer brake system is a standard actuator type brake system manufactured by UFP. If it is, unhooking the power does nothing. You should checked the brake fluid level in the reservoir.

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chathamsolutions

This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

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nuttyskier2002
I have tandem boatmate and had to stop rather quickly the other day. It didn't really feel like the trailer gave me any help. So I remembered something I read on here, I unhooked the power from the truck and backed the trailer up hill. It didn't appear the brakes engaged at all. What other tricks can I try to confirm this and where do I start as far as fixing this problem?

TIA

I believe your trailer brake system is a standard actuator type brake system manufactured by UFP. If it is, unhooking the power does nothing. You should checked the brake fluid level in the reservoir.

If you have a 5-pin connector (blue wire) on the trailer wire harness the master cylinder has a brake lockout solenoid. It is activated when you shift to reverse by the backup light circuit. If he doesm't have this then you are correct.

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skier92
I have tandem boatmate and had to stop rather quickly the other day. It didn't really feel like the trailer gave me any help. So I remembered something I read on here, I unhooked the power from the truck and backed the trailer up hill. It didn't appear the brakes engaged at all. What other tricks can I try to confirm this and where do I start as far as fixing this problem?

TIA

I believe your trailer brake system is a standard actuator type brake system manufactured by UFP. If it is, unhooking the power does nothing. You should checked the brake fluid level in the reservoir.

This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

Nemire: Do you have a UFP coupler, surge brake actuator and disc brakes, and the electric reverse cut out solenoid? If so, and to use my buddy's favorite line when he knows he's right "Trust me on this" , if you disconnect the trailer wiring, and try backing up a hill, if the brake system is working properly, the brakes will apply. If they do not, something is wrong, and yes, checking the brake fluid for proper level is near the top of the trouble shooting list. I'd suggest that this is a much safer method of determining if the brakes are working at all than a 30MPH brake lockup towing over 3500 lbs.

if you do indeed have UFP products, here is a link to their actuator owners manual: http://www.ufpnet.com/Portals/0/PDFs/A-60,...Maintenance.pdf

The trouble shooting guide is pretty good.

Edited by skier92

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Ndawg12
I have tandem boatmate and had to stop rather quickly the other day. It didn't really feel like the trailer gave me any help. So I remembered something I read on here, I unhooked the power from the truck and backed the trailer up hill. It didn't appear the brakes engaged at all. What other tricks can I try to confirm this and where do I start as far as fixing this problem?

TIA

I believe your trailer brake system is a standard actuator type brake system manufactured by UFP. If it is, unhooking the power does nothing. You should checked the brake fluid level in the reservoir.

This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

Nemire: Do you have a UFP coupler, surge brake actuator and disc brakes, and the electric reverse cut out solenoid? If so, and to use my buddy's favorite line when he knows he's right "Trust me on this" , if you disconnect the trailer wiring, and try backing up a hill, if the brake system is working properly, the brakes will apply. If they do not, something is wrong, and yes, checking the brake fluid for proper level is near the top of the trouble shooting list. I'd suggest that this is a much safer method of determining if the brakes are working at all than a 30MPH brake lockup towing over 3500 lbs.

if you do indeed have UFP products, here is a link to their actuator owners manual: http://www.ufpnet.com/Portals/0/PDFs/A-60,...Maintenance.pdf

The trouble shooting guide is pretty good.

Yes, I have a 5 pin connector, surge and discs. I will review this manual, thanks.

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Baddog

I had the same problem with mine and the simple test for whether they were working at all was to jack up one axle, use a 2 x 4 as a lever to manually compress the coupler while an able assistant spun the wheel. Imagine my surprise when absolutely nothing happend. I ended up replacing both brake cylinders and a brake line and then having to comletely flush the whole system. That was fun, but I used the same 2 x 4 lever system to move the fluid through the lines.

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99response

I have a sticky caliper this year on my boatmate, you'd be amazed how nasty the brake fluid gets in those lines, I would start with a flush...which is a pain in the butt.

Boatmate is very helpful also, I would give them a call if you need any advise.

