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exlonghorn

Trailer guide post pads...why are they all garbage?

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exlonghorn

Getting ready to replace my third set of post pads on my trailer. Seems like they are shredded and start to look like hell within a few weeks. Silly to have to replace them every other season. Anyone found a better way to address the need for impact/scrape protection for these posts? Seems like the industry can make a pretty indestructible boat bumper/fender, but can't make post pads that last.

I would think something like this fender with a large post hole through the middle would work brilliantly :)

https://www.polyformus.com/boat-fenders/htm-series

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oldjeep

What is shredding them? Mine are 2 years old and look like new.

Originals that were on it when I got the boat were all faded out from sitting in outside storage since the boat was mostly stored on a lift and trailer was left outside.

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Bill_AirJunky

Good idea. Never have seen anything like that before.

I've had the same issue. They tend to last a little longer but only because I keep the boat on the lake for several months in the summer. Eventually I had an upholstery shop make some covers for me. Along with a Tower mirror cover, add the D-ring to my cover & few other things to make life easier on the boat. I paid $100 for all of it. They're a couple years old now, no fading or tearing at all.

20130217_104946_zpshrvjvrat.jpg

Edited by Bill_AirJunky

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exlonghorn

The most likely culprit is the screws used to affix the chrome rub rail encircling the boat (along with the occasional extended cleat). Just chews them up. I noticed some heavier duty 600-denier canvas covers out there now, so I'll try that this summer. Doesn't really solve the underlying issue with the foam itself. Most models use foam that is very similar to the type of polyethylene used in home plumbing insulation. It's just not designed for the kind of use dished out during trailering...crushes and isn't very resilient to repeated impacts.

I actually took a swing by talking to Polyform about making a prototype post cover made like a HTM fender/bumper as I described. Not interested I guess. Didn't want to make the mold for it apparently.

I load onto the trailer about 30 times a summer.

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oldjeep

Are your pads on pvc sleeves that allow them to float and spin, or are they pretty well fixed on the ateel uprights?

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exlonghorn

oldjeep, I am fairly certain they spin because the rub rail put gouges in the post pipe all around its circumference (after crushing and chewing through the polyethylene foam and nylon cover)

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Bill_AirJunky

Mine are on steel square posts. The pipe insulation failed long ago & was replaced with roll cage padding, which has not broken down yet.

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oldjeep

oldjeep, I am fairly certain they spin because the rub rail put gouges in the post pipe all around its circumference (after crushing and chewing through the polyethylene foam and nylon cover)

If your rub rail is gouging steel then the first step might be replacing your screws.

Also having the pvc inside the guide foam is standard on boatmates, might look at adding that so that the pads are free to float up and down and spin easily.

Bills idea of cage padding is a good one, definitely tougher than pipe insulation and fairly cheap.

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exlonghorn

oldjeep, sorry I wasn't clear. The post is black PVC. The plastic makes a nice mark on the rub rails that takes a fair bit of scrubbing to get off. Another reason I'd like to get this whole pad thing resolved.

Bill_AirJunky, that's a clever idea to use roll cage padding!!

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Bill_AirJunky

Bill_AirJunky, that's a clever idea to use roll cage padding!!

Thanks. You can get it at sites like Jegs or Summit for pretty cheap. I have a padded board rack on the roof of the golf cart. The pipe insulation was the first thing I tried for padding but it broke down in less than one summer. So in the process of working that out, I figured out it was good for padding the guides too. Both applications are a couple years old now.

Edited by Bill_AirJunky

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onamission

How hard are you guys hitting the guild poles with your boats to cause that kind d of wear. Same ones on the boat for 10 years and look new.

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Wakesetter67

These are the best I have found so far, They are made out of a heavier material, But yes if you play pin ball while loading your boat you still might cut them, but it takes a pretty good hit to do it, I have a friend I let load on occasion and he rips them every time, Needless to say I don't let him load anymore..LOL http://www.bakesonline.com/detail.aspx?ID=827

Edited by Wakesetter67

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Bill_AirJunky

How hard are you guys hitting the guild poles with your boats to cause that kind d of wear. Same ones on the boat for 10 years and look new.

You use the PerfectPass to come into the trailer at the right speed, right? :Doh:

In my case I think it's the sun & heat that dry them out & get faded. The Sunbrella version doesn't have any problems like that.

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oldjeep

Mine really only sit in the sun when it is empty at the boat launch. Also pretty rare that my wife does anything but tap them when she loads the boat. Tend to put the trailer in as shallow as possible so it hits the bunks pretty early in the loading process.

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exlonghorn

Yeah we have a fairly steep launch ramp so that plays into it. My wife also takes a pretty good running start at it every time because we actually boat on a river (Lake Austin) with a bit of a current at times. She compensates through speed and brute force. Gotta say that she lands it on the first attempt most of the time, but the guide posts take a bit of a beating in the process.

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dalt1

How hard are you guys hitting the guild poles with your boats to cause that kind d of wear. Same ones on the boat for 10 years and look new.

Do you have the stainless screwed in rub rail? Probably not.

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Pnwrider

I have these Ronix pads from Bakes and they held up great last season. Still look brand new. I towed my boat every weekend so they get used a lot.

http://www.bakesonline.com/detail.aspx?ID=3112

Mine started falling apart and fading the second year.

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PeteOOXXOO

I just remove my pole pads/covers each time I launch - that way it is just the pvc plastic spinner poles that get scratched up and nobody can steal them. After I put her back on the trailer I then slide the pole covers back on and drive home (hides the scratches)... They do fade in the sun though, so I also remove them when I get back home (boat has a full cover but is outside unfortunately)

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onamission

Do you have the stainless screwed in rub rail? Probably not.

2005's came with SS rub rail. I just know how to load a boat on a trailer without it bouncing around and hitting the guild poles like a pin ball. Coast in slow and crank it the rest of t he way.

Edited by onamission

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MadMan

I just remove my pole pads/covers each time I launch - that way it is just the pvc plastic spinner poles that get scratched up and nobody can steal them. After I put her back on the trailer I then slide the pole covers back on and drive home (hides the scratches)... They do fade in the sun though, so I also remove them when I get back home (boat has a full cover but is outside unfortunately)

This sounds backwards to me, I want the padding on my poles when I launch to protect my boat.

My pad damage is always lopsided. The left one gets beat up, while the right one looks new. The launch I use has a pretty good current going.

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gorilla

I had new guide posts built for my Extreme trailer and I literally have 2" on each side when I put the boat on the trailer. They built them that narrow, but I'm not complaining. Really keeps the boat centered and loads quickly. But, I'm running flat pads, not circular ones like everyone on here is talking about. So mine are covered with bunk carpet and are gonna get chewed up pretty quick because of the couple of stainless screws that stick out of my rub rails. Wear item for me, not a big deal. Maybe the bunk carpet ones from Banks would be the best option for those with circular posts.

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Bill_AirJunky

2005's came with SS rub rail. I just know how to load a boat on a trailer without it bouncing around and hitting the guild poles like a pin ball. Coast in slow and crank it the rest of t he way.

If you coast in slow on the river, your going to be sideways on your trailer in a heartbeat. Even on a busy day on the lake there are too many weird currents & eddies around the launch to coast in slow.

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