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shiftman

Is an 07 Vride a good choice for someone like us?

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shiftman

Hello to all: My wife and I are not wakeboarders, but we both love the looks of most all wakeboard boats and specifically the older (07, etc.) Wakesetters with the forward facing towers. Recently, I ran across an 07 Vride (which I was not familiar with) and really liked the looks. The boat is a vdrive 21 footer with redone upholstery and has about 750 hours on it. Essentially, we are looking for a glorified "water taxi" to replace our cramped and very rough riding 2014 Stingray bowrider that is only 18 feet long. Given that I know very little about wakeboard boats in general, and nothing about a Vride, I wanted to ask here to see what I might learn. We made a bad purchase with the Stingray and do not want a repeat occurrence.

Thanks for any replies.

 

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wdr

The “Ride” in VRide in no way implies a good ride in comparison to a deeper “V” hull like on your Stingray. The 21 V may ride better, but only because it is a longer and heavier boat than you Stingray. If you are looking for a good riding water taxi as you say I would stick with the I/Os. Also a wakeboat will most likely be more expensive than an equal sized run about. JM2C

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wdr

Bottom line is to take a test ride to see if you like the ride and go from there.

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Norm02
21 minutes ago, shiftman said:

Hello to all: My wife and I are not wakeboarders, but we both love the looks of most all wakeboard boats and specifically the older (07, etc.) Wakesetters with the forward facing towers. Recently, I ran across an 07 Vride (which I was not familiar with) and really liked the looks. The boat is a vdrive 21 footer with redone upholstery and has about 750 hours on it. Essentially, we are looking for a glorified "water taxi" to replace our cramped and very rough riding 2014 Stingray bowrider that is only 18 feet long. Given that I know very little about wakeboard boats in general, and nothing about a Vride, I wanted to ask here to see what I might learn. We made a bad purchase with the Stingray and do not want a repeat occurrence.

Thanks for any replies.

 

We just bought an ‘05 V Ride three weeks ago and we absolutely love it.  IMO, it’s a great beginner wakeboarding boat in that it’s not overkill for those of us that are just getting into Wakeboarding and Wakesurfing.  

So far we’ve skied, surfed, and tubed behind it and it has done everything that I could ever ask for at this point.  That being said, I did a ton of research and found a VERY nice one with 507hrs on it.  

The Malibu dealer that I bough it from had been servicing the boat for several years so I knew that it had been well maintained.  Even with that being the case, I still demo’d the boat before signing on the bottom line.  I would absolutely suggest that you do the same and that is irregardless of what boat you end up wanting to buy.

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shawndoggy

What conditions do you boat in?  If the water is rough, that boat SUCKS.  It has a very flat bottom and will beat the fillings out of you.  It also has relatively low freeboard by today's wakeboat standards, so if the water's rough, not only will you get pounded, but you will also need to pay attention to not take water over the bow.

As a wakeboat on flat water it's great... very good low speed wakeboard wake, wakeboard wake gets big with weight, surfable (esp. with a suction surf device), fuel efficient (at least by today's wakepig standards), etc.  Propped right at sea level, you can expect to hit high 40s (screaming at redline).

(former 06 vride owner)

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UWSkier

Agree with others.  If you think your Sea Ray rides rough, wait til you're out in heavy chop in a static hull.  You can't trim these things to tune for rough water.  If you like the wake boat look but need a nice comfortable ride in moderate to heavy chop, look for a fakeboard I/O like a Regal with a tower or something.

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Nitrousbird

If you aren't doing watersports a Vride is poor choice (as are most inboards).  There are better cruisers for less money...that is not the primary purpose of these boats.  

They can cruise nicely but you can spend less on a proper I/O that will be faster, ride better and use less fuel for your purpose. 

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Gavin17

How exactly do you use the boat and why was the stingray a bad purchase? 

If you like going fast on rough water an inboard may not be for you.  Inboards are nice to drive and easy to maintain but typically cost more and burn more gas than a similar io.

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shiftman

Thanks for the info. It is greatly appreciated. I likely need to go the I/O "fakeboard" route. I split my boating between small calmer lakes in East TN.,. and the bigger rougher Ky. Lake in Western Ky.

Even though my Stingray is a "V" hull, it rides high out of the water and you feel every ripple of water. In fact, my big Wave runner rides much better. 

That said, thank you all very much for your sound advice. .......)