-Chris

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Ndawg12

Maybe this is why I haven't had any problems overheating my tires and melting the bead, maybe I should leave it alone!!! Dontknow.gif

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Brian-w

OK, so assuming my trailer brakes aren't working. and my boat lives on my trailer when it's not in the water, any suggestions on how to get them repaired?

Do I take the trailer to a shop with the boat on it and leave the whole set up? And if so, do I go to a standard automotive repair shop, or boat dealer?

Any recommendations in VA?

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Ndawg12
OK, so assuming my trailer brakes aren't working. and my boat lives on my trailer when it's not in the water, any suggestions on how to get them repaired?

Do I take the trailer to a shop with the boat on it and leave the whole set up? And if so, do I go to a standard automotive repair shop, or boat dealer?

Any recommendations in VA?

try searching yahoo yellow pages or yellowbook.com for trailer sales, service, or repair, your closest dealer could also probably point you in the right direction.

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Bobby Light
Maybe this is why I haven't had any problems overheating my tires and melting the bead, maybe I should leave it alone!!! Dontknow.gif

I don't know I've never had that problem on any trailer I've ever had. I'm now knocking on wood.

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Bonz
This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

Simple, yet effective. I like it.

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Ndawg12
Maybe this is why I haven't had any problems overheating my tires and melting the bead, maybe I should leave it alone!!! Dontknow.gif

I don't know I've never had that problem on any trailer I've ever had. I'm now knocking on wood.

Neither have I (knock wood) but that would be my luck, fix one issue and create another!!!

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Pistol Pete
This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

Wait a minute there Andy,

The reason we did that 30 to 0 test was to try to get your piston un-stuck, remember?

I believe that I was checking for equal heat on both wheels to determine if the brakes were working.

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Ndawg12
This is what PistolPete did to check mine. Drive out on a road where there's no other traffic. Get above 30MPH and hit the brakes hard.

If you don't lock up, then the brakes aren't working :)

Wait a minute there Andy,

The reason we did that 30 to 0 test was to try to get your piston un-stuck, remember?

I believe that I was checking for equal heat on both wheels to determine if the brakes were working.

There's always 2 sides to every story, so did it work, cause I still might try that!!

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wienrdog

You can search for a UFP authorized repair center nearby... They're typically boat repair facilities & will take trailer & get you fixed up... The one near here is often pretty quick to get simple work done as they fit it into a day when a tech finishes work on another boat early.

I had problems with my first trailer not working & they replaced the coupler, etc - overall cost was $300.

Second trailer, I had them bleed the system & it's been good since - cost was $100 & they needed to drill & tap the drains. I'll likely have them flush, bleed & check the system again next year as it's been 3 years.

I typically do most maintenance on the boat myself, but the braking system on the trailer is one that I'll pay a reasonable cost to have the manufacturer authorized repair facility fix.

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Pistol Pete

Nemire.

You did the right thing by un-plugging the wire connector and backing the loaded trailer up a hill. If your tow rig is of normal power, the tow rig should have really struggled to back the trailer up the hill if the brakes are working properly.

Just to let you know, I've had nothing but problems with my entire UFP surge brake system. I think I've replaced every component there is in the 10 yrs. of the trailer's life. You definetly need to check the fluid level as a first step. Then, you need to figure out what type of brake fluid the trailer mfg. put in there.

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Ndawg12
Nemire.

You did the right thing by un-plugging the wire connector and backing the loaded trailer up a hill. If your tow rig is of normal power, the tow rig should have really struggled to back the trailer up the hill if the brakes are working properly.

Just to let you know, I've had nothing but problems with my entire UFP surge brake system. I think I've replaced every component there is in the 10 yrs. of the trailer's life. You definetly need to check the fluid level as a first step. Then, you need to figure out what type of brake fluid the trailer mfg. put in there.

Well I have to be totally honest in that I was outside watching to see if the wheels locked up. My wife was driving and she didn't give me any feedback on resistance plus it was on gravel and the incline was sharp so the vehicle only went back about 5 feet before she lost all traction. It was a terrible test. I'll check the fluid level first and retry the test in better conditions this weekend. I'll probably bleed the entire system anyways and replace with clean fresh fluid since I doubt it was ever done. Anyone have an idea on the total fluid capacity, how much dot x fluid I should buy?

