Jump to content

Welcome to TheMalibuCrew!

As a guest, you are welcome to poke around and view the majority of the content that we have to offer, but in order to post, search, contact members, and get full use out of the website you will need to Register for an Account. It's free and it's easy, so don't hesitate to join the TheMalibuCrew Family today!

How to best tie up using fenders in a wet slip.....loose or tight? with or without fender covers?


BPAUL1033

Recommended Posts

BPAUL1033

I have an awesome 23 LSV that I keep in a wet slip all summer.  When I pulled it out of the water last fall I noticed there were faint rub marks from my fenders (newly purchased).  I'm wondering if I'm tying "too tight" to the dock and "squishing" the fenders too much such that they rub on the gelcoat consistently.  Any advice out there whether to tie up "loosely" with space between the dock/fender/boat or tie up "tight" with no space between the dock/fender/boat. I also purchased fender covers/socks to help prevent this....any thoughts on using these to prevent the rub/marks on the gelcoat?

Link to comment

You want a bit of space and ideally if dock on each side of the boat tie it centered so it doesn't touch the dock at all. BUT your main issue is the fenders them selves, there's no way around it traditional fenders scuff dark gel. Best solution is a set of ball fenders such as BABZ, offer way more protection and are soft enough not to scratch. 

BABZ

Link to comment
BPAUL1033

To clarify...I can only tie to one side.  I share a double wide with a neighbor. 

Link to comment
ahopkins22LSV

I would be looking at options to permanently attach something to the dock itself. Ideally to only make contact on the rub rail of your boat. Since you can only tie to one side, you’ll want the boat secured pretty tight with bow, stern and spring lines. But it will inevitably move some. If you have to use fenders Babz is a good option or I was be looking for large TaylorMade ones, larger than they recommended for a 23’ boat and if they are going to stay above the water line I’d cover them in the microfiber covers. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment

i vote a little loose, but agree with @ahopkins22LSV that if the pilings are tall, and you are allowed to, i'd mount big dock fenders on them so only the rub rail bounces off them (that's what i do for my other boat, especially cause i deal with tides, and fenders hanging off the boat get caught as you go up and down).  the other answer is mooring whips; slightly more expensive than a couple fenders, but they are great for keeping boat in place. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Posted (edited)

Is the slip well-protected from wind and waves?  If so you can go a little tighter.  If you have to deal with a lot of movement, you need to go lose.  I use Ronix happy hour inflatable fenders on my boat, and they have a cover over them.  However, they do deflate over time so depending on your use case it might not work for you.  When you say you leave the boat in the slip all summer, do you mean you literally leave it in the water all season long or just have it in the slip/water on the days you use it?  If you leave it in the water all summer, a little fender rash is nothing compared to the mess you will have on the hull from marine growth.  :-) 

 

Edited by EchelonMike
Link to comment

I second the mooring whips.  No reason to have the boat touch the dock at all.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
CDAWake

We keep ours in a slip all summer, but it is a single, so I can’t really speak to tying up on a single side. I will say though that some fender covers will help the gel coat problem. Those light rub marks come right out though with a little buffing. 

Link to comment
BPAUL1033

So no real moorings to speak of.  The boat literally sits in the water all summer.  The lake is small, and the marina somewhat protected, but the boat bob around.  

My current set up is to string 3 26" fenders (now with covers) in between the boat and the dock. So those also sit in the water.  The dock is way below the rub line on boat.  

2022 LSV.  Blue and white.  Blue is below the water line at the back of the boat, but mostly it's white in the water.

I use Boat Juice to clean before/after and once during the season when I pull the boat out for a trip. I have used the Boat Juice "ceramic" coating as well.  

 

 

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...