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shiftman
7 minutes ago, Nitrousbird said:

If you aren't doing watersports a Vride is poor choice (as are most inboards).  There are better cruisers for less money...that is not the primary purpose of these boats.  

They can cruise nicely but you can spend less on a proper I/O that will be faster, ride better and use less fuel for your purpose. 

There is just something about a Wakesetter that has always caught my eye. Much like a Vette is to some folks., But I cannot argue against your logic.

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shiftman
9 minutes ago, Gavin17 said:

How exactly do you use the boat and why was the stingray a bad purchase? 

If you like going fast on rough water an inboard may not be for you.  Inboards are nice to drive and easy to maintain but typically cost more and burn more gas than a similar io.

The Stingray was a bank repo that I bought without riding in it first. Rookie boat buying mistake. If there is moderate chop, your back will hurt after a day on the water. Absolutely horrible riding boat on anything but smooth water.

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oldjeep
56 minutes ago, shiftman said:

The Stingray was a bank repo that I bought without riding in it first. Rookie boat buying mistake. If there is moderate chop, your back will hurt after a day on the water. Absolutely horrible riding boat on anything but smooth water.

Stingray is a decent boat, but built light.  You want something heavier like a chapparal, cobalt, crownline.  You think your ride is rough now, you dont want an inboard  my 19 ft bayliner was a much smoother riding boat in chop than my vtx. 

Edited by oldjeep

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-BS-
6 hours ago, shawndoggy said:

What conditions do you boat in?  If the water is rough, that boat SUCKS.  It has a very flat bottom and will beat the fillings out of you.  It also has relatively low freeboard by today's wakeboat standards, so if the water's rough, not only will you get pounded, but you will also need to pay attention to not take water over the bow.

As a wakeboat on flat water it's great... very good low speed wakeboard wake, wakeboard wake gets big with weight, surfable (esp. with a suction surf device), fuel efficient (at least by today's wakepig standards), etc.  Propped right at sea level, you can expect to hit high 40s (screaming at redline).

(former 06 vride owner)

Wow.  I don't agree with any of what's being said here (insert shock here________).  :lol:   

I would say that if a guy wanted to use a wakeboat as a runabout, that era of Vrides is about as good as it gets, especially considering the price point.  Other boats in that price point would be what? Older Moombas or Centurions, with a LOT less freeboard (and quality)

@shawndoggy

Low freeboard?  Guys surf them with +/- 2250# on ONE side!   Sure, compared to a 100k new wakeboat (surfboats really) it has low freeboard, but so does the USS Enterprise. 

Water over the bow unweighted? I mean,  I'm sure it's possible...... I guess??  But I put 500 hours on my 07, and I've spent a few hundred more in an 05.........and I've never seen it.  And the water can get pretty big onThe Columbia.  I def realize the water can get really big on the lake too, so I'm not discounting your experience, I just think it's a matter of perspective and how big is BIG water.....  Tahoe on a windy day is about as big as it gets, eh?  Not your typical "rough water" IMO.

And when compared to an 18' Stingray, it's going to ride like a freaking Cadillac.  I don't know how long it's been since most of us have been in an 18' runabout, but it is a MISERABLE ride.

I agree with the fact that a wakeboat isn't as good of a choice for a runabout ..........as a true runabout, but isn't that obvious? 

 

My answer would be to go test drive the boat and see what you think of the ride.  IMO, it's going to be a HUGE upgrade, in every respect except gas mileage, to an 18' Stingray.  If you like the amenities of a wakeboat (seating configuration, storage, quality of interior, ability to surf/wakeboard/etc now and then, sporty feel) I personally think that Vride is a great place to start. @shiftman

 

 

Edited by -BS-

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UWSkier

welcome back @-BS-

We had a lighweight sport runabout on a performance hull prior to our Malibu.  If you trim it right, it's fine on moderate chop that absolutely kicks your arse in the Malibu.  I stand by the statement that there are much better boats out there for the use case than the Vride.

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shawndoggy
2 minutes ago, -BS- said:

Wow.  I don't agree with any of what's being said here (insert shock here________).  :lol:   

I would say that if a guy wanted to use a wakeboat as a runabout, that era of Vrides is about as good as it gets, especially considering the price point.  Other boats in that price point would be what? Older Moombas or Centurions, with a LOT less freeboard (and quality)

@shawndoggy

Low freeboard?  Guys surf them with +/- 2250# on ONE side!   Sure, compared to a 100k new wakeboat (surfboats really) it has low freeboard, but so does the USS Enterprise. 