Edited by nemire12

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Pistol Pete
Nemire.

You did the right thing by un-plugging the wire connector and backing the loaded trailer up a hill. If your tow rig is of normal power, the tow rig should have really struggled to back the trailer up the hill if the brakes are working properly.

Just to let you know, I've had nothing but problems with my entire UFP surge brake system. I think I've replaced every component there is in the 10 yrs. of the trailer's life. You definetly need to check the fluid level as a first step. Then, you need to figure out what type of brake fluid the trailer mfg. put in there.

Well I have to be totally honest in that I was outside watching to see if the wheels locked up. My wife was driving and she didn't give me any feedback on resistance plus it was on gravel and the incline was sharp so the vehicle only went back about 5 feet before she lost all traction. It was a terrible test. I'll check the fluid level first and retry the test in better conditions this weekend. I'll probably bleed the entire system anyways and replace with clean fresh fluid since I doubt it was ever done. Anyone have an idea on the total fluid capacity, how much dot x fluid I should buy?

Oh man,

That test was totally flawed.

You need to re-do it on a regularly paved road with you behind the wheel. When I say the trailer should give resistance, I mean the truck is really gonna struggle to push that thing up the hill if the brakes are working. This time, have your wife stand near the big round pin that is on the top front of the coupler and have her note how far back that pin slides when you're reversing up the hill. The pin should never slide all the way to the rear of the slot.

You really need to call your trailer mfg. and find out what brake fluid was in the system. You cannot mix them. The master cylinder only holds about 1/2 cup of fluid in it's reservior but, I'd buy 2 cans of brake fluid because you don't want to run out in the middle of the job.

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Ndawg12

Yeah, we were pulling into the storage area and going down a hill, no one was around, so I thought why not, it didn't tell me much but at least it brought a potential issue to my attention. Wont the coupler have a stamp on it that says what the recommended fluid is? If I had to guess, it would be dot 3. I will email boatmate to see if can get a response. Thanks Pete.

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electricjohn

My trailer wheels will lock immediately if backing up the slightest incline without the electrical plug attatched. To me, this is normal.

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Ndawg12
My trailer wheels will lock immediately if backing up the slightest incline without the electrical plug attatched. To me, this is normal.

Completely lock, like they will skid if forced???

Here's a Plus1.gif for boatmate!!

Nate,

The brake fluid is DOT3.

If the brakes aren’t working, the first thing I would do is to check the fluid level. If it’s is low or dry, that is most likely the culprit and the lines will need to be bled thoroughly to purge all of the air out. One small bubble at the head of the system will cause them not to work properly (or at all) and will take a while to expel that bubble if it’s near the actuator end of the line. If it’s low or dry, after bleeding the brakes, make sure you check it over closely for leaks. The level usually doesn’t drop very much without a reason. Although the fluid level drops slightly as the brake pads wear, it shouldn’t drop enough to suck air into the system.

I’ve attached a PDF on the brake actuator. Bleeding the brakes is covered on pages 24 and 25.

I’ve also attached a PDF on the disc brakes and the hubs. Although the brakes do not require any service, the hub oil should be changed every other year. So, if it’s never been done, it’s due.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,

Jerry

From: Nate Nemire [mailto:[email protected]]

Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2009 8:02 AM

To: [email protected]; [email protected]

Subject: Boatmate Trailers Web Contact Form

Name: Nate Nemire

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 7045169824

Addr1: 5742 Bentgrass Run Drive

Addr2:

City: Charlotte

State: NC

Zip: 28269

Comments: I have an '06 tandem boatmate trailer that came with my Malibu boat. I don't believe it was ever serviced before I bought it. I had to stop rather quickly the other day and it didn't feel like the trailer helped me at all. My main question is what is the recommended fluid for my trailer. Any other help or insight would be appreciated.

submit: Submit

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electricjohn
My trailer wheels will lock immediately if backing up the slightest incline without the electrical plug attatched. To me, this is normal.

Completely lock, like they will skid if forced???

On wet grass, yes. On any hard surface, I have never pushed it that hard. But the trailer surely don't want to move.

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