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Thoughts on this article?

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natebroll

Headline: Former Kerrville resident shares story of 9-year-old son’s death as warning 

Partial text: 

“His COHb was 72 percent. His so-called ‘drowning’ was secondary to the fact that he never would have lived at that level. What does that mean? It means Andrew was not going to live regardless of what happened next. He was at the back of our Malibu Skier most of the day. Boats, even moving, create a backdraft of exhaust. That’s right. Exactly what I’ve typed: carbon monoxide exits the rear of the boat and drafts right back into the back of the boat.

“Backseat riders are especially vulnerable at low speeds and in long no-wake zones like the one we had to cross to return to the docks.”

https://www.hccommunityjournal.com/article_2c3903cc-f1fb-11ea-9314-0f8c02b6e971.html

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TallRedRider

I cannot imagine her grief.  

He may have died no matter what as she says, but 30 minutes on the bottom of the lake seals the deal pretty much every time.  He should have been in a life vest until on the shore.  The carbon monoxide made him faint, the time underwater is still the cause of death.  It is interesting to me that this is the same story for carbon monoxide deaths almost every time.  I have not heard of someone dying from carbon monoxide in a boat who did not spend an extended amount of time under the surface.    

 

Edited by TallRedRider

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Bradley Thornton

Safety First

All new boats should require some type of system not an option. 

People with old boats should add it and if you have kids it should be pushed by friends for you too. 

Fresh Air Exhaust has done many test on this.  This is an easy one to see.

Addendum_A.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1gv9oDQuP6AEE3

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rakr

It seems like I’ve seen this on a few older inboards. 
 

It seems like even the turn down tips help a bit, but also I’m assuming the cats in the newer boats help as well.

do the older boats not have cats, or are they less effective at removing CO? It looks like the Indmar ExCats came out in 2007, and an article said they were much better at removing CO. 

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oldjeep

Sorry, but the article reads like someone preparing to sue someone or pass blame over their child who drowned while they were not paying attention.

Harsh, maybe.

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Nitrousbird
21 hours ago, rakr said:

do the older boats not have cats, or are they less effective at removing CO? It looks like the Indmar ExCats came out in 2007, and an article said they were much better at removing CO. 

No cats; not a thing until somewhere in the mid-late '00's.  My '01 doesn't have them.

I am betting this was a carbed boat.  Probably running rich as hell at idle and spewing fumes worse than any normal running EFI  boat.  This being a direct drive, the hit was sitting much closer to the back than he would have in a Vdrive as well.  All contributing factors.  

Facts:
- Life jacket would have saved the kid from drowning, regardless of whether he would have later died anyway
- Kid would have likely been fine doing the same thing sitting at the back of a Vdrive, regardless of how the boat was tuned/running
- Kid would have had a better chance in an EFI boat and a better chance in a newer cat-equipped boat
- Kid would have been fine in any combo above if the boat had a FAE installed.  

End result is this was a preventable accident.

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Steve B.
22 hours ago, TallRedRider said:

I cannot imagine her grief.  

He may have died no matter what as she says, but 30 minutes on the bottom of the lake seals the deal pretty much every time.  He should have been in a life vest until on the shore.  The carbon monoxide made him faint, the time underwater is still the cause of death.  It is interesting to me that this is the same story for carbon monoxide deaths almost every time.  I have not heard of someone dying from carbon monoxide in a boat who did not spend an extended amount of time under the surface.    

 

He was under the water for 30 minutes ?  I didn't want to post anything remotely negative about this tragic story, but some of the wording just seems kinda off. Again, my heartfelt sympathy goes out to the young man, his family and friends.

Steve B.

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TallRedRider
3 hours ago, Steve B. said:

He was under the water for 30 minutes ?  I didn't want to post anything remotely negative about this tragic story, but some of the wording just seems kinda off. Again, my heartfelt sympathy goes out to the young man, his family and friends.

Steve B.

The article says he was a strong swimmer and that he went into the water 'without even trying to swim' or something to that effect.  Also the media (and they always do their homework, I know) said that he drowned.  Mother said she did not want to dispute the drowning narrative until she had the autopsy results, so I think we can safely conclude he was found dead in the water.  My 30 minutes was definitely an assumption, but even 5 minutes underwater starts to kill brain cells.  

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