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SayReponse

My dream boat

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foxriverat

Congratulations! Great slalom tug. I have a 2000 Response lx. Hard to beat the wake for us slalom skiers.

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braindamage

She’s a beauty!! Great first post with pics. Congratulations and welcome to the ‘crew!!

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Rednucleus

What a beauty - wish I was a bit closer!! Reminds me of my old 95 Sanger DLX - that was a great boat.

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Ccceric

Oh man! That makes me want to grab my ski!  My buddy had one of these and there was nothing better than a quick tug at 0700!  Congrats!!!!

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ahopkinsVTX

Congratulations! Beautiful boat. Those have some of the best lines on the water. 

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Woodski

Great looking boat, looks immaculate in the pics and great color combo. 

FYI - time to invest in barefooting, that boat is a great barefoot boat...

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tvano

beautiful tugboat, welcome to the crew

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UWSkier

Can't beat the lines of a Response or Sunsetter LXi from that era.  Great-looking boat!  Welcome to the crew.

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96Response

Congrats, Great Looking Boat. I have a 1996 Response. I love it. My wife doesn't even bug me (MUCH) to take out the Pontoon. 

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Lptexastornado1

I have a friend who has a bare foot boom that was for his 2001 Sunsetter LXI that he is trying to sell. (He sold his Sunsetter and got a 24 MXZ) Let me know if your interested and I can get you pictures etc.

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braindamage
7 hours ago, Lptexastornado1 said:

I have a friend who has a bare foot boom that was for his 2001 Sunsetter LXI that he is trying to sell. (He sold his Sunsetter and got a 24 MXZ) Let me know if your interested and I can get you pictures etc.

@Lptexastornado1 I’m interested. PM sent.

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SayReponse

Thanks for the offer on the boom, but the boat came with one, along with a wakeboard pylon extension.   I'm going to try the boom this weekend with my kids and get them up on skis for the first time.   After 15 years away from skiing, I am ready to get back into it.

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sic0048

I'd try teaching them without the boom first (or use a short line on the boom).  Having new skiers grab directly on the boom doesn't help them at all when it come to getting up normally. In fact, I think it actually hurts the process because unless the boom is adjusted to the perfect height, it is actually harder to get into the proper form while grabbing the boom.  The boom also allows a skier to have terrible form and weight distribution and get away with it.  For example, when a skier on a long line bends their arms they will fall backwards, but when they bend their arms while on the boom their skis shoot way too far forward and they end up almost laying back on their ski.  This is a position that is impossible to do on a rope, but is easy to do while grabbing the boom.  Once they are in these awkward positions (and they get into them really quickly), they usually cannot correct it because they don't have the strength or mastery of their body movements.

When it comes to teaching new skiers, we use to boom as a last resort.  Really it is used when a new person fails and can't get up on a long line and we just want them to have some sort of success.  But it's not a stepping stone to help a person learn how to ski unfortunately.

Edited by sic0048

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JeffK

Great looking boat!  Where did you get it?  It looks familiar.  Where do you boat?   I'm just outside of Louisville

Edited by JeffK

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SayReponse

SIC0048 - thanks for the tips on teaching my kids.  I'll definitely use your method with them and avoid the boom.  Any other tips you can throw my way would be greatly appreciated.

JeffK - I bought the boat late last fall in Columbus Ohio.   I live in Oldham County, KY.  I've had it out on Taylorsville Lake a couple of times, but mostly frequent Patoka Lake in southern Indiana.  I'll probably also hit Lake Cumberland a few times this summer.

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JeffK

Awesome!  Let me know if you ever need some help.  I am in Shelby Co.

I grew up in Ohio and lived in Columbus for about 11 years.  You'll have to IM m the previous owner's name if you have it.  I may know him.  That boats looks very familiar.  If it is the same one I am thinking of, it was definitely well cared for.

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happyfeet

I would reconsider the boom advice.

No offense Jeff!  Edit: apologies Jeff, meant Sic.

