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New skis recommendation


bandStrider

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Hello,

I sold my double high back slalom ski many years ago when i got rid of my boat.We just bought a DD Malibu (Yeah!) and no ski(s). Unfortunately, I can't convince the wife that I need to have a new slalom ski since she rightly points out that we need a combo set so the kids and she can ski too. Eventually I'll get a slalom ski again, but right now the extra cost is making her balk at buying that and all the other stuff we need so I was wondering if anyone out there had experience with the newer combo sets, and if there is one out there that is still decent for slalom skiing. I know I won't be able to make the cuts like on a full-out slalom ski, but I'd guess that there are ones that are better than others.

Thanks!

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strider....try ski-it-again.com your wife will be amazed at the fantastic used skis for sale that wil be WAY better than a combo. I have some I'd sell...PM me....as for combos...haven't looked at for a while, but they're all likley very very similar.

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A set of combos is about $100 at sports authority, fleet farm or anywhere else they sell basic equipment, then get a used slalom

This is about the only semi performance combo set I remember seeing

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?pdesc=OBrien-Performer-Combo-Waterskis-With-X-8-Bindings&i=763252

http://www.waterskis.com/HO-Burner-Pro-67-Inch-Combo-Waterskis-Closeout-p/ho_burner_67_combos_2013.htm

Ski it again is a good choice, or even craigslist.

Out of curiosity, what size ski do you need?

Edited by oldjeep
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what are the ages and weights of your children?

What is your age and weight and physical ability

As for you, do not waste your time on a set of combos if you are used to being on a dedicated slalom ski for yourself.....PM me...I can help you with your situation

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You will need a set of combo's to get everybody started, you will soon realize, or they will, that it is a very quick graduation up to a single ski which as you know is much more enjoyable. There are so many options today from entry level, wide and then a range of mid to tournament level performance slalom ski's. Do a fair amount of research and contact the crew members that offered above as they are very knowledgeable as you will find out from their posts over time. The ski rope and handle are items to think about also, particularly with DD as you will want to shorten the line so get a line that allows that.

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Thanks for all the replies. I'll have to look into the ski-it-again website and see what's out there. Craigslist around here doesn't seem to have much as I was watching it at the end of last season when we bought the boat. I do already have a sectioned rope, and already figured out the best slalom length for our boat, it definitely makes a difference where you cross the wake. My wife and kids know how to ski (nice to have friends with boats), and my wife will slalom, but not aggressively. I was thinking of some kind of higher end combos for her and guests to use and I was thinking that I wouldn't buy a slalom ski until I had time to research it and convince the wife that I needed one. As for me, at this point I'm 42 and out of skiing shape, but did learn from a competitive skier and like to ski like I'm in a course even though I don't actually venture into it.

JB-Foot, your inbox must be full because it won't accept any more PM's

Thanks for the input.

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Thanks for all the replies. I'll have to look into the ski-it-again website and see what's out there. Craigslist around here doesn't seem to have much as I was watching it at the end of last season when we bought the boat. I do already have a sectioned rope, and already figured out the best slalom length for our boat, it definitely makes a difference where you cross the wake. My wife and kids know how to ski (nice to have friends with boats), and my wife will slalom, but not aggressively. I was thinking of some kind of higher end combos for her and guests to use and I was thinking that I wouldn't buy a slalom ski until I had time to research it and convince the wife that I needed one. As for me, at this point I'm 42 and out of skiing shape, but did learn from a competitive skier and like to ski like I'm in a course even though I don't actually venture into it.

JB-Foot, your inbox must be full because it won't accept any more PM's

Thanks for the input.

Not sure what side of WI you are on, but for just some basic combos on CL near Minneapolis

$50

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ank/boa/4399680997.html

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I have a nice shape Connelly Team 2 67" slalom ski I would be willing to sell dirt cheap to help out a crew member. If interested I would have to get some pics as this has been sitting in the case for a few years. Not the newest technology but would be 100x better than a combo set and this way you could get both.

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I agree with all the above--save your money on the combos and buy a used slalom (or two). Maybe if she gets her own ski she'll be happier than she thought.

BTW, our old wooden Cut 'N Jump combos are always a crowd favorite when learning to ski ($25 yard sale). We've got some EP combos that rarely get used because the woodies are so much more fun.

I'll ask too, where in WI? I can keep an eye out and have family and friends from Milwaukee to Wausau to Tomahawk, Minocqua and more.

Matter of fact here's our EPs in a different color for $50 http://wausau.craigslist.org/spo/4387667755.html

Edited by jk13
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Hello,

I sold my double high back slalom ski many years ago when i got rid of my boat.We just bought a DD Malibu (Yeah!) and no ski(s). Unfortunately, I can't convince the wife that I need to have a new slalom ski since she rightly points out that we need a combo set so the kids and she can ski too. Eventually I'll get a slalom ski again, but right now the extra cost is making her balk at buying that and all the other stuff we need so I was wondering if anyone out there had experience with the newer combo sets, and if there is one out there that is still decent for slalom skiing. I know I won't be able to make the cuts like on a full-out slalom ski, but I'd guess that there are ones that are better than others.

