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sledandski

Anchor Winch?

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sledandski

I have an older ski boat that I am hoping to replace it with a sunsetter or response soon. Typically I trailer to the lake and my time on the water is split between evening runs were skiing / footing is the primary goal and weekends where we are just basically out having fun (tubing, hanging out, etc). During the "out just to have fun" times it is not uncommon for us to anchor and jump in the water. I typically keep a 30lb river anchor in the boat on these kinds of trips and 150' of rope on a reel. When I am only in 10 feet of water pulling the anchor up is not an issue. However when I am in 50 or 70 feet of water, it is a lot of work to pull that anchor up.

I was thinking of building a water proof winch that could connect to the bow eye and and would sit just in the water. I did a lot of searching but could not find anything online.

I am curious does anyone else have this issue or have they found solutions?? I cannot believe I am the only one who anchors in 50ft of water. Maybe I am the only one that does it with a 30lb anchor :)

Thanks for the input

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Bill_AirJunky

Box anchor...... their 10 or 12 lbs, no chain, less rope, a lot easier to set, and I've personally never had a problem pulling it up.

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CliffB

You don't need a 30lb anchor for a ski boat. Current, windage, and displacement are the primary factors in determining size of anchor. Type of bottom also has some influence but that's more of a factor with the type of anchor.

For a ski boat (very little windage and small displacement) used on a typical river where the current may be up to 3-4 knots max you would be well equipped with a 15lb mushroom type anchor or a 10lb plow type anchor. You would want to add 3-4 feet of chain (preferably stainless) as a leader to that as that helps to set the anchor. That will add about another 5-6 lbs so you're at between 15 and 20lbs in total - quite a bit less than the 30lbs you're currently using.

Nothing wrong with anchoring in 50 feet of water. If you use a chain leader on the anchor you don't need to let out as much line for scope as the leader helps to get the anchor set (and stay) on the bottom.

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sledandski

Thanks all for the input. I was wondering if 30lbs was on the big side. I never really had to worry about it setting and the boat was never near moving. I do not typically anchor on a river, but the info from cliffB was helpful. 2 of the lakes I am typically on have pretty mucky and weedy bottoms. This was the reason I basically used shear weight to hold the boat. Any comments on how well the box anchor or shovel anchor works in that type of bottom??

Thanks again all for the input.

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WakingMeHappy

Anchor winches are great. Just holler at your wife and say, "get the anchor winch" ;)

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shawndoggy

Lol I think that's an anchor wench not an anchor winch.

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sledandski

Cool, looks like the box anchor may be my solution. I will have to start keeping my eyes open for some coupons. Up here in MI we just got a foot of snow and today is the first day this week in the high teens :(

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wakedncsu

Anchor winches are great. Just holler at your wife and say, "get the anchor winch" ;)

If I said this I'm pretty sure I would be the new anchor.

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