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First Time Malibu LSV Owner Tips?


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I am a first time 2020 Malibu Wakesetter 22LSV owner (and excited about it!) with limited historical general boating/time on water.  Any good tips you learned to pass on to first timers (e.g., must have accessories, must do tips, of just fun ideas)?  Anything you learned the hard way that you wish someone told you up front?  Thanks in advance for any thoughts or replies!  Pumped to be part of this group and look forward to contributing in the future  

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Congratulations on your new boat.  You will make countless memories, and unfortunately you will be hooked for life. :-)

First tip is to plan ahead.  These boats handle like battleships at low speed.  Turning in reverse is non-existent unless you have Stern Turn.  When I trailer the boat I put the trailer in just below the tops of the fenders and walk the boat on.  It may not look as cool as driving the boat up on the trailer, but much better than getting turned by the wind and missing the bunks.  

Second, when getting your surfer or wakeboarder, don't be in a rush to return to them.  Pull throttle to idle, wait for your wave to pass you, then turn around and return to your rider.  If you turn too soon you will get swamped by your own wave.  If you accelerate too much returning to your rider the surfgate will deploy, making it hard to steer.  I tell my part time drivers to remember that slow is smooth, and smooth is fast. 

Lastly, have fun and stay safe.  I can't imagine summers without our boat.  

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wakesonthesnake

Take a small crew out the first few times, preferably with someone who has experience.  It takes a bit to get your routine down, you can write out a check list of things to do the first few times if need be.  Things like plugs, turning on the batteries, undo transom straps, etc.  Then when there are a bunch of distractions it will be automatic.  If you are married make sure to get your wife involved in launching and retrieving right away.  In my family I drive the truck and my wife handles the boat for launch and retrieval.  She takes care of the interior prep and cleaning and I do all the outside things.

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TwoMargaritasPlease
On 8/27/2021 at 9:59 AM, guitarcrazy said:

Second, when getting your surfer or wakeboarder, don't be in a rush to return to them.  Pull throttle to idle, wait for your wave to pass you, then turn around and return to your rider.  If you turn too soon you will get swamped by your own wave.  If you accelerate too much returning to your rider the surfgate will deploy, making it hard to steer.  I tell my part time drivers to remember that slow is smooth, and smooth is fast. 

Good advice! I would add that it's easier to turn to the side opposite the wave. So if you're surfing left, turn around to the right.

And if you're taking out friends, get them in the habit of bringing the beer.

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when surfing... after the rider falls, put boat in neutral, count for 3 seconds then place boat in reverse, then throttle up. It helps the time to get back to rider and you avoid the roller you created and swamping your boat.

 

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MalibuNation

When picking up a rider whenever possible pick them up on the driver's side that way you can see them better.  Also better learn terms like Port and Starboard :lol:

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This is a good video and the more on your lake that do it right the better!  The only thing we do differently is the signal to pull, we do a verbal "Yep!" since the driver might have eyes elsewhere.  

 

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Few more good ones.  I always tell my wife, don't approach anything faster than you're willing to bump it.  When in doubt, slow down.  

Also, not sure your backing skills but a big empty mall parking lot and some time is a good investment if you aren't yet comfortable backing.  

 

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7 hours ago, martinarcher said:

Few more good ones.  I always tell my wife, don't approach anything faster than you're willing to bump it.  When in doubt, slow down.  

Also, not sure your backing skills but a big empty mall parking lot and some time is a good investment if you aren't yet comfortable backing.  

 

 

Lots of good advice in here. Don’t power turn and especially not to the side your surfer was on. It will not let you go that way. If surfing left, power down, and turn right until the waves pass. It’s the fastest and safest way to get back… and will also keep hundreds of gallons of lake water out of the front of your boat. 

Use the ballast as trim tabs. It helps filling the front a bit when riding kids at slow speeds. Using the wedge on lift mode also not to be underrated. Will save you at least a few hundred RPM’s. 

Boat only goes right when in reverse. Plan accordingly. Docking left is possible though. Approach dock with normal speed, make a hard right turn (more than you need), then correct it with reverse and right to bring the stern back in parallel with the dock. When in doubt, so slow and never be afraid to punt and start over. You get a lot more credit for doing that than slamming the boat on dock. 

For surfing in a 22, it can get way overweighted in the stern with the PnP bags full. Better to start with running ballasts at 75% and always make sure there’s at least 1 adult in the bow. 

When swimming of the back deck, add +50% to the rear ballasts and empty the front. It drops the swim deck to at or below the waterline making it easy for anyone to get back on the boat on their own power.

If you have younger kids, I recommend getting to HO FAD’s to tow behind boat. 

Just remember that no one in the boat is wearing seat belts, so don’t be like my brother and dad and use evasive maneuvers from Top Gun when performing basic functions. Slow and smooth keeps people happy. 

Even for a life time boater, our 22 reinvigorated our love for the sport and our kids are all in. 

Edited by BarliBear
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On 8/28/2021 at 10:08 AM, wakesonthesnake said:

Take a small crew out the first few times, preferably with someone who has experience.  It takes a bit to get your routine down, you can write out a check list of things to do the first few times if need be.  Things like plugs, turning on the batteries, undo transom straps, etc.  Then when there are a bunch of distractions it will be automatic.  If you are married make sure to get your wife involved in launching and retrieving right away.  In my family I drive the truck and my wife handles the boat for launch and retrieval.  She takes care of the interior prep and cleaning and I do all the outside things.

Good Advise Here.

Get a couple of good Walkie Talkies ( not the cheep ones you give to the kids at Christmas) This will keep you from YELLING  at each other when retrieving the boat. 10-4

Edited by Rack
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My best advice is to take your time, don't rush.  Be prepared and make a list, let others help that's what they are there for.  Don't be embarrased or angry when you make a mistake because you will make plenty.  

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Lot’s of great suggestions here. Two things that can’t be reinforced enough: 1. Even highly experienced boaters make mistakes, regularly, learning from them is key. 2. Take your time, hurrying, distractions, pressure = mistakes.

One huge factor in boating is wind. While wind direction and velocity cannot be controlled, paying attention to it can make all the difference in the world. As others have said, piloting an inboard is different than stern drives and outboards, over time you’ll develop a feel for how the boat behaves. When approaching anything, dock, trailer, rider in the water (especially) choosing the correct direction and angle can make wind an ally or adversary. If you’re on a river or chain of lakes current can be a big factor in addition to wind.

Most of all, enjoy the time with your crew, both current and the one you will meet and bond with going forward!

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Be courteous. ….what that entails isn’t always obvious.  Someone will yell at you for something you didn’t know you were doing wrong.  Just learn from it.  Be aware of where your surf waves are headed and how close you are to other boaters, docks and shorelines.  Many people are looking for reasons to outlaw surfing….and if they get it done it usually includes all towed water sports.  

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