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Learning to Dock


patchgirl

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Hey,

Took our new 23 LSV out yesterday afternoon to practice learning to dock and load the thing???? My son does a great job driving the boat, but had two near castaprophes trying to unload passengers and put it back on the trailer. Any suggestions to learning this without dinging up the boat?? Luckily we saved the boat, but now he is pretty nervous about it. It was the back swinging around. No control in reverse etc.

Please help!!!

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Hey,

Took our new 23 LSV out yesterday afternoon to practice learning to dock and load the thing???? My son does a great job driving the boat, but had two near castaprophes trying to unload passengers and put it back on the trailer. Any suggestions to learning this without dinging up the boat?? Luckily we saved the boat, but now he is pretty nervous about it. It was the back swinging around. No control in reverse etc.

Please help!!!

Throw a bumper in out in the middle and practice "docking" to it and navigating around it. As for loading (and docking), search the threads, there are lots of discussions. Personnally, I alternate between nuetral and forward enough to keep forward control without getting up too much speed. I think that is pretty much the norm. It takes a little practice to line up in the middle of the trailer when you're off to the side, and when you're on a river with side current, or in the wind, or there are a bunch of impatient drunks waiting... The best thing to do is go out on a cold day when no one is out and practice, practice, practice. With no one there, you are free to punch reverse with out too much worry.

One thing I always remember (might have been Mdude that said it) don't approach the dock any faster than you are willing to hit it. Bottom line, patience and planning ahead when docking or retrieving.

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i think your issue is something we have all had to deal with and still deal with when showing someone how to operate the boat.

i agree with the comment to aim the boat as near as you can then use forward-neutral-forward-neutral etc., just nudge it along until you get it parked. it is kinda like a pwc in that you do not have any steering unless you are under power.

one more thing, reverse is your friend, sometimes, depending on the weather or wind, you may have to come in hot (not wot though), just hit reverse to stop the boat or slow it down as you need.

edit: ok, one more thing, practice is best done in calm conditions.

2nd edit: have you posted pics yet? Maybe you should get that done before you bang and scratch the crap out of it... :)

Edited by Cervelo
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Your boat will only turn one way in reverse, no matter which way you turn the steering wheel. Learn to use that to your advantage.

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And while you are learning, get a boat hook to keep on board. While you are getting the hang of things, you can use the hook to keep your boat off the dock, and can also use it to grab the dock when you get close enough.

And remember, damage to your boat increases exponentially with speed. Keep it nice and slow around the docks and when loading on the trailer.

It will be secong nature to you soon. We all had to learn sometime.

Edited by rts
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take the boat out in the open somewhere and spin that dude around a few times. These boats will nearly do a complete circle just using the wheel and throttle from reverse to forward.

the bumper in the water sounds like a good idea. It really takes abunch of practice and time, Be slow and patient and you guys will get it.

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coming from an I/O, these boats are completly different. One thing to remeber is that the front seems to sway, but yet the boat will stay on coarse. I was trying to make corrections like I used to with my I/O and it does not work.

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I agree with all of the above, but can add two things:

1. Do not be afraid to say: "I've botched the approach up so badly that my only choice is to back off completely and start again." Hurts to say it and you may take some crap from other boaters, but ignore them. You will get better.

2. The depth of your trailer is crucial to loading (and unloading) your boat. Each varies to some degree, but for me, I place the top of the wheel fenders righ at the water line and all is well. If I go deeper or shallower than that, it gets ugly quite fast.

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Slow and steady is the name of the game.

Just like the others said, take it slow and practice practice practice! Bump the throttle in and out of gear and do NOT oversteer. This is the biggest problem my dad has. He has the slow part down, but he truns the wheel WAY too much. He ends up coming in all caddywampus (sp?) and trying to correct with sharp burst of throttle. No good... Especially on approach to the trailer you do not want to oversteer.

I personally do not like the phrase, "your boat only backs up to the right" Because, If you are backing up long distances you can steer. But, yes, just by putting your boat in reverse it does pull to the right.

Here is a neat trick for pulling up along side a dock. Docking on the starboard side, aproach the dock at about a 45* angle. When the bow gets near to the dock, put it in reverse and turn the wheel all the way to the right. This pulls the back in and now you are docked! You can put it into forward to correct if you are too far out. This is called "walking" the boat and with some practice you will master it and it will become second nature.

Edited by zad0030
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Slow and steady is the name of the game.

Just like the others said, take it slow and practice practice practice! Bump the throttle in and out of gear and do NOT oversteer. This is the biggest problem my dad has. He has the slow part down, but he truns the wheel WAY too much. He ends up coming in all caddywampus (sp?) and trying to correct with sharp burst of throttle. No good... Especially on approach to the trailer you do not want to oversteer.

I personally do not like the phrase, "your boat only backs up to the left" Because, If you are backing up long distances you can steer. But, yes, just by putting your boat in reverse it does pull to the right.