Thanks

You pay for shipping and handling.... I will send you a combo set and a slalom ski..... these are not high end skis, and I would not attempt a course with this slalom ski.... but they are basically free if you want them... pm me if interested

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hmm....got to clean up my inbox.....guess there is a 1st time for everything....LOL

OK.,. ,made some space

Edited by JB-FOOT
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I'm in a similar situation. Need some combo skis for friends to use and learn on (will pick up some new cheap ones) but I am considering to attempt slalom again. It's been probably 18 years since I have been on one. Question is should I try my old one I still have or find a used cheap one? Mine is an 88 or 89 HO Extreme. White with pink squares. Gotta love the 80's! I am thinking it would be better to find a newer cheap used one? I am not sure I can even get in the double boots still. I remember struggling with it in my 20's so I can only imagine now in my 40's. Any suggestions for a used one? What length should I look for? I just turned 46, I'm 5'9" 210lbs. WOW now that I said 46 out loud I am thinking I should just stay in the boat. :cry:

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At your weight, you want to look for a wide tail ski at 69" so you can get up easier and stay up at slower speeds....you might look.find an older HO Comp Charger....

Or an HO Magnum 70" if you want to ski even slower, say 30-32mph

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HO-CHARGER-COMP-FREESTYLE-SERIES-WATER-SKI-69-BLACK-NEW-/300902392921

.

At what weight would that change? I ask because i have been losing weight and hope to be 190 sometime this summer. Last fall I was 240 but working to drop it.

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At what weight would that change? I ask because i have been losing weight and hope to be 190 sometime this summer. Last fall I was 240 but working to drop it.

What size is your HO? I am in your exact physical situation (5'9" and coming from 225 down to 190) and have an old Kidder Pro Tour Graphite, but it's only a 65". Way too small for me now. I skied my brother's 67" Connelly and it felt plenty big. I'll be looking for a mid-wide 67" like the Radar Theory or P6 or similar this summer. Not a fan of the shaped skis or wide bodies that I've tried in the past.

69" is a BIG ski.

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I'm 6ft - 180 and ski on a 67 most of the time I've also got a 69 that I've always used behind under powered boats. Even at 190 the 69 should be fine unless you are planning on running the course. Little extra ski helps smooth out the bumps when you are just free skiing.

If you want a P6, go to wakehouse.com - just bought one for my 17 year old. $139 gets you a 2012 blank blem.

http://www.wakehouse.com/products/radar-p-6-slalom-water-ski-blem.html

P6 is a bit wider than my senate, but still supposed to perform well. You can see the difference in this pic, both are 2012 model 67's (got both of them from wakehouse)

post-22501-0-38044100-1397135009_thumb.j

Edited by oldjeep
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that depends on how fast you want to ski at....the faster you ski the smaller ski you can ride....190 you could ski a 69. 210 you need a 70+, unless you are skiing over 32+ mph...I have found as a basic rule

I weigh 198, am 6' 2" tall, ski at 34-35 mph and use a 69" ski...it works for me, and I am 59 years old. and dont ski nearly as aggresive as I did 10 years ago....but this is the type of skiing I do with my set-up

the tail of the ski has a lot to do with ease of getting up, as the wider the tail the easier I find it to get up and on plane so to speak....

Also, factors like your back condition, and your weight to strength ratio, will determine what size and shape ski to buy...full concave, semi concave, Double High Wraps, Single High Wrap, etc.....

Plus, I am assuming we are not talking slalom course skiing and we are talking recreational open water skiing where we are wanting to ski longer than 17-23 seconds at a time...

Here are a few of MANY basic ski size charts you can find:

http://www.activewake.com/water-ski-buyers-guide/

http://waterski.about.com/od/tipsslalombegin/a/slalom_sizing.htm

http://www.proskicoach.com/waterski-instruction/slalom-water-ski-size

Edited by JB-FOOT
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JB always has great advice and I'm not arguing here at all, just showing that a lot of personal preference goes into this as well.

67" fits into 195-200 at the top range of those charts. And if you click on his last link the paragraph right before the chart says:

"There are always exceptions to the rule that need to be taken into account. For example, if you are 5'5" (165cm) tall and weight 200lbs (91kg), you should look for a 67" ski."

--Now, we are not 5'5", but most guys that are 6'2" wear roughly a size 12 compared to my size 9.5. That means JB's front toes and rear heel are likely to be at least an inch closer each to the ends of the ski. That makes a difference in control.

--From playing hockey and soccer as a kid I carry most of my weight in my legs. My calves are over 16" around so when I turn on my off side it always feels like the water spray will push my back foot out the rear of the RTP. Something I've actually had happen in younger days (forehead meet ski tip). I will be trying starts with my brother's new double boot ski, so that should help. A wider ski will also help.

