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MaseBeebs22

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MaseBeebs22

Hello everyone,

My family and I recently enjoyed our first weekend with our new 23' LSV. What a weekend! I appreciate everyone's help when we were looking into purchasing the boat. 

My family is quite new to boating. We are going to the lake again on June 20th. I want to make sure we are getting into the habit of boating with best practices especially when I won't be present. I'm not necessarily talking about best practices while we are on the water but by making sure we are completing the little tedious tasks that most individuals might brush over without extensive knowledge.

For example, what should a proper inspection look like before taking off on the water? What should we be checking for?  

Also, we're looking for a Lilly Pad. What brand do you recommend using. I've seen the new inflatable ones made by Sentry. Thoughts on those? We certainly want it to be easy to roll up and tie or pack down. 

What anchor do you recommend? Someone at the pro shop at the lake we boat on said to not use an anchor. He said to just coast and readjust every so often. He said if I do get one that it should be a mushroom anchor so we don't scratch up the boat. However, I've mainly seen everyone post about using a danforth anchor. Thoughts?

 

 

 

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Eagleboy99

Like dad used to say "No one ever got hurt by going slow".  DO NOT rush anything- loading/unloading etc.

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Rednucleus

Don't forget the plug!!

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smileysteve
8 minutes ago, MaseBeebs22 said:

What anchor do you recommend? Someone at the pro shop at the lake we boat on said to not use an anchor. He said to just coast and readjust every so often. He said if I do get one that it should be a mushroom anchor so we don't scratch up the boat.

Most of the time just parking away from shore should be fine for a 20 minute swim. I'll add some swimming exercise and pull it by the nose to keep it near us. Bow always pointed towards waves.

A mushroom anchor won't do much, and you're about as good as leaving it unanchored. It's just held by weight and will slide on any bottom.

The most recommended anchor is a box anchor though, it collapses small, but most importantly requires 1/3 the scope (angled rope distance) as a traditional fluke anchor. Store in a carpeted area (or canvas bag if you want) to avoid scratches (though this hasn't ever been an issue for me)

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blk93jeepzj

What lake?

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MaseBeebs22
4 minutes ago, blk93jeepzj said:

What lake?

Tablerock Lake in Missouri. Pretty deep. 

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blk93jeepzj
22 minutes ago, MaseBeebs22 said:

Tablerock Lake in Missouri. Pretty deep. 

My home body of water.  We use a 20lb navy anchor.  It works well with the rocky bottom and trees that are still in the lake.  Yes I know that the box anchor is everyone's go to on the TMC but when you anchor in 30-100+ feet of water and there are lots of trees to grab it, I'll stick to a cheaper anchor because it's just a matter of time till ya loose it. 

 1087554683_navyanchor.jpg.c7e81cda3807f9be8e6a4b15b9efeafc.jpg 

Also use one of these reels to hold close to 200 feet of rope.

324710730_anchorreel.jpg.1fbc8685311efe712af283cda4bdc615.jpg

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truckjunky87

We've had a couple drowning over the past years around us where the victim was blown off a paddle board or boater went for a swim and sudden wind hit a blew the boat/paddle board away from them.  When we jump in for a swim life jackets go in the water with us and we use an anchor.

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lukehartwig

Pre - Launch check list:
 - Engine/Trans/V-drive oil checks
 - Battery switch on and Volt checks
 - Bilge Blower check
 - Stereo check
 - Quick start check
 - Bimini up
 - Plug in (usually leave the plug out until right at the ramp)

Anchoring protocol:
Home lakes are all shallow. I use a cheapo mushroom anchor. Tie my anchor to a heavy chain, then an "Anchor Buddy" to the chain, tie that to the bow hook. If we're near the beach, I'll park a few meters off the shoreline (feet still touching the sand) and run a slide-hammer anchor up on shore in addition to the mushroom anchor. I can't say enough about the anchor buddy. It's great in mostly calm waters, probably wouldn't recommend on a choppy lake. 

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smileysteve
1 hour ago, truckjunky87 said:

We've had a couple drowning over the past years around us where the victim was blown off a paddle board or boater went for a swim and sudden wind hit a blew the boat/paddle board away from them.  When we jump in for a swim life jackets go in the water with us and we use an anchor.

We need to get back to drownproofing! If you can't float for a few hours without anything holding you up, you shouldn't be in the water without a life jacket...  if you should be in the water at all.

But yes, you should have a life jacket available if you're paddle boarding. Though, I don't understand how someone can be physically fit enough to paddleboard but not swim to the board - and if you're standing up, conditions can't be that bad? And if conditions are bad, not using an ankle strap? And in the freak accident case of a head injury, most vests can't guarantee you keep your head above water.

