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jshap

Rudder issue Cont'd

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jshap

I figured it would be easier to start a new thread than continue Stewart's old one...

I've been messing with my trim tab over the last week and can't seem to find a happy place for it. The tab is working as intended and is not loose, but my question is this:

Regardless of how the rudder is trimmed (neutral, left pull, or right pull), when you let go of the wheel should the boat ever dive 90 deg in either direction at cruising speed (30mph+) ?

What basically happens is this....I let go of the wheel, the wheel starts to slowly turn in whatever direction it's trimmed, then when it gets to a certain point, it does a HARD over until the rudder is all the way turned. At that point, you either grab the wheel, decelerate or see just how fast you can turn. I realize that as the water pressure increases, so does the tension on the rudder, but this can be pretty scary at speed. When a rudder is trimmed neutral (right pull), does the steering wheel move to the right on everyone's boat or does it stay put and the boat just drifts to the right?

My dealer has contacted Malibu and they just keep telling him to trim the tab further to starboard. When I do this, it just does it's little diving act in the other direction. There is a small amount of play in the rudder when you move it by hand, but nothing dramatic. I'm a little perplexed by this. :unsure: Anyone have a thought?

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SacRiverRat

This is normal - a function of the prop rotation pressing on the rudder I believe.

I think the trim tab is intended to reduce the "pull" on the wheel while tracking in a straight line... but not to hold the boat straight if you get up to go get yourself a beer while cruisng along No.gif

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jshap

I don't mind a consistent pull on the wheel, but the dive is very alarming. Seems like there should be a little more tightness in the wheel to prevent the "hard over" effect at a certain point.

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SacRiverRat

I think the intent is that your hands on the wheel prevent the hard over... ;)

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MoonDawg
I figured it would be easier to start a new thread than continue Stewart's old one...

.....Regardless of how the rudder is trimmed (neutral, left pull, or right pull), when you let go of the wheel should the boat ever dive 90 deg in either direction at cruising speed (30mph+) ?

Man that sounds really dangerous...I am glad I have a Direct Drive Biggrin.gif

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88Skier

My Sporty's rudder is not adjustable. Let go of the wheel at any speed above 30 and there is a very short amount of time before the boat goes OC. That's the price you've got to pay for great tracking and steering. Takes a little time to get used to but, it's worth it. If you need both hands, hold the wheel with your leg.

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jshap

Ok...good to know it's not a screwed up rudder. Thanks for the input guys.

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Big Dubya

I'll bet you'll find that if you've got the rudder tab trimmed to "neutral" at one speed, that it won't be neutrally balanced at a faster (or slower) speed. It is always going to require a hand on the wheel, but it is designed to reduce the amount of pull on your hand while underway.

plus, these rudders do not rotate around a point at the front of the fin. The axis of the rudder is part-way back, meaning that the leading edge of the rudder will catch water and "assist" in turning the rudder. That could explain why once it starts to go, it really dives to the hard-stops of the steering limits

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