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DOJOLOACH2

Replace trailer or sell boat and upgrade?

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DOJOLOACH2

I need a second opinion on these bearongs, drums, and hubs. What do you all think? I spent over half an hour trying to remove the rear bearing seals but no luck.

Plan is to do bearing maintemance and hook the brakes up today

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justgary

Two ways to remove the rear seal: 1) Use a large screwdriver under the lip of the seal and pry it out.  This will probably bend the seal if it is stuck too badly.  2) Turn the hub seal side down an support it on something so the seal is raised and use a drift from the other side to drive the bearing out, which will take the seal with it.  Gasoline or diesel are decent choices for cleaning the old grease out of everything.  Obviously, you should be careful if you choose gasoline because of its explosive nature when ignited.

Your photos are not good enough to tell if the bearings are pitted.  Basically, if the cleaned bearing will run in the race with no bumpy or gritty feel at all, it is probably good.  If the bearings do not run freely, you need to replace the race as well.  The hub should have grooves inside that allow you to drift the race out.  Honestly, bearings are a commodity and pretty cheap.  If in doubt at all, replace them and put a new seal in.  Definitely put in a new seal even if your bearings are still good.

When you drift in the new race, be sure it seats fully in the hub all the way around.  I usually use either a brass or cold rolled steel drift.  The race is stupid hard and you will not dent it.  I usually preload the bearings overtight when I install them to make sure the races are seated.  I turn the nut with a wrench while I am turning the hub and keep going until I can't turn the hub (even with a wheel on it).  Then I back it off and stop at the desired preload so that the hub will turn freely but not have any side play.

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Pra4sno

Or just use a seal puller, they are under $10.  Tap in the new seal with a black of hardwood to get it flush without dinging or damaging the seal.  

Is this trailer marked as a "Hensley" Trailer?  Can you post the bearing number?  If so I can send you the notes you will need on components if you don't already have them.  The hubs in mine were standard fare when it was built (parts still readily available), but the components from modern standard axle sizes do not fit.  

If the bearings and races have scoring, that is the indicator you need to replace them.  As mentioned the bearings and races are exceptionally hard steel, so with most or our trailering use, if things have been done right and there is ANY serviceable grease in the hub they should be serviceable.  If you do need to replace the bearings and races, as mentioned use a brass drift OR take the old race and cut through the hoop with your grinder and clean up the edges with a file.  Then set the fresh race in and lightly tap it into the hub.  Then set the old 'cut' race on top of it and tap the new one in with the old one.  If a steel drift/punch skips onto the race you'll mar it so if you choose to tap it in using one, do so with caution.  

"How I was taught" Bearing seating and pretension steps:

1.  Seat hub, install bearing washer and tension nut.  

2.  Tighten tension nut to 45 ft lbs.  Rotate hub backwards by hand a few turns, rotate hub forward by hand a few turns.  Loosen tension nut to almost completely loose but not backed off completely or the bearing might unseat.

3.  Tighten tension nut to 10 ft lbs.  Rotate hub backward by hand a few turns, forward by hand a few turns until a lug is stopped at the 12 oclock position.

4.  Hooking a fishing scale on to the lug at the 12 oclock position, and pulling forward - parallel with the ground, check pre-tension.  At 10ft lbs on the tension nut you are likely going to barely register. 

5.  Continue adding 5 ft lbs of tension to the tension nut, and checking pretension with the above process until you reach 3-4 ft lbs of pretension, or factory spec as listed.  

6.  Install lock/claw washer if used, and place lock nut on top of it.  

7.  Tighten lock nut to 45 ft lbs.  

8.  Bend up one - two tabs on lock/claw washer using a narrow brass drift.  

9.  Skip step 3-5...set tension nut to 5-15 ft/lbs, do the 'spin check' and finish up the job.  *Probably*, largely the same result. 

The reason for going through the pretension checking process with a trailer, PARTICULARLY with a single axle with older bearings, is that if you set both bearings to the same tension nut torque setting, the bearings may not be at the same pretension.  Bearings can and do wear unevenly.  Drastic differences in pretension can cause a trailer to drift at high speeds.  

Too low of tension on a bearing, it will 'wobble' in the race causing excessive heat and potential failure.  You will see if this was the case when you service the bearing as the bearing washer (the one with the "D" shape that slides over the spindle) will have rotational scoring on it.  Too much pretension will cause excessive heat build up which can cook the grease.  Lots of friction results and the bearing fails or starts making a lot of noise and then fails.  It's not a science but you can get a pretty accurate result with the fish scale and feel good about it.  

