Jump to content

Welcome to TheMalibuCrew!

As a guest, you are welcome to poke around and view the majority of the content that we have to offer, but in order to post, search, contact members, and get full use out of the website you will need to Register for an Account. It's free and it's easy, so don't hesitate to join the TheMalibuCrew Family today!

Ballast tank / Lake inspection / denial of entry


Broccoli2

Recommended Posts

So, i know about Quagga zebra Mussels, I have dealt with inspections in the past on previous boat's. Never been a problem just keep everything dry and your good to go..

The inspections have gotten way stricter. They actually get in your boat to make sure all the carpets are dry inside and under all the seat cushions, ski locker, every where. If it is even damp, you fail and can NOT enter.. If you have an I/O they make you raise and lower the motor is any water comes out your done, bye, bye.

I just got my new V-Ride on Saturday and did not test drive it because I knew they wouldn't let me on the lake..

If you go to the same lake it's fine just make sure they tag you boat on the way out and you don't have to do the inspection next time.. They put a wrist band type tag thru the front hook on your boat and then thru your trailer. When you come back they remove it. easy peasy..

But I am going to a different lake for the week of 4th of July. I called they wont let me use the tag from the lake by my house even though it's in same state with in a 4 hour drive...

Finally my question.. How do they know if my Ballasts tanks are empty (stock under floor tanks) and How the heck can I make sure they are dry.. I was thinking of rigging a fan with tubes into the over flow holes.. My wife said she looked it up online and found a solution to make that included acetone.. I said hell no I wasn't putting acetone in the ballasts

What say you?

Link to comment

Nope has to be completely dry.. No exceptions

Can you not just dump some clorox into the tanks before hand?

Link to comment

I would not put acetone in your ballast system or anywhere else except light usage on the gel coat. Ever. Period.

According to this website chlorine is poisonous to the mussels, but won't help you pass a dry boat inspection. However, I don't know how they could inspect hard ballast tanks.

Link to comment

They just started checking at the lakes by my house, but all you have to do is fill out a paper you wern't at any of the lakes or water ways on the list in the last month, no inspections yet!

Link to comment

We went to a "muscle free" lake in Utah last year. It had been a few weeks since we had last been out because I was out of town for work so they just checked to make sure it was dry, but the inspector said there are places you can go and have hot water pumped into your boat and then you get a certificate to show it was done.

Link to comment

At the public lake near me, if you have ballast tanks they make you go through decontamination where they pump some chemical (don't know what) into each tank. They do the normal inspection of the hull, and the bilge, and then the tanks have to be sanitized. No exceptions on the tanks, dry or wet.

Link to comment

@skier007 Nacimiento, Have you been?

I did read about the hot water thing, 140 degrees I think... I would do that but there aren't any anywhere near me.

Link to comment

I just called the lake by my house. when I first whet there the inspector didn't really check it out that much because bought it brand new the day before...

They said... Everything must be dry including life jacket, dock lines, compartments, etc In reference to ballast tanks they just ask you to flip the switch and if no water comes out your good to go... Think they need to be retrained. If you were in a lake with mussels they could live for months in an inch of water and they when it gets filled and then dumped that lake could be contaminated... I don't want to have to go thru these inspections but I do want my lake clean and not destroyed but if I have to wait inline for an hour to get inspected and it's pointless That is stupid...

Oh I call Nacimiento they transferred me to the ranger in charge of inspections.. I left a message they said he will call back. If he does I'll let you know what he says

Oh and neither lake accepts any kind of certificate

Edited by Broccoli2
Link to comment

I asked that and she (one of the inspectors) said "what do you mean" "we check around the motor and as long as the bilge is dry"

See what i'm talking about? In her defense she only knows what they told her and the only thing I can thing is if the water get hot enough it would kill them so they don't even bring it up at the training

Link to comment

I would agree that the exhaust water should be 160 or so, which would be warm enough to kill the pests, but I could see getting an illogical poorly trained inspector that would want the exhaust and/or the block drained.

Link to comment

My thermostat wAs stuck open when I bought my boat. No clue how long it had bees that way. Engine temp was the same as the lake. I could place my hand on the cylinder head.

My point is that all this work they are doing is a waste of time. Unless they are willing to do a full decontamination, like at Powell, it's a waste. Too many douche bag liars. Too many people that just don't know any better and $10 an hour employees that really don't care.

Powell asked you where the boat has been last. Then they make you go to deconatination if you were at a flagged lake. At the decontamination station they run 160-180 degree water through your engine. They check your bilge. And they also pump water into your tanks. They have adapters to clean bags too. They also fill the Purevert systems with the same plunger that works on the ski boats.