Here is a neat trick for pulling up along side a dock. Docking on the starboard side, aproach the dock at about a 45* angle. When the bow gets near to the dock, put it in reverse and turn the wheel all the way to the right. This pulls the back in and now you are docked! You can put it into forward to correct if you are too far out. This is called "walking" the boat and with some practice you will master it and it will become second nature.

That is indeed THE trick to dock starboard, the youtube link is pretty clear.

My question is, Does anyone know a trick to "walk" the other way?

Luis

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Slow and steady is the name of the game.

Just like the others said, take it slow and practice practice practice! Bump the throttle in and out of gear and do NOT oversteer. This is the biggest problem my dad has. He has the slow part down, but he truns the wheel WAY too much. He ends up coming in all caddywampus (sp?) and trying to correct with sharp burst of throttle. No good... Especially on approach to the trailer you do not want to oversteer.

I personally do not like the phrase, "your boat only backs up to the right" Because, If you are backing up long distances you can steer. But, yes, just by putting your boat in reverse it does pull to the right.

Here is a neat trick for pulling up along side a dock. Docking on the starboard side, aproach the dock at about a 45* angle. When the bow gets near to the dock, put it in reverse and turn the wheel all the way to the right. This pulls the back in and now you are docked! You can put it into forward to correct if you are too far out. This is called "walking" the boat and with some practice you will master it and it will become second nature.

That is indeed THE trick to dock starboard, the youtube link is pretty clear.

My question is, Does anyone know a trick to "walk" the other way?

Luis

What I do when coming port side is. Run alongside the dock if possible at about maybe 15 degrees or so, give or take. Use short bursts of reverse to stop and then keep the wheel right and put into forward to swing the back in.

For all docking its best to have people there to catch. Especially if its in rough water or tight quarters.

Edited by zad0030
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Slow and steady is the name of the game.

Just like the others said, take it slow and practice practice practice! Bump the throttle in and out of gear and do NOT oversteer. This is the biggest problem my dad has. He has the slow part down, but he truns the wheel WAY too much. He ends up coming in all caddywampus (sp?) and trying to correct with sharp burst of throttle. No good... Especially on approach to the trailer you do not want to oversteer.

I personally do not like the phrase, "your boat only backs up to the left" Because, If you are backing up long distances you can steer. But, yes, just by putting your boat in reverse it does pull to the right.

Here is a neat trick for pulling up along side a dock. Docking on the starboard side, aproach the dock at about a 45* angle. When the bow gets near to the dock, put it in reverse and turn the wheel all the way to the right. This pulls the back in and now you are docked! You can put it into forward to correct if you are too far out. This is called "walking" the boat and with some practice you will master it and it will become second nature.

That is indeed THE trick to dock starboard, the youtube link is pretty clear.

My question is, Does anyone know a trick to "walk" the other way?

Luis

Ski Nautique, I believe.

Edited by TheBlackPearl
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i think your issue is something we have all had to deal with and still deal with when showing someone how to operate the boat.

Yea, but how many of you learned on a $60k boat? I've been driving boats for 20 yrs & still get nervous everytime I drive someone's LSV. I learned on a $3500 boat & after 20 yrs I'm still only up to bangin up a $40k boat.

That is indeed THE trick to dock starboard, the youtube link is pretty clear.

My question is, Does anyone know a trick to "walk" the other way?

The trick is to go opposite of what the video says. Go into the dock with it on the left side, turning right even more than you would the other way, almost overdo it, then goose it very small amounts in reverse. The longer you stay in reverse under power, the more it pulls, so stay in reverse small amounts, over & over.

This takes even more practice than doing it the other way & is really tough in windy or choppy conditions.

Edited by Bill_AirJunky
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I always come in slow @ 45 degrees and throw it into reverse...nowhere to go but to the dock...reach down and hold on while boarding and unloading. Piece of cake. don't come in so fast that your rollers follow you in and your Golden!

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until you get comfortable, dont put the trailer all the way down in the water at first. Leave it a little shallow and drive the boat up on it and let it settle and straighten itself out....then have your partner back in a bit so you can get it the rest of the way onto the trailer. works like a charm!

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i have this problem to

im only 16 and my pronlem is putting it on the trailer smoothly.

i come in perfect but once the nose of the boat goes between the guide bars it goes sideways

and i have no control over it plz help

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So some dealer didn't take a first time inboard boat owner out with their brand new LSV?

Call the dealer and have them do a "water delivery"...they can show you how deep to put the trailer, how to dock, etc. Pretty common practice unless a dealer is selling to an experienced owner/repeat customer.

-Chris

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This is my first season driving an inboard boat and I have watched a lot of videos and it is going well so far. However if the dock is crowded or it's really rough water I prefer to tie a bow line and float my boat on the trailer with the motor off while my dad or brother centers it up between the polls and then wench it up tight. I don't have a problem driving it on the trailer usually but there is no reason to beat your boat up for nothing.

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until you get comfortable, dont put the trailer all the way down in the water at first.

Tough to do on a river with any current. ie; the Willamette in Portland or the Colorado in Parker. You'd have that boat sideways as soon as it hit the bunks.

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