Test driving the trailer after service is ALWAYS a good idea.  Run with the trailer at a typical highway speed for around 10 minutes.  If you have an IR thermometer, gun the hubs.  You should expect something around 100-130 degrees, but can get as high as 150-160 with no issues over extended periods of run-time.  If you don't have a gun, just check them with your hands after 10 minutes of highway use.  If they are too hot to hold on to, something might be up.  Keep in mind if you live in Florida and you're testing your hubs on a 95* day in sun on a hot roadway, you will show higher temps.  

 

The previous owner of my boat had never maintained the trailer, and I knew when I bought it the surge brake system was shot.   He had been frustrated by the reverse lockout not working the year before I bought it and said he just over-reacted one night and cut the master cylinder line.  That allowed water in and everything had corroded.  I ended up overhauling my entire trailer from top to bottom last year and spoke with trailer builders, a local trailer service shop, and the component manufacturers of the parts I used, and while it was on a budget, I have been really happy how everything turned out.  

I use my boat exclusively in fresh water, so I chose to rip everything out and start over from scratch as it was cheaper and less maintenance.  I installed a submersible electric brakes on the trailer which included new brake drums/hubs with fresh bearings and races.  It has been one of my favorite upgrades as I tow up and down slopes with an older Land Cruiser.  It has been completely problem free and a huge improvement in stopping distance compared to other surge brake boat trails that I've owned.   Happy to share if you're interested.  

Edited by Pra4sno

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DOJOLOACH2

Thans for advice guys, no slop, gouges or anything seem pretry new. Now for the bad news....

I tried to blow out the stainless bralelines from the T on the axle. Woulda done it from the wheel cylinder but those bolts are not comimg off l used 80 psi with no luck. Im thinkimg am upgrade to new brake lines and while. At it just go ahead and buy new bearings.

Master cylinder is good and somewhere netweem now amd a few months back when i moved, i lost a couple roller wheels the rear pin goes through to keep master cylinder from moving.

So plan is ( unless recomme ded otherwise) buy new cylinder rollers, brake lines. Bearings. Im the pics above i assume the drums and wheel cylimders look ok?

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Pra4sno

Your left brake adjustment screw looks seized, and the right one looks to have been replaced before.  

My advice is to measure the inside of the drum edge to edge and get a replacement shoe kit with springs, adjuster barrels and the works.  It is so much easier to work with new components and trailer parts are CHEAP.

E-trailer is my go-to but others may have different recommendations.  I have found their customer service to be very fantastic.

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justgary

 

2 hours ago, Pra4sno said:

E-trailer is my go-to

Yup, e-trailer.

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DOJOLOACH2
2 hours ago, Pra4sno said:

Your left brake adjustment screw looks seized, and the right one looks to have been replaced before.  

My advice is to measure the inside of the drum edge to edge and get a replacement shoe kit with springs, adjuster barrels and the works.  It is so much easier to work with new components and trailer parts are CHEAP.

E-trailer is my go-to but others may have different recommendations.  I have found their customer service to be very fantastic.

Oh boy sound s challenging. Wonder how long it will take

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Pra4sno
2 hours ago, DOJOLOACH2 said:

Oh boy sound s challenging. Wonder how long it will take

Should take the same amount of time as you'll have to remove everything to replace the brake cylinders anyways.  

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DOJOLOACH2

Cool ill let you guys know how it goes. 

This project wont be for another month now that boating season is over for me lol. 

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Sparky450

It also might be a good time to look at changing over to disc brakes. 

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DOJOLOACH2
14 minutes ago, Sparky450 said:

It also might be a good time to look at changing over to disc brakes. 

Hadnt thought about that but those would be easier. I see myself getting 5 years more our the trailer or so

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Steve B.

I too would purchase new bearing and seal sets. They are so cheap and it will give you peace of mind.

Steve B.

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DOJOLOACH2
6 minutes ago, Steve B. said:

I too would purchase new bearing and seal sets. They are so cheap and it will give you peace of mind.

Steve B.

Yep theyre in my cart. Going to ask around to see if the brake drums are salveagble. From there ill make the decision to go with discs

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DOJOLOACH2

I assume ive got a 3500lbs axle but will Double Check

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Pra4sno

Your drums and shoes look serviceable, but to get the install kit often it needs to come with new shoes.  They will still match the hub.  

 

Keep in mind the bearing numbers/ids are going to be required for you to buy any new hub related parts as newer standard hubs are different than standard hub sizes from over 20 years ago.  Easy to reference using them.  

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