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No Wake Zone

Winterization

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No Wake Zone

I have my boat in the GA mountains on Lake Burton. It was 65 degrees this weekend and I couldn't resist the urge to de-winterize the engine (Monsoon, 21 LSV). Everything went fine and even took the boat for a quick 10 min spin. So the question in my mind now is did I de-winterize it too soon. The temperatures should be between 50 and 70 during the day. It shouldn''t drop below 32 at night but if it does, how far below 32 does it need go and for how long for it to do damage to the engine. Or will I be ok.

Anyone have a guess?

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chadwick02

Well, water freezes at 32, so technically speaking, 32...

That being said, early or late season I'll put a "drop light" with a 100w light bulb under the engine and closed up the hatches if its gona drop below freezing over night. I throw a wireless thermometer in the engine compartment on the opposite side of the light. The coldest night I've ever done this on hit the mid 20's, and the coldest it got in the engine was in the low 40's. If it gets any colder than the mid 20's I'll move the boat from the boat garage (unheated) to the garage connected to the house (which is\can be heated). I've never had any problem with my heater core, and that is not kept warm by the light. Mid 20's is where I draw the line, even with a 100watt drop light. I cant say as though I'm even 100% comfortable with the light. I always make sure I have a new and heavy-duty bulb in there, if it were to blow that would be a problem...

So, it all really depends how well you want to sleep at night?

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Bill_AirJunky

I'll open everything that is easy to get to, engine plugs, exhaust, etc. and blow it out with compressed air, then dry start the motor for a few seconds & use a drop light. Never had a problem.

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winddawg

The service light option is a good one that I have used many times with no problems for light freezing weather. Duration below the freezing mark is also important.

One other thing that you can do if you know it is going to be a cold night is run the engine and get it up to temperature using a fake a lake. This will not only heat up the engine but also the tranny and v-drive. Drop the light in the compartment for the night and it will stay warm.

Now for your ballast tanks and heater, I haven't figured that one out yet.

-Dave

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sp0tts

I throw a small flood light in the engine compartment and one up under the drivers seat on nights it's gonna be below freezing. My boat is kept in a barn that has no heat. I've gone out some mornings to shut off the bulbs and the thermometer I keep in the engine compartment usually reads around 60 degrees. It's going to take lower temps than 32 for a pretty decent timeframe to really crack your block or heater core. I have a friend that keeps his outside and usually just pulls the plugs and drains the block unless it's gonna hit mid 20s (he doesn't have a heater) - he's had no problems yet either. We normally ride March thru November up here at least.

Edited by sp0tts

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areamike
I throw a small flood light in the engine compartment and one up under the drivers seat on nights it's gonna be below freezing. My boat is kept in a barn that has no heat. I've gone out some mornings to shut off the bulbs and the thermometer I keep in the engine compartment usually reads around 60 degrees. It's going to take lower temps than 32 for a pretty decent timeframe to really crack your block or heater core. I have a friend that keeps his outside and usually just pulls the plugs and drains the block unless it's gonna hit mid 20s (he doesn't have a heater) - he's had no problems yet either. We normally ride March thru November up here at least.

Same thing we do. We de-winterize early here as well. At the very least we pull the plugs and drain the block and blow out the heater core. Only take 10 minutes and to me that is worth it... Thumbup.gif

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vette-ski

Time below 32 is the key. To crack a block, the passages need to be froze solid, not just slushy or a thin crust. That can take a while. If you are seeing 70 during the day I don't think it would be possible for it to crack over just one night. Although it's your boat and you can't always believe everything you read on the net. Put a cup of water next in the boat and keep an eye on that. If the cup starts getting solid, then you might want to drain the motor.

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No Wake Zone

Thank you and great advice. It is a second home so hard to watch it closely when I am away. I will use the drop light idea for the next couple of weeks until I am for sure out of the woods (so to speak).

Thanks again.

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