Especially for younger kids... Experiencing success right from the start will build their confidence more and out way any possible bad habit they could get from the boom.  Your form doesn't need to be as precise as a long line, but that is what helps to get the basics down (which is kind of the point of boom in the first place).  The feeling of standing on skis and having your hips and arms in the right places is very teachable on a boom.  The example Jeff gave of the arms bending and skis going in an undesirable direction is a perfect example of being able to help teach proper form without falling!  It is an incremental step that will lead to a better experience with less falling. 

My 02. 

Edited by happyfeet

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sic0048
1 hour ago, SayReponse said:

SIC0048 - thanks for the tips on teaching my kids.  I'll definitely use your method with them and avoid the boom.  Any other tips you can throw my way would be greatly appreciated.

JeffK - I bought the boat late last fall in Columbus Ohio.   I live in Oldham County, KY.  I've had it out on Taylorsville Lake a couple of times, but mostly frequent Patoka Lake in southern Indiana.  I'll probably also hit Lake Cumberland a few times this summer.

I always start new skiers in the boat (without skis on) and sitting on the floor.  The should be sitting on their butt with their feet flat on the floor, knees in close to their body, and their arms around the outside of their knees (this will help keep the skis together when initially getting pulled out of the water) and arms straight out in front of them holding on to the ski handle.  (This is similar to someone sitting "Indian Style" except their knees are together and pointed up instead of out to the sides).  This is the starting position they need to be in, in the water after the rope gets tight and they are ready to start (see the note below).  I will then pull on the rope to mimic the pull of the boat.  Have them slowly stand up until they are fully upright and standing normally over their feet.  Make sure they have their knees slightly bent and keep their arms straight.  This is the position they should end up in and the process of standing while I pull the rope isn't 100% exactly like being in the water, it isn't a bad 1st step either.  Practice this several times if needed.  (The main issue I see here is people trying to stand up too quickly - like they are jumping out of their seat.  I tell kids they should move like an old person).

The biggest thing to continually stress is that they need to keep their arms straight.  Most people will naturally pull the rope into their body (by bending their arms) if they feel uneasy.  Doing this will guarantee that they will fall backwards onto their back.  It isn't a hard fall, but it is 100% avoidable if they just keep their arms straight.

The other thing I stress is to relax in the water - especially while the boat is getting into position.  Until the rope is tight, it is very difficult to "sit" in the starting position because you tend to tip over from side to side.  Don't let a skier even try to sit in that starting position until the rope is tight.   They will waste a lot of energy trying to keep in that position when all they need to do is relax and float there until the rope is tight.  Once the rope is tight, then they can pull against it and hold that sitting position very easily.  The driver might have to bump the boat into gear every once in a while to keep the rope tight, but don't leave the boat in gear.

There are several things to watch for as the skier starts.....

- Are they simply crumpling forward at the first pull of the boat - getting pulled forward and out of their binding?  If so, they need to use their legs more to press against the pulling action of the boat.

- Are they standing up too quickly causing the skis to bury and then they get pulled forward out of the bindings?  If so they just need to slow down before trying to stand up after the boat starts pulling (count to 3, etc before standing)

- Are they leaning so far back and fighting against the boat that they never seem to get up and let go because they can't hold the handle?  If so, tell them to stay in their initial seated position longer (count to 3, etc before standing)

- Are their skis splitting apart?  Hopefully you have skis that can be tied/linked together.  If not, make sure they have their arms around their knees to start and have them think about keeping their knees together.

- Are they getting out of the water but falling to one side?  They need to use equal force on both feet.  (Although falling to one side can also be caused by the skis splitting apart too).

- Are they getting out of the water, but then falling backwards?  They are bending their arms and pulling the rope into their body.  Remind them to keep their arms straight. This is the hardest thing for people to remember.  I guess it is so natural to bend your arms and pull the rope in.  I've threatened to make a cardboard splint before for some people to force them to keep their arms straight.

Those are probably the most common issues I see and how to correct them. 

Good luck and make sure it is fun for everyone! 

Edited by sic0048

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