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rakr

Maintenance, a daunting task

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rakr

This is more of a comment than a question. 

Being a new boat owner, and seeing a few little things on my 2013 VTX, the idea of being stuck in the lake not being able to start to boat or get the PW up, etc. is a bit horrifying. 

I guess this is a case of I’m “learning” a bit reading old and new posts, but realizing I really know little to nothing.

fuses, relays, and Medallion... oh my...

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P6Expert

When I first got into boating in 2009, I was a nervous Nellie the first few times out on the lake.  Was that sound normal?  Did I put the plug in?  Did I set my anchor correctly?  Will we be able to load the boat back on the trailer without damage?   As you can tell, boating was not so much fun at first.  There were a few times when my wife would not speak to me after loading the boat (I was really stressed then).  We are much better now.

Over time, you will get to know your boat and begin to be less worried about problems that do not exist.  That noted, you should still be prepared when out on the lake.  I always take my small tool bag and mask and snorkel with me when out on the lake.  Also, my wife and I have a mental check list of things we need to do before launching and  loading the boat.  This mental check list has help relieve stress when we could talk about the things we need to do and to make sure those things were done.  Check list included: battery switch ON, Blower ON, straps OFF, plug IN, etc.  Give yourself time to get acquainted with you boat and over time you will have more fun on the lake without worrying about getting stuck on lake. 

Also, reach out to other boat owners if you need help (especially when at the boat ramp).  Others have been helpful to me and over time, I like to think that I have been helpful to others.  It is all about having a great time on the lake.  Enjoy.

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P6Expert

Also, Youtube is great place to learn about boat maintenance.  I learned how to change the oil on my boat from watching this Youtube video (saved me over $300):

 

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shawndoggy

You are reading and learning. I don’t think you need to be able to tear down and rebuild your engine or anything, but consuming information on here about “common” issues and also having an understanding of how the boat works can really enhance your abilities, which I turn will give you more comfort. And having a toolbox on the boat can definitely help too. 

I have definitely been able to fix / troubleshoot small issues from time to time based on info I have picked up here.

For the most part these aren’t terribly complicated machines (haha assuming you aren’t tearing down and rebuilding the engine of course).

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rakr
28 minutes ago, Falko said:

except 2013 VTX

I literally spit coffee out when I read this... I don't know which post was better. This one, or the Malibu Skier ad you posed recently.

Outside of the flat tire fiasco (first day pulling the boat), and getting the MTC replaced, it has been fun so far, but definitely a bit unsettling thinking about how much could go wrong at any given time. This forum and being behind the boat definitely helps!

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P6Expert
16 minutes ago, braindamage said:

especially don’t get mad or yell at your family in these situations, even if it is their fault you are in a mess. Getting mad and hurting them won’t help your situation. Just deal with it and you can teach later when you aren’t in the heat of dealing with it.

Amen to that.

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John I.

Spend time in, around, and under the boat with a goal of understanding the function of all the various components. You don't need to become an expert mechanic/technician, but get familiar enough that you recognize when something is in need of repair. Performing your own routine maintenance is a great way to do this.

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rakr
1 hour ago, braindamage said:

You and your crew’s safety is the primary concern. If everyone is ok and the situation can’t reasonably turn unsafe then relax.

Safety first, always. I got all my safety "fixin's" pretty quickly after I got my boat. life jackets, ropes, anchor, horn, paddle... I think technically I still need a throwable.

When I was in college we skied on a river that had a dam about 1/2 mile down river from the course and jump. The boat not starting was a concern as a couple people died that went over the dam, 2003-ish. From what I remember, it was a guy whose father owned a marina, and he and a prospective buyer(s) were out on a test drive, engine cut out. I believe they were closer to the dam than they should have been. The 2nd passenger jumped off, swam a rope to shore to try to stop the boat as the remaining passengers tried to get the boat started. He and the prospective buyer went over the dam and never came out...

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