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New2Texas

What is an hour worth on your boat?

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New2Texas

I am selling my Malibu, but still using it regularly because... well, its an awesome boat!

As I continue to put hours on the boat, should I reduce the sale price? If yes, by how much? I am looking for creative ideas around how much you would lower your sale price per hour?

For example:

If the asking price was $37,900 with 330 hours. What price should it with 360 hours? Is there a per hour dollar amount you would reduce the sale price?

$100/hour?

$50/hour?

$25/hour?

Edited by New2Texas

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Web

To me an hour aint worth much. Matter of fact, to me 50 hrs wouldn't matter on the sales price. What matters most to me is that to boat is in clean condition and appears well maintained. Heck, even 100 hrs might not change sales price.

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Falko

In reality, what's an engine run for time before needing replacement, 1000, 1500, 2000 hours? What's a new long block cost? $8k installed? So, $4-8 per hour plus whatever wear items cost as well. Overall though, it depends on the buyer. Some might over look a 250 hour difference for an option or two or possibly a more desired color or locale.

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Bill_AirJunky

1 hr isn't going to make a big difference. Even 30 hrs isn't more than $100 or so. But like Falko said, 100s or 1000s of hours makes a difference. And likewise, too few hours means the boat hasn't been used or cared for.... could mean problems with dry rot, mold or mildew, dried out rubber in the engine, etc.

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shawndoggy

It's worth the added maintenance burden and wear and tear.

Receipts for brand new serpentine belt, cap, rotor, plug wires, plugs, fuel filter(s) and impeller, plus a fresh oil change and tranny fluid change (whether it needs 'em or not) would make me feel very confident as a buyer, regardless of the hours.

And all that stuff shouldn't add up to more than $500 tops.

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WakingMeHappy

I wouldn't lower the price at all. As you add hours just say so to prospective buyers.

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augie09

My boat was 20 or 30 more than advertised. Didn't think twice on changing price. Now if it was 100 or more, maybe would of brought it up.

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Ndawg12

$1000/hr, give me a call in about 40 hrs :biggrin:

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New2Texas

Good to hear. Thanks guys.

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teamerickson

An hour on my boat is priceless! :tease1:

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Cdoogles

Some folks are funny about hours. Last year when I was selling my 2012 with 185 hours I have several people say they weren't interested because they considered that "high" hours. 185 hours with records of all oil changes and maintenance on a flawless boat (no scratches, non-functional equipment, etc.) seems like absolutely nothing to me.

Two years ago when I sold my 2007 with 280 hours on it, people were so excited about the "low hours." Yet on that one, it sat un-winterized and un-maintained for the first two years of it's life and then I racked up 250 more hours on it in two seasons. Given it was also in great shape by the time I got done with it, but it just goes to show that hours aren't the best reflection of a boat's condition.

I would love to see how far one of these boats would go if you were running it 2000 hours a season. I bet you would make it at least 4-5 years before you had any major overhaul work needed on the engine and transmission components.

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pkh

To add to above - I think more value is lost not using boats than using them. If you figure every year that goes by that the boat doesn't get used, its still losing value.

Our 2012 had 285 hours when we traded it in, I was very happy with how much value we got out of it and the trade in price.

On the other hand its amazing to see 10 year old boats with less hours than that. Sad really.

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foiler1

$1000/hr, give me a call in about 40 hrs :biggrin:

LOL i was thinking the same

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JoeA

It's great time to sell your boat so there's no need to lower the price. Keep using the boat and enjoy every hour.

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Ndawg12

Unless the buyer frequents sites like this, and gets educated, then 99% of them will probably cringe at hours no matter what. Unless the hours are ridiculously low in which they'll think is great but usually is a bad thing, use it or lose it.

One thing I've learned from this site and from an Inmar rep, is that these newer (efi) engines have been designed to run around 2k hours before a rebuild may be on the horizon. Take that FWIW.

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nyryan2001

The depriation.... Or $/hr scale is not linear.

The first 100hrs on a new noat are about 30-50$ an hour. That's well established.

Then say a chunk of hours in the 800-900hr range may only be 5-10$ an hr.

There are a bunch of additional variables that influene that.... such as condition of the boat, service records, year and model, and the region in which the boat is sold.

I would estimate in your hour range you are in the 10$ per hour range.

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