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Self Service


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dizzygti
Posted (edited)

Who here does their own service?   Are there things that need to be done that are not called out in the maintenance schedule?   Thanks in advance

Adding more detail since not getting much feedback....

What items not on the maintenance schedule are assumed to be required maintenance checks?   For example, my rudder box has a zerk fitting, but there is no mention of greasing it in the maintenance schedule.   I recently found a nut missing from the engine motor mount and saw it in the bilge.   Service department is saying they're not responsible because they would have checked the motor mounts at every 50 hour interval and that verifying alignment now is my responsibility since I do my own service.   Having things not called specifically on the maintenance schedule seems like a huge gray area that just lets dealerships skirt warranty issue....  What else is there to check on a regular basis that isn't documented?   Thanks in advance.

Edited by dizzygti
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I did all of it on my 2013.  Only time it went back to the dealer was to trade it in.  There are a few more items on the new boats that may or may not be a bit more complicated, i.e. coolant, fuel filter, etc. that I will take a crack at when the time comes.  I am on a lift year round and try to avoid taking the boat out of the water unless I really need to...  The biggest challenge is being enough of a contortionist to be able to reach all of the components.  Doing it yourself saves $$$, but also time off of the water in my opinion.

Outside of the maintenance schedule, just looking around for problems.  For example, a couple of years ago on my 2013 if felt a bit of a clunk / slop when checking to see that the prop / shaft was rotating freely (by hand).  This led to to find all 4 coupling bolts pretty loose.  Quick easy fix that prevented an issue from becoming a problem.

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dizzygti
14 hours ago, amartin said:

I did all of it on my 2013.  Only time it went back to the dealer was to trade it in.  There are a few more items on the new boats that may or may not be a bit more complicated, i.e. coolant, fuel filter, etc. that I will take a crack at when the time comes.  I am on a lift year round and try to avoid taking the boat out of the water unless I really need to...  The biggest challenge is being enough of a contortionist to be able to reach all of the components.  Doing it yourself saves $$$, but also time off of the water in my opinion.

Outside of the maintenance schedule, just looking around for problems.  For example, a couple of years ago on my 2013 if felt a bit of a clunk / slop when checking to see that the prop / shaft was rotating freely (by hand).  This led to to find all 4 coupling bolts pretty loose.  Quick easy fix that prevented an issue from becoming a problem.

I'm over 300 hours and done everything myself so far.   The fuel filter and dealing with coolant are not really "difficult" on the newer motors.   I'll update my original post since I probably wasn't clear in what I'm looking for.   

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I check the torque on the throttle body, plenum, and exhaust about every 5 years. Closing in on 700 hrs. Changing plug wires next week. I'll let you know if there is an improvement.

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Since some maintenance schedules focus primarily on the powertrain, many unrelated boat components get overlooked.  This is a fairly comprehensive (but not engine specific) 100 hour/annual inspection list.

https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/qv4rabswmgn3qp4es7hof/100-Hour-Inspection-Checklist.pdf?rlkey=uawu1xztio5jzosfyz60v85o5&dl=0

 

I would also recommend checking the following items annually:

  All of the battery cable connections (selector, buss bars, breaker panels, engine, etc...)

  All deck/hull screws and fasteners, especially the windshield. 

  All tower and bimini fasteners, and operation. 

  Canvas condition.

  Steering cable or hydraulic fluid, fasteners, and steering components. 

  Inspect hull and running gear for damage.

  ECM calibration updates.

  Display controller software updates. 

  Trailer brake fluid condition, contamination check.

  Trailer chasis and brake system fasteners.

 

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formulaben
17 hours ago, dizzygti said:

Who here does their own service?

I started out doing very little, and now I do it all.  You're in the right place here!!  Nobody will take care of and maintain the boat like the owner will.  If you feel like it's above your competence level, don't.  With all the great members here sharing the info from years of experience you'll have the benefit of a tremendous head start.  Buy some decent tools, watch some videos, and jump in.  It's actually a lot of fun!

:werule:

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dizzygti
37 minutes ago, csleaver said:

Since some maintenance schedules focus primarily on the powertrain, many unrelated boat components get overlooked.  This is a fairly comprehensive (but not engine specific) 100 hour/annual inspection list.

https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/qv4rabswmgn3qp4es7hof/100-Hour-Inspection-Checklist.pdf?rlkey=uawu1xztio5jzosfyz60v85o5&dl=0

 

Thank you, some of it is common sense but it's much more comprehensive than the owner's manual maintenance schedule.    I assumed I bought a brand new boat, so the engine alignment should be perfect and not something that changes over time unless work has been performed.    I see I have an alignment to perform before my next outing....hence my question in the other alignment thread.   

11 minutes ago, formulaben said:

I started out doing very little, and now I do it all.  You're in the right place here!!  Nobody will take care of and maintain the boat like the owner will.  If you feel like it's above your competence level, don't.  With all the great members here sharing the info from years of experience you'll have the benefit of a tremendous head start.  Buy some decent tools, watch some videos, and jump in.  It's actually a lot of fun!

:werule:

Oh I'm well aware of the intended communal mindset of a good technical forum.  It's why I hate Facebook groups that replaced actual forums.   I am a mechanical engineer, automotive engineer in former roles, and have built engines in my garage.  There's no lack of ability, just knowledge, and I'm growing the latter.   I just can't stand to pay shop labor rates on things I can do myself.   If the dealership business model relies on me for service, they're in trouble!   

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When checking alignment, my money is always on it needing adjustment, even right off the delivery truck.  Too much flex, movement, settling, vibration, you name it... it will cause a poor engine alignment.  The maximum gap allowed on the coupler is 0.003", which is about the thickness of a human hair.  I can't believe how many I actually find that are actually rubbing on another component.  The engine alignment and trailer are the most neglected things I usually see.

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