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ORMailbuboater
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, MaseBeebs22 said:

Hello everyone,

My family and I recently enjoyed our first weekend with our new 23' LSV. What a weekend! I appreciate everyone's help when we were looking into purchasing the boat. 

My family is quite new to boating. We are going to the lake again on June 20th. I want to make sure we are getting into the habit of boating with best practices especially when I won't be present. I'm not necessarily talking about best practices while we are on the water but by making sure we are completing the little tedious tasks that most individuals might brush over without extensive knowledge.

For example, what should a proper inspection look like before taking off on the water? What should we be checking for?  

Suggest you make up a check list that  you follow each and every time you to out.   Eventually will be done by memory.  This is pretty much what I do every time I go out.

1) Check to see the drain plugs are all in.  (Eventually all of us will miss putting in the plug.) 

2) Removal of rear transom straps.

3) Inspect the engine compartment,  Check the engine oil.  Any leaks visible?  Fan belt looks good, etc...  

4) Battery switch is on.  Turn on the blower for min 4 minutes.

5) Walk around the outside of the boat and trailer.   

6) Loosen bow strap but not remove.  (I know some do.  Seen a boat slip off down a ramp.  Not for me)

7) Tie on docking ropes.  One aft one on the bow.  Makes controlling the boat on the dock much easier.  Don't always need but it is a habit.

8) Back down the boat till 3/4 in the water.  Have driver start up in the water.  All is good then remove the front strap.   

9) Once boat is off trailer.  Boat driver waits away from dock.  Puts on fenders for docking.   Once driver spotted run boat in pick.  Go boatin! 

 

Quote

What anchor do you recommend? Someone at the pro shop at the lake we boat on said to not use an anchor. He said to just coast and readjust every so often. He said if I do get one that it should be a mushroom anchor so we don't scratch up the boat. However, I've mainly seen everyone post about using a danforth anchor. Thoughts?

Maybe your lake is too deep for anchor to hit the bottom.  Mushroom anchor to slow movement is a good idea.  If you are in water that can use an anchor 40-50 feet.  We use a Box Anchor.  Love it.  Collapses down and fits nicely under the seat.  

https://www.slideanchor.com/boxanchor  

 

image.thumb.png.fd1849e23484511f9a62ae7e6ae6d569.png

Edited by ORMailbuboater

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Elkinsa

All good things above. You asked about a Lilly pad. We don’t take ours out on the water with us very often so we just grabbed one from Costco. Big enough and kids can spend all day on that thing. Rolling it up tight can be a two man job and secure it to the back of boat and go. Works for us. If we were out on the water all day though I would probably look at one that can blow up. 

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Mattyb

Totally agree with what has been said in terms of pre flight check.  As for a lilly pad, we have this one:

https://www.amazon.com/Airhead-AHGP-6-AIRHEAD-GANG-PLANK/dp/B00AJVLFE0/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=inflatable+water+pad&qid=1560211679&s=gateway&sr=8-8

 

Mostly use it attached to a dock for the kids to mess around on.  not a rigid as other I have seen, but pretty cheap compared to them as well.  Used almost every weekend last summer, and its still looking pretty solid.

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Stevo

The $120 floating island from Costco has lasted us several years and doesn’t disappoint 

1E34604E-97F9-4762-98F5-1F981E9ADA74.jpeg

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hethj7

I love Tablerock (headed there next weekend).  As for Lilly Pads, they are awesome when they are out.  But they are a pain to roll up and transport.  I don’t know if the one linked below would be as fun once deployed but it no doubt would be easier to move around   

 

https://aquastackmat.com/

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Sparky450
6 hours ago, Mattyb said:

Totally agree with what has been said in terms of pre flight check.  As for a lilly pad, we have this one:

https://www.amazon.com/Airhead-AHGP-6-AIRHEAD-GANG-PLANK/dp/B00AJVLFE0/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=inflatable+water+pad&qid=1560211679&s=gateway&sr=8-8

 

Mostly use it attached to a dock for the kids to mess around on.  not a rigid as other I have seen, but pretty cheap compared to them as well.  Used almost every weekend last summer, and its still looking pretty solid.

Is this similar to the one Costco has/had. Some friends had one similar to this from Costco. Another friend bought one this year. And I have yet to find it. They are pretty nice. It was linked here last year, I didn’t pull the trigger and have missed out. 