Water over the bow unweighted? I mean,  I'm sure it's possible...... I guess??  But I put 500 hours on my 07, and I've spent a few hundred more in an 05.........and I've never seen it.  And the water can get pretty big The Columbia.

And when compared to an 18' Stingray, it's going to ride like a freaking Cadillac.  I don't know how long it's been since most of us have been in an 18' runabout, but it is a MISERABLE ride.

I agree with the fact that a wakeboat isn't as good of a choice for a runabout ..........as a true runabout, but isn't that obvious? 

 

My answer would be to go test drive the boat and see what you think of the ride.  IMO, it's going to be a HUGE upgrade, in every respect except gas mileage, to an 18' Stingray.  If you like the amenities of a wakeboat (seating configuration, storage, quality of interior, ability to surf/wakeboard/etc now and then, sporty feel) I personally think that Vride is a great place to start. @shiftman

 

 

have you ever been caught out in big water in that hull? vs the newer bigger boats?  I have.  10mph into the wind, wishing for a kidney belt, with water spraying over the windshield.  While my friend in a 2010 lsv cruised away from us.  I don't know how it's possibly debatable that the OG Vride has a flat hull?

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-BS-
1 minute ago, shawndoggy said:

have you ever been caught out in big water in that hull? vs the newer bigger boats?  I have.  10mph into the wind, wishing for a kidney belt, with water spraying over the windshield.  While my friend in a 2010 lsv cruised away from us.  I don't know how it's possibly debatable that the OG Vride has a flat hull?

Have I been caught in big water in that hull?  :lol:   C'mon Doggy.  I probably have 800 hours on The Columbia in that hull.  And yeah, of course I agree that a MUCH heavier......MUCH longer ......MUCH more expensive wakeboat is a smoother ride than a shorter, lighter wakeboat.  Is that what's being asked here, though?

He's coming from an 18' boat that weighs close to half of what that SV23 hull does and is a full 3 feet shorter.  That Vride is going to be a dream ride compared to an 18' boat.   His stingray doesn't track half as well and doesn't cut through ANYthing.

Now, if we are talking about a 21' Reinell or 21' Cobalt or 21' Crownline I/O.............yeah, that's probably going to be a nicer ride than the Vride when trimmed properly...

The other thing I think we're ignoring here is that if you're a passenger in your average runabout....... you're sitting on a cheapo 2" seat cushion that's too short and has a back that is at, what seems to be, a sub 90* angle.  

Anyway....I'll say this: I went from a pretty nice 21' Reinell into an 07 Vride........and I thought it was an upgrade in every sense.  And a 21' Reinell is a pretty nice runabout.

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-BS-

Full disclosure: I've got a 2009 Vride for sale :lol:   

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shawndoggy

forgive me... I thought your boat is the 2nd gen vride, NOT the OG vride (OP asked about 07) which is the same as the early 2000s vlx?  your boat and the boat the OP is asking about are not the same boat.

I don't think my post actually compared the vride to his boat, but rather said that as a standalone runabout it wasn't great.

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-BS-

Ugh.  This place.

Shawn.  Buddy.  I had the 2007.  I put 500 hours on it.  I sold it.  LBJ had the 05.  We put countless hours on that one.  He sold it. They are BOTH on the SV23 hull.  These are both the exact same hull the OP asked about.

(Yes,  I realize my 09 Vride is the first year with the V25 hull, which is 6" longer and has a 4" wider beam.) 

 

And sorry if I read that wrong.  But I thought you said your 2006 Vride struggled in big water as a 2010 LSV cruised away.  That's a #4500, 23' boat, right? At minimum? (Or maybe it was the 24'-7" version of the LSV?).  Who knows........but I definitely missed the part where you said "my Vride struggled in big water as an 18' Seaswirl cruised away into the sunset with all aboard sipping piping hot cups of coffee".

 

I fully agree that a runabout is the best choice for runabout use.  Obviously.  But I didn't think that was his question.  I thought the OP was digging on a modestly priced wakeboat to use for the same purposes.  IMO, the older Vrides are PRECISELY where I'd start that search.   Anyway....

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shawndoggy

@-BS- I said this, which you disagreed with:

Quote

It has a very flat bottom and will beat the fillings out of you.  It also has relatively low freeboard by today's wakeboat standards, so if the water's rough, not only will you get pounded, but you will also need to pay attention to not take water over the bow.

please note that that statement is not in comparison to anything other that newer wakeboats (which I did not go on to suggest would make good pleasure cruisers either).