In the end it comes down to the people. And too many a** clowns don't care.

  • Like 2
Link to comment

Agreed! I think they should just decontaminate all boats no matter what lake they came from unless it is tagged from a clean lake.. They could do it state by state.. So a tag from any clean lake in CA is good to go on any other clean lake in CA if not you get decontaminated period.. all the different rules at every single lake is stupid.. Oh and dealers and service shops or even stand alone shops should start doing this for a small fee. Heck it would bring you into there shop to buy something while you wait.. If you know you went to a contaminated lake just hit the shop on the way home and your ready for you next trip...

I used to love Lake Mead outside Vegas.. Boat all day the back to the strip for night life.. It doesn't get better.. I haven't been since the out break

Last year I left Havasu and when we hit the agricultural check point in CA they did a quick inspection (havasu is an infected lake) It was over 100 degrees out and they found no water. THey didn't check my ski locker and my anchor lines.. when I got home they were both still wet.

By no means do i want to wait in hour lines to get on the lake but I think if they did it as stated it would speed up the process

My thermostat wAs stuck open when I bought my boat. No clue how long it had bees that way. Engine temp was the same as the lake. I could place my hand on the cylinder head. My point is that all this work they are doing is a waste of time. Unless they are willing to do a full decontamination, like at Powell, it's a waste. Too many douche bag liars. Too many people that just don't know any better and $10 an hour employees that really don't care. Powell asked you where the boat has been last. Then they make you go to deconatination if you were at a flagged lake. At the decontamination station they run 160-180 degree water through your engine. They check your bilge. And they also pump water into your tanks. They have adapters to clean bags too. They also fill the Purevert systems with the same plunger that works on the ski boats. In the end it comes down to the people. And too many a** clowns don't care.
Link to comment

@broc, we have a place in Parker, and every time I have gone through, they ask for anchors and lines. I've seen the inspectors go into boats when people said they did not have an anchor. I just leave my anchor and lines in the bed of the truck, and spray with bleach before I get on the road. I leave everything accessible and the bleach at the rear of my bed, inspectors look for about 30 secs and wave me through. I was flagged last year when they found a mussel on my anchor. Thank god I wasn't using the boat for two weeks anyway.

Link to comment

I agree that this all sounds like a hassle, but every time I jump in my lake and cut up my (fill in body part) I wish they had done more to stop the invasive buggers here in Michigan.

To the OP. You could always just carry 2 small fat sacks with you. When they ask if you have ballast, say yes and show them the empty, dry bags. That might work and save you some trouble. Please only do this though if you know that your boat is not infested!

Link to comment

Manditory decontamination for every boat is the only way to slow this down. Eventually, they will spread. As for drying everything out. I thought these buggers could live for 30 days or something dry (like the larva or something like that). So dry rope, carpet etc, is sort of a non-starter if you really have been in infected waters in the last few weeks.

Link to comment

What lake were you on.. Was it easy to see?

I was flagged last year when they found a mussel on my anchor.

How do you get cut up by them? are they just floating in the water?

Do you have any problems with them going in your ballasts or anywhere on your Bu?

I agree that this all sounds like a hassle, but every time I jump in my lake and cut up my (fill in body part) I wish they had done more to stop the invasive buggers here in Michigan.

Link to comment

All I read was 7 days dry.. I could be wrong I hope it's not 30

Manditory decontamination for every boat is the only way to slow this down. Eventually, they will spread. As for drying everything out. I thought these buggers could live for 30 days or something dry (like the larva or something like that). So dry rope, carpet etc, is sort of a non-starter if you really have been in infected waters in the last few weeks.

Link to comment

How do you get cut up by them? are they just floating in the water?

They grow along the bottom of lakes and are sharp as h e double hockey sticks.

Link to comment

All I read was 7 days dry.. I could be wrong I hope it's not 30

My memory is dicey at best!

This is interesting:

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=quagga+mussels&view=detail&id=B76F767E8AC652C7D5CA260BC36D8C42D7570229&first=351

Broccoli2 - They coat everything, clog up, jam up, etc.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=quagga+mussels&qs=IM&form=QBIR&pq=quagga&sc=8-6&sp=2&sk=IM1

Link to comment

Are the AG checkpoint people supposed to give a meaningful check?

With huge contaminated lakes like mead and havasu how can they possibly stop and really check every boat?

And with today's budget constraints can every state have a ranger at every ramp 24/7 inspecting?

I'm pessimistic about the current controls being meaningful enough.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...