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Asmodeus2112

Submerged Boat Restoration Potential Project

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Asmodeus2112

I've been looking for a low cost SSLX that I could invest some time in to bring back to life. I think this might be a little too much of a project to restore and keep economical. I'm starting a spreadsheet right now, but would appreciate anyone's experience on how viable repairing a boat like this is, and what else to consider/look for outside of the obvious.

http://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/boa/4134838224.html

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Ndawg12

Gotta appreciate their honesty, don't see that much especially on CL. I say go for it!!

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wakesetter8796

Looks pretty good except the damage lol does it run?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Asmodeus2112

Looks pretty good except the damage lol does it run?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

He says they pickled the engine and it runs. Quite a bit of the risk is there, if the engine doesn't hold up then there would be no hope financially.

Edited by Asmodeus2112

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Falko

It would make a beautiful planter if all else failed.

Really need to repair that area of glass properly. That would be my only concern.

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99response

Not worth it, EFI motor is only going to be a gremlin along with the rest of the electronics.

It's a shame, looks like a well maintained boat.

Edited by 99response

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Asmodeus2112

It would make a beautiful planter if all else failed.

Really need to repair that area of glass properly. That would be my only concern.

Yep. Biggest financial gain is to do that myself, but that's not a small job. Possible to have a shop do the work, will need to get a ballpark estimate.

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martinarcher

If I found that one it would be extremely temping. Chris has a point though....the EFI would need some attention with time.

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wakedncsu

Get this one instead...you'd have to get it for less money though.

http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/rds/boa/4086563427.html

I like this boat as a project boat much more. I think you will still have plenty to keep you busy for the winter, and you will end up with a much more trustworthy, consistent boat.

I had an old boat. I hated that fact that everytime I turned the key I was worried if the boat was going to crank up or not. I feel like the first boat will be the same. You will have to be willing to give a lot of water time to chase gremlins.

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Asmodeus2112

Get this one instead...you'd have to get it for less money though.

http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/rds/boa/4086563427.html

I'd be pretty interested in that if it was a bit closer. I've considered shipping boats, but when the cost is 10-20% of the overall purchase price it doesn't make sense.

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longbeard

I have done some fiberglass work and that may be a booger, you would for sure want it done correctly because of all the forces from the prop wash right there. It looks to be very well maintained otherwise. It would be tempting if you wanted to pay cash for a boat, small chunk at a time as opposed to one big lump sum. I am not sure you would save much money when all said and done tho.

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NCVride

I like this boat as a project boat much more. I think you will still have plenty to keep you busy for the winter, and you will end up with a much more trustworthy, consistent boat.

I had an old boat. I hated that fact that everytime I turned the key I was worried if the boat was going to crank up or not. I feel like the first boat will be the same. You will have to be willing to give a lot of water time to chase gremlins.

Plus next winter you could go for installing Teakgate...... :lol:

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Levi900RR

I think there is some money to be made in my area on project boats like this... There just aren't any used inboards

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Michigan boarder

He says they pickled the engine and it runs. Quite a bit of the risk is there, if the engine doesn't hold up then there would be no hope financially.

What does "pickled" mean?

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Woodski

Very tempting if you are going to DIY it. If outsourcing I would think the labor costs would kill it financially. You would certainly look at it as a labor of love. Looks to be in good condition other than the impact damage (barring the water submersion effects). You would certainly learn a lot on how to do fiberglass repair!

I would think if they didn't completely sink the boat (the upper part doesn't look like it was submerged) and you found out where the upper water line was, you could make a good estimate of how risky the electronics will be.

I would certainly try to determine the last mechanical part that gave in the impact, check the castings for any cracks, particularly the bell-housing as that is probably the weakest casting if the prop was lifted a fair amount. Also all the fiberglass around the engine mounts.

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Asmodeus2112

What does "pickled" mean?

It's the process of restoring an engine after it has been submerged. It's supposed to be done almost immediately after the motor is recovered. Essentially flushing with fresh water and then filling it with lubricant to prevent corrosion. Also involves removing starter, alternator, distributor etc. to dry them properly.

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Asmodeus2112

Worst case I'd have a tandem trailer and some parts. I could buy another boat with a single axle trailer and upgrade!

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wakedncsu

Very tempting if you are going to DIY it. If outsourcing I would think the labor costs would kill it financially. You would certainly look at it as a labor of love. Looks to be in good condition other than the impact damage (barring the water submersion effects). You would certainly learn a lot on how to do fiberglass repair!

I would think if they didn't completely sink the boat (the upper part doesn't look like it was submerged) and you found out where the upper water line was, you could make a good estimate of how risky the electronics will be.

I would certainly try to determine the last mechanical part that gave in the impact, check the castings for any cracks, particularly the bell-housing as that is probably the weakest casting if the prop was lifted a fair amount. Also all the fiberglass around the engine mounts.

that is a good point. if the boat wasn't completely submerged there might not be that much engine maintenance. That is the part the would scare me. Not the whether I could fix it. The do I want to fix it on random Saturdays when friends have been invited on the boat for the next few years because the motor was submerged by the previous owner and I loved me a good project....

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Michigan boarder

Worst case, ditch the ECM and EFI and go carb. It's a '96, so it wouldn't really affect resale value. It otherwise really does look like a nice boat.

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Asmodeus2112

Worst case, ditch the ECM and EFI and go carb. It's a '96, so it wouldn't really affect resale value. It otherwise really does look like a nice boat.

Yeah, and I know this is silly, but my family really likes red. It seems like most of the boats we see in the vintage we can afford are mostly green for some reason.

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WakeGirl

IMO....the person that made him the offer of $2500 was on point, and if it were me I'd have offered less. You can buy a boat like that quite often for the low teens, if you keep your eyes open. (Too many things about it drive the price down from the mid-teens). Ask yourself if you can get all of that fixed for less than $8k, and have the end result be a strong, reliable boat. And if it were me, it would have to be substantially less than that difference to make it worth my time. I've rebuilt a boat before, and I wouldn't consider doing it again if it were going to be a wash financially. I suspect that at best that's what you're looking at.

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Michigan boarder

Yeah, and I know this is silly, but my family really likes red. It seems like most of the boats we see in the vintage we can afford are mostly green for some reason.

Yeah, I've got my own red boat project going on right now!

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Asmodeus2112

IMO....the person that made him the offer of $2500 was on point, and if it were me I'd have offered less. You can buy a boat like that quite often for the low teens, if you keep your eyes open. (Too many things about it drive the price down from the mid-teens). Ask yourself if you can get all of that fixed for less than $8k, and have the end result be a strong, reliable boat. And if it were me, it would have to be substantially less than that difference to make it worth my time. I've rebuilt a boat before, and I wouldn't consider doing it again if it were going to be a wash financially. I suspect that at best that's what you're looking at.

Yes, I agree. There are '97's with monsoon 320's, tower, wedge for 14-16K. I have a spreadsheet and am putting costs together to determine high-low estimates. Ultimately I posted up in the hopes to get some opinions of what to look for, if anyone had repaired fiberglass from a prop strike like this etc. The seller has promised some better pictures of the damaged area, and I have a small list of questions I'm hoping he'll answer.

And I'm a fixer. The comment about this being a labor of love definitely applies to me and SSLX's.

Edited by Asmodeus2112

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WakeGirl

Yeah I get that. When you think you're done with your estimates, add 15%.

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