In rough water, or a storm, it's not a pleasant boat to be in (compared to myriad other 21' options the world has to offer).  Your experience is obviously different.  So I guess that makes you right.  It's not flatbottomed, and has plenty of freeboard even when the water is rough.

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Gavin17

My 23lsv is a way better rough water boat than our 18' io. But it is much larger and heavier. Almost any 23' io would perform better in rough water.  

If rough water ride and fuel economy aren't your top concern you may love a malibu. They're great boats. I think they are way more fun and easy to drive than an io. Once you get past the learning curve they're easy to dock and maneuver in tight places.  A tower full of boards on a windy day will always make it tough though. 

They're easy to work on and often just better built boats. V drives also hold their value well so the financial risks is about as minimal as boat buying can be.  We went from an io to malibu 3 years ago and all my friends prefer driving the malibu even though Id expect a bigger heavier Inboard to be more of a challenge.   

Not to mention lots of people without a water sports background get hooked on wake surfing.  

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Gavin17

On a choppy day we cruise below 15mph with the bow high in what I call plow mode.  Its comfy enough of a ride but not fast or fuel efficient.  On choppy days I try and avoid cruising.  

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UWSkier

I guess it's all in the hull design.  Our previous boat was one of these.

1995-concord-boats-mach-i-americanlisted

Sporty, light, shallow, with a hull that would dig in and turn like no boat I've ever driven, or get up and fly 70 MPH with only the prop and cavitation plate in the water.  Tiny wake and would rip your arms off on holeshots.  In 2' chop, you could cruise at 40 MPH in this thing all day with the trim adjusted correctly.  The water would be breaking about 2/3rds of the way back on the windscreen and you'd just be riding the wave tops.

Boat before that was one of these.

ud0861-p.jpg

19 footer.  DEEP V.  Pig out of the hole but an unbelievable ride on plane regardless of water conditions.  Had that one in 5' swells on Winnebago once.  That was a little scary when I was a kid but even in BIG water, it was a decent, and dry ride.

The Malibu is a 2001 SV23 Diamond hulled 21' V drive.  Same size as the VRide only with the Diamond vs Wake hull.  It doesn't ride in chop anywhere near as smoothly as the other boats we've had.  And it's a wet ride too when it's windy and choppy.

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Nitrousbird

I want to add to the discussion above, I get to ride on a 247 LSV for a few days every year on Lake Norman, which gets choppy in the wind and weekends.  It rides MUCH better than our SV23 hull, which likes smooth water.  The SV23 still rides way better than the 17' I/O I had previously.  That said, on a windy day you are still feeling the spray on the 247, especially when sacked out surfing.

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-BS-
1 hour ago, shawndoggy said:

@-BS- I said this, which you disagreed with:

please note that that statement is not in comparison to anything other that newer wakeboats (which I did not go on to suggest would make good pleasure cruisers either).

In rough water, or a storm, it's not a pleasant boat to be in (compared to myriad other 21' options the world has to offer).  Your experience is obviously different.  So I guess that makes you right.  It's not flatbottomed, and has plenty of freeboard even when the water is rough.

:lol: You're funny.  Shawn: I'm only "right" in the respect that I'm responding to the OP's specific situation/question.......... while you're comparing a 07 Vride to "newer" wakeboats with monstrous hulls and equally monstrous price tags. 

He said he liked the Malibu styling and was trying to get away from his rough-riding, cramped, 18 footer. The 07Vride will effectively DOUBLE his seating capacity (assuming nobody wants to ride in the bow).......DOUBLE his storage capacity.......and provide a vastly smoother ride.  Agree OR Disagree?

Again.  Yes.  A runabout is the ideal setup for.......umm......running about.

That said, there are plenty of reasons to choose a wakeboat over a runabout, even when using solely for recreational cruising/boating.  Prop safety with little ones.  Easier to swim off (the average runabout "swimstep" is molded into the hull, although some have true swimsteps).  More storage. More comfortable/spacious seating area.  More flexibility for water sports.  Tower. Etc. Etc....

 

OP: Another option would be looking at that next biggest Malibu hull; the V25. Pre 2009 Wakesetters (at least back to 05) will give you 6" more length and 4" more beam.  Even with just those few inches, it's a much bigger hull.  It'll be a better ride, but sucks more fuel. 

Edited by -BS-

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