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New Impeller Every Year?


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The19thHole

The service department at my Malibu dealership is recommending that I go ahead and get a new impeller while they do a summerization of my boat in Central Texas.  I literally just had the impeller replaced in July 2022 and he said it's either 100 hours or 1 year, whichever comes first.  I have maybe put 5-10 hours max on the boat after the new impeller.  This seems crazy to me.  Searching for the manual for the recommended maintenance, but just curious of anyone's thoughts?  I am all for proper maintenance, but I also don't want to be scared into paying more than I should.

 

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I used to do it every year, now I do it every 2. Hasn't been an issue. Just carry a spare and the tools so you can do it on the fly if need be.

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ahopkins22LSV

If you only put ten hours max on it after replacing it last year I would not replace it. Should be perfectly fine and as mentioned just carry a spare because it is something you can do on the water.

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Indmar scheduled maintenance recommends impeller inspection every 100 engine hours and replacement every 300 engine hours or once every year (whatever comes first).  During training, Indmar instructors recommended that the impeller be changed at the beginning of the season as opposed to the end of the season. 

Will yours last two years?  Possibly, maybe even probably.  It really depends on its current condition.  The impeller can be changed on the water, but access to it is a bit difficult on the MXZ models with the 6.2L Ford, especially if you drop one of those tiny cover plate screws.  Flushing pieces of a failed impeller out of the engine oil cooler and transmission cooler is not fun.

Its preventative maintenance and cheap insurance in my opinion, but do whatever feels right for you.

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1 hour ago, The19thHole said:

The service department at my Malibu dealership is recommending that I go ahead and get a new impeller while they do a summerization of my boat in Central Texas.  I literally just had the impeller replaced in July 2022 and he said it's either 100 hours or 1 year, whichever comes first.  I have maybe put 5-10 hours max on the boat after the new impeller.  This seems crazy to me.  Searching for the manual for the recommended maintenance, but just curious of anyone's thoughts?  I am all for proper maintenance, but I also don't want to be scared into paying more than I should.

 

Depends on your goal, prevent or respond.  The more you can do yourself the more flexibility you have. If you can change one out on the fly, then skip a year or two. I have found it to be age not hours, three was too long. I don’t use my boat regularly so maybe I have more dry starts than someone with a boat on a lift that is used weekly.

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I probably don't need to, but I do mine every year.  Cheap insurance IMO.  I will say if you carry an extra, make sure you have some extra lube on the boat to help get the old one out.  I had a hell of a time getting mine out a couple weeks ago without getting some lube in the impeller to help assist.

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About every five years for me and they come out looking like new. I put a P-Touch label on the cover with the date when I change mine, like I do with any maintenance item. I have the luxury of easily removing the cover for inspection though which I do before spring start up.

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I just replace it every year - cheap and easy.  For sure that's overkill, but peace of mind.  If I did go to a longer interval I would for sure remove it for the winter storage months and keep it in a baggie with some type of appropriate lubricant applied to the rubber.  Just doesn't seem great to leave it dry and scrunched up for the entire off season.  Again, I'm definitely one for overkill on maintenance, but my 2 cents for what its worth.

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Every other year but it would depend on the number of hours you use your boat.  Lately kids sports and college recruiting is getting in the way of me getting much more than 50 hours per year.

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I change mine at the beginning of every season.  My boat uses the Johnson 09-812B, about a $30 part (currently $33 at Bakes).    

Using an impeller puller, which I highly recommend, and a proper wrench (I use a thumbwheel ratchet), it takes maybe 5 minutes of my time (and I, too, have a v-drive).

I certainly wouldn't pay the dealership's ridiculous price to replace it, though.  Learn to DIY.   

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I take mine out every winter, put it in a bag on the dash.  Check in spring and re-install if it looks good. Any signs of cracking it gets replaced.

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Changing yearly is better than having it shower your trans cooler with debris - takes a lot more time to clean that out vs a planned change (ask me how I know!)

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I always kept one as a spare.  We would change them out every other year.  We typically put around 200 hours a year on the boat.  I only every needed the spare one time.  And the failure wasn't the fins, it was the glue that held the rubber to the brass star pattern that slid over the shank.

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Mine last a couple of years although I have found them to have a high level of variability.  One dry start will trash them pretty fast, so as noted always keep a spare in the glovebox.

@The19thHole - the fact that your boat accumulated very few hours would concern me more than one that was consistently used.  Reason, the housing had lots of opportunity to dry out which is a death knell to an impeller.  If it were my boat, I would take a look at the impeller before I started the boat and at least give it some vaseline/dish soap prior to starting.

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  • 2 weeks later...

every year, when putting everything back together.  its cheap and the old one is already out. 

carry spare is a good idea also. 

 

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I go from the hours recommendation of 100 hours.  I don't winterize so it stays wet all winter and keep it in the water most of the boating season with little trailering.  I always keep a spare on board just in case but have never needed it.  Every 2 years I usually end up hitting the 100 hours and they come out looking almost new.

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