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riffraff
Posted (edited)
On 6/7/2019 at 12:57 PM, lukehartwig said:

Pre - Launch check list:

 - Check coolant level, if equipped (i.e. the new M5di & M6di engines)

 - Check Sea Strainer (again...new M5di & M6di engines)
 - Engine oil (before starting)
 - Battery switch on and Volt checks
 - Bilge Blower check
 - Stereo check
 - Quick start check

 -  Trans/V-drive oil checks (after fluid is heated - run boat for 5 mins then shut down for accurate reading - although this isn't really practical at a boat launch!)
 - Bimini up
 - Plug in (usually leave the plug out until right at the ramp)

Anchoring protocol:
Home lakes are all shallow. I use a cheapo mushroom anchor. Tie my anchor to a heavy chain, then an "Anchor Buddy" to the chain, tie that to the bow hook. If we're near the beach, I'll park a few meters off the shoreline (feet still touching the sand) and run a slide-hammer anchor up on shore in addition to the mushroom anchor. I can't say enough about the anchor buddy. It's great in mostly calm waters, probably wouldn't recommend on a choppy lake. 

 

Edited by riffraff
added 'oil'

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BigCreek
Posted (edited)

Rock and trees at depth, I'm a huge fan of the break-away feature of the Digger Anchor. It's not cheap, but it has "saved" itself a number of times for me. The pics definitely don't do it justice. If you pull hard on the rope, the U-shaped portion of the anchor releases to swing loose, then the anchor just comes free from what seemed to be stuck at the bottom forever. 

https://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Max-3006-6623-BoatTector-Digger-Style/dp/B01B1MT2JU/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=digger+anchor&qid=1560259574&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Then, treat yourself to a Danik Hook. They seem costly, but they slide right on the transom U-Bolt hook, and you'll never tie a knot in your anchor rope again. 

https://www.amazon.com/Danik-Hook-Stainless-Knotless-System-Personal/dp/B00JGZGTDC/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2KVXEPP1O63OF&keywords=danik+hook&qid=1560259812&s=gateway&sprefix=danik+hoo%2Caps%2C153&sr=8-3

If you are on a deep lake and are going to be reeling in 90 feet of rope, get thick rope - minimum 5/8" but bigger is better. The slimmer stuff is harder to grip.

Edited by BigCreek

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JeffC

Agree on the checklists already posted... I always do a walk through/walk around before I launch.   It quickly seems a bit retentive after you get experience, but (not?) surprisingly have found stuff more than once that I forgot.  If someone asks you a question and breaks your routine (it WILL happen), you will forget something.   My wife and I also have a standard set of things we both do - on both launch and recovery.   She backs the trailer in, I launch the boat, and bring it back to the dock.  

A few other thoughts for you...

  • Get you and your #1 crew ALL familiar with all tasks... especially backing the trailer, launch and load to the trailer (trust me, your first windy day will make getting on the trailer ... ... well, ... fun).   Practice trailer maneuvering in a parking lot somewhere.   Lay out some cones (milk jugs??) and work it until it starts to become second nature.   You need more than just yourself capable of ALL the tasks.    
  • Dont be afraid to ask your crew to help.   Ask directly, with clear instructions.   Since I was familiar with boating, I found myself giving very poor instructions (like put the fenders out).  I didnt think about the fact that non boaters dont know what a fender is, or which side is port, and which is starboard, or how to install them (old boat was tie to cleats, new boat is insert in Phender Pros).
  • If you have new crew on board, go over safety before you leave the dock.    Where are the life vests?   Where is the fire extinguisher?  Where is the first aid kit?  Air horn/whistle?  etc etc.   What to do in an emergency - life vest, get off, and away from the boat quickly.   While it may seem unlikely that they need that, far better to review when there is no stress than to be barking orders if/when an emergency arises. 
  • Always, always, always start the blower.   Im thankful that the new boat starts it automatically when I power up the boat.  But my old boat didnt.    Amazing how easy it was to forget that step, and the consequences CAN be catastrophic. 
  • Write down your list... I had mine on my phone, but a nice laminated card would have worked well too... 

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ajive

$0.02 from me.  The mushroom will work if you have some current and a rocky bottom, otherwise probably not.  I've also lost a mushroom due to a really good rock before... Just couldn't get it free... The break away box anchor that was mentioned above is really the peak anchor IMO, but you don't want to let your drunk buddy pull it up and let one of the points gouge the gel.

Another anchor pointer... It's common for people to lean back and use the rub rail as a rope guide.  That will totally scuff the gel.  Get your strongest friend to pull it straight up.

On the launch checklist (have a mental hitching check list too... I made it a mile down the road the other day and realized that I hadn't dropped the lock.  That could have been BAD...), the first response was may favorite.  Just go slow and be consistent, you are clearly thinking about the process so just make sure those that are helping you understand what you expect.

And last, but certainly most, more marital strife occurs at a boat ramp than anywhere I've ever been.  If you're wife/girlfriend (or whatever, if I'm being sexist) is your primary #2 just do your best to find your center during this stressful time and make sure she knows what's going on before you get there and start barking orders.  

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