--I still ski aggressively. Turn sharp, body as close to the water as I can, hard on edge to/through the wake, lots of speed, etc. For me it's a daily replacement for going to the gym as much as a rec. activity. More fun than the gym, but a good workout too. I ski about a mile out and a mile back, dozen or so cuts each direction if I can.

--If we were chasing buoys I have the disadvantage of much shorter hand-to-ski reach. Basically like a 6'2"er on a shorter rope.

For those reasons and after riding other skis I will be buying a 67" mid wide. I always put a lot of thought and research into decisions I make about stuff like this, even though I may not lay it all out in an initial answer. Heck I bought my Kidder just after high school and haven't pulled the trigger on a replacement yet. :lol:

Edited by jk13
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What size is your HO? I am in your exact physical situation (5'9" and coming from 225 down to 190) and have an old Kidder Pro Tour Graphite, but it's only a 65". Way too small for me now. I skied my brother's 67" Connelly and it felt plenty big. I'll be looking for a mid-wide 67" like the Radar Theory or P6 or similar this summer. Not a fan of the shaped skis or wide bodies that I've tried in the past.

69" is a BIG ski.

I think my old HO is a 68 but not positive. I was much lighter back then but i was also skiing behind a very under powered boat. I rented several different skis and different sizes before deciding on that one. i may do the same thing this time and rent a couple before deciding. I may decide I am too old for this and just spend my time trying to learn to surf.

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I think my old HO is a 68 but not positive. I was much lighter back then but i was also skiing behind a very under powered boat. I rented several different skis and different sizes before deciding on that one. i may do the same thing this time and rent a couple before deciding. I may decide I am too old for this and just spend my time trying to learn to surf.

Demo is always best if possible. And if your last experience was on a 68" then 69 or even 70" is certainly within reason.

For me I found it too big of a difference from what I'm used to.

And giving up slalom for surf? :fingerwag: No reason not to do both.

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I'm 5'10", currently 205 ish and ride on a 68" strada. I ski at 34.2 and run the course. My ski and similar ski's work for me until I hit about 220 at its outer limit, then it won't turn and deep water starts become very tricky/laborious. Between 195 and 205 this ski size is perfect for me, I wouldn't go down to a 67 unless I was sub 190 or rode a different type ski like a Goode Nano, which are designed to ski shorter than more traditional skis. I wouldn't consider a 69 or 70 for your size unless you were skiing mostly 30mph or slower. Hope this helps on ski sizing.

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I'm 5'10", currently 205 ish and ride on a 68" strada. I ski at 34.2 and run the course. My ski and similar ski's work for me until I hit about 220 at its outer limit, then it won't turn and deep water starts become very tricky/laborious. Between 195 and 205 this ski size is perfect for me, I wouldn't go down to a 67 unless I was sub 190 or rode a different type ski like a Goode Nano, which are designed to ski shorter than more traditional skis. I wouldn't consider a 69 or 70 for your size unless you were skiing mostly 30mph or slower. Hope this helps on ski sizing.

I think i will start by renting a 69 and figuring out just where I am at as far as speed I am comfortable with and just how easily I can still get up and then go from there. It's been a long time. I have no desire to get on a course again, just some playing around and showing my boys I wasn't lying when I told them I use to ski alot.

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JB always has great advice and I'm not arguing here at all, just showing that a lot of personal preference goes into this as well.

67" fits into 195-200 at the top range of those charts. And if you click on his last link the paragraph right before the chart says:

"There are always exceptions to the rule that need to be taken into account. For example, if you are 5'5" (165cm) tall and weight 200lbs (91kg), you should look for a 67" ski."

--Now, we are not 5'5", but most guys that are 6'2" wear roughly a size 12 compared to my size 9.5. That means JB's front toes and rear heel are likely to be at least an inch closer each to the ends of the ski. That makes a difference in control.

--From playing hockey and soccer as a kid I carry most of my weight in my legs. My calves are over 16" around so when I turn on my off side it always feels like the water spray will push my back foot out the rear of the RTP. Something I've actually had happen in younger days (forehead meet ski tip). I will be trying starts with my brother's new double boot ski, so that should help. A wider ski will also help.

--I still ski aggressively. Turn sharp, body as close to the water as I can, hard on edge to/through the wake, lots of speed, etc. For me it's a daily replacement for going to the gym as much as a rec. activity. More fun than the gym, but a good workout too. I ski about a mile out and a mile back, dozen or so cuts each direction if I can.

--If we were chasing buoys I have the disadvantage of much shorter hand-to-ski reach. Basically like a 6'2"er on a shorter rope.

For those reasons and after riding other skis I will be buying a 67" mid wide. I always put a lot of thought and research into decisions I make about stuff like this, even though I may not lay it all out in an initial answer. Heck I bought my Kidder just after high school and haven't pulled the trigger on a replacement yet. :lol:

Ha, ha....My size 12's help me in bare footing as well....and my 37" sleeve length helps to get around the buoys.....

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