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Clogged Oil Drain Hose?


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Hey, I just purchased my 2001 23LSV this year and did the fluid change and winterization last weekend for the first time. (Thanks for all the good info on the site when it comes to winterization folks!) I made my own fake-a-lake and it works great. Got the engine temp up to operating range so the oil would flow more freely but when I fed the drain hose thru the hull opening and pulled the oil cap not much oil came out. Rigged up a suction setup on the hose with a male air nozzle screwed into the drain hose and then tried using a hand pump to break loose any clogged oil in the line. No dice, just collapsed the suction hose. I finally just hand suctioned about 4.5 quarts of oil out of the dipstick opening. My question for you guys is there something stupid/obvious I missed when it comes to getting oil to flow from the drain hose? I couldn't find a valve anywhere on it. Thanks.

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Cap, nothing to miss just a rubber hose. I have seen quick drain fittings for oil pans for cars before so you might feel around under the pan in case someone put one inline with the hose. Before you re-fill with oil, I would unscrew the hose from the brass elbow and the brass elbow from the oil pan to figure out where the stoppage is. Good luck.

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Mine usually takes some time to start the flow out of the hose, so if it never really started to flow, I would say that there is a blockage somewhere in the hose...

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bringing the operating temp up to 160F doesn't equate to having the oil hot enough to speed flow. I believe the 160F is the water temp, not the block. Engine needs to idle awhile longer at that temp to warm the oil.

I changed mine a couple weeks back, and was surprised at how cool the oil was that was coming out of the hose. I'm not the most patient guy. I stick an oil extractor down the dipstick, and also open the (painfully slow) drain hose. It seems as though relying solely on the drain hose would take an hour or so. Next time around, I will let the engine run longer (on the fake a lake).

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Thanks for the feedback folks. I'm definitely going to see if I can get my meathooks underneath the block to verify there is no valve there. I'd have thought that idling it for 15 min would have brought it up to oil-flow temp. I know the oil in the pump when I manually extracted it was pretty dang hot to the touch. I may try to see if I can feed a semi-rigid plastic tube up the oil tube next time to see if I can free up any gunk that might be in there. Just hope there isn't a screen at the end of the hose fitting on the engine side that I'd hit.

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bringing the operating temp up to 160F doesn't equate to having the oil hot enough to speed flow. I believe the 160F is the water temp, not the block. Engine needs to idle awhile longer at that temp to warm the oil.

I changed mine a couple weeks back, and was surprised at how cool the oil was that was coming out of the hose. I'm not the most patient guy. I stick an oil extractor down the dipstick, and also open the (painfully slow) drain hose. It seems as though relying solely on the drain hose would take an hour or so. Next time around, I will let the engine run longer (on the fake a lake).

I would agree with you, I changed the oil on mine the other day, and even after running the engine for almost 20 minutes the oil was surprisingly cool, despite the heat radiating from the engine compartment!
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In my experience, waiting for the oil to drain is a two beer activity. The oil in the hose will not get as warm as the oil in the pan. Once the cool oil drains, the warm oil behind it comes out a bit faster though still slower than an auto drain.

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Oberon, I would normally toss back a couple of your handle namesakes but wanted to do a thorough job my first time out. Gotta love Bell's brews. Drank a whole lotta them when I lived in Flint many moons ago.

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I hear you. The oil drained out particularly slow the first time I changed my oil but has been more steady since then. Its possible that the previous owners of our boats weren't as meticulous as us and went longer between changes allowing crude to clog the hose.

Welcome to the forum This place will have better information than your local mechanic most of the time.

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I hear you. The oil drained out particularly slow the first time I changed my oil but has been more steady since then. Its possible that the previous owners of our boats weren't as meticulous as us and went longer between changes allowing crude to clog the hose.

hose accumulating crud could be from non-use, too.

perhaps the prior owner used an extractor, not the hose?

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It will be very hard to see, but check the hose coming out of the oil pan (at the oil pan) to see if the hose is kinked. I'm guessing that might be your problem.

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OK This issue of slow oil drainage bothered me this past weekend as I winterized. A bit of digging and I've found the issue. The drainage tube connects to the oil pan with a hollow bolt. That bolt has hole near the bolt head. Oil drains through the bolt, and makes the 90 degree turn into the drainage hose. The bolt hole must align with the drainage tube. See the hollow drainage bolt in the picture.

I scored the bolt head in the direction of the thru hole so I could insure that the drainage tube was aligned properly after I tightened the bolt up to the oil pan.

Consider this as you also look for blockages, kinks, etc.

post-14951-0-13475400-1352339121_thumb.j

Edited by ATLWake43
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Just make sure the hose isn't kinked, I had that issue on my 09. I did find when sucking the oil out of my 2012 it did take some time, longer than I hoped it would but it all came out. I think I am going to use an battery powered pump next year!

Edited by old skool malibu
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OK This issue of slow oil drainage bothered me this past weekend as I winterized. A bit of digging and I've found the issue. The drainage tube connects to the oil pan with a hollow bolt. That bolt has hole near the bolt head. Oil drains through the bolt, and makes the 90 degree turn into the drainage hose. The bolt hole must align with the drainage tube. See the hollow drainage bolt in the picture.

I scored the bolt head in the direction of the thru hole so I could insure that the drainage tube was aligned properly after I tightened the bolt up to the oil pan.

It shouldn't. It may make it drain a bit faster, but the system is set up to be put in how ever you like. The washer seals it, and the oil flows around the shoulder of the bolt and finds the hole and drains.Same way that brake lines with these fitting work.

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