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New Boat Break-in


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Getting ready to take delivery of my 2012 23 lsv wakesetter this Thursday, any suggestions on the proper break-in? Dealer says to take it easy for the first 10 hours or so, book says to change oil after the first 10 hours and the tranny oil between 10-20 hours. Does it really need a full oil and fluid service after the first 10 hours? Also, suggestions on how low to keep the rpm's during the first 10 hours?? Or is all of this just over-kill?

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Take it easy, yes. However, my opinion is that you don't need to be too careful after the first couple hours.

I would definitely get the first service, though. They put different break-in fluids and these need to be changed out.

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jkendallmsce

the manual has a breakdown of hours and rpms for the first 10 hours. opinions vary from following the manual exaclty to driving it like you stole it!!

ANd the 10 hour service is critical to get the newly generated chunks/fragments/filings/bubblegum/etc. of metal out of the crankcase and transmission. Fresh oil and a new filter are cheap insurance to ensure your baby runs for 1000's of hours.

Although you can do it your self and save time and money draggin it to the dealer. I think ours was about $250.

But is a good time to get any warranty work done, if there are any.

Edited by jkendallmsce
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Here are the break-in instructions directly from the 2012 Indmar Operator's Manual. (The entire manual is available on Indmar's website).

Break-In

Taking care now to break-in your new Indmar engine is VERY important. When properly broken in, you engine will last longer, run better and require fewer repairs over its lifetime. You new Indmar engine does not require an elaborate break-in procedure, just a little care and common sense for the first 10 hours.

Break-in Tips

  • Always let engine warm up to normal operating temperatures before accelerating.
  • Avoid fast accelerations and don't carry (or pull) a heavy load during this period.
  • If your boat is equipped with ballast tanks, do not use them for the first 10 hours
  • Check engine and transmission fluid levels frequently. During the first 50 to 100 hours, an engine can use more oil than usual. Maintain oil at proper levels at all times but do not overfill.
  • Vary your boat speed during break-in. Do not run at the same speed very long.
  • Observe gauge readings and check for loose mountings, fittings, nuts, bolts and clamps.
  • Report abnormal operation, noises or vibrations to your dealer.

Break-in Steps

For the first hour, do not exceed 2000 RPM; vary RPM continuously.

For the second hour, do not exceed 3000 RPM; vary the RPM regularly.

For the next seven hours, do not exceed 4000 RPM; vary the RPM regularly.

After the first ten hours but before 20 hours of operation take your boat to the dealer for its first engine and transmission oil and filter change and engine checkup. Your Indmar dealer is best equipped to check the engine immediately after break-in

I just completed the break-in period on my new 23 LSV.

Edited by Brent Wall
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for the stack of bills you just laid down, you would be crazy not to follow the manual to the letter and then have your dealer take a look.

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Better safe than sorry for break-in. We completed the break-in period per the manual and had cylinder misfire fault and strange performance at 10.4 hours. Dealer could see we followed manual and we had a new engine from Indmar within 36 hrs.

Major disappointment to have to go through break-in again but No Wake took care of us.

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Taking it as easy as Indmar recommends in the manual is not the proper way to break-in an engine.... Getting a heavy load on the engine during the first couple hours is important to properly seat the piston rings.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Remember- Indmar is in the business of selling engines and parts..... If your engine isn't running good after 1000+ hours (which is won't be if you don't seat those rings properly), they will be selling you a new engine, or parts to rebuild yours. It's not in Indmars best interest to have your engine last forever, just long enough to get through the warranty period. When in doubt, follow the money...

When I picked up my 2010 at the dealer, we were talking a bit about break-in.... He knew how I was going to go about break-in, and was fine with it. He admitted the the "worst" running new boat they have ever seen was one where the owner went out and literally idled around the lake for 10 hours!!! He said the boat had no power, and ran poorly. So, don't do that!!!!

Go out, put a load on the motor- start, after start, after start for a few hours, and you'll be plenty broke in.... Vary that throttle, try to keep a good load on the engine when you're crusing around.

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Taking it as easy as Indmar recommends in the manual is not the proper way to break-in an engine.... Getting a heavy load on the engine during the first couple hours is important to properly seat the piston rings.

http://www.mototuneu..._in_secrets.htm

Remember- Indmar is in the business of selling engines and parts..... If your engine isn't running good after 1000+ hours (which is won't be if you don't seat those rings properly), they will be selling you a new engine, or parts to rebuild yours. It's not in Indmars best interest to have your engine last forever, just long enough to get through the warranty period. When in doubt, follow the money...

When I picked up my 2010 at the dealer, we were talking a bit about break-in.... He knew how I was going to go about break-in, and was fine with it. He admitted the the "worst" running new boat they have ever seen was one where the owner went out and literally idled around the lake for 10 hours!!! He said the boat had no power, and ran poorly. So, don't do that!!!!

Go out, put a load on the motor- start, after start, after start for a few hours, and you'll be plenty broke in.... Vary that throttle, try to keep a good load on the engine when you're crusing around.

Was wondering when Motoman would pop up. lol. Good advice.
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Remember that Ilmor, Indmar, PCM, Mercruiser, etc. are all using GM Marine long blocks. The differences between them are the ECM tune and the accessories. But you can bet that the internals from one long block to the next are the same.

I posted this page from PCM's current owners manual a couple of months ago. Why should PCM and Indmar use such different procedures for the very same internals?

pcmbreakin.jpg

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Taking it as easy as Indmar recommends in the manual is not the proper way to break-in an engine.... Getting a heavy load on the engine during the first couple hours is important to properly seat the piston rings.

Yes, I would take the advice of an unknown person on a public forum before i would follow the instructions of the engine manufacturer and the thousands of engineering development hours they have invested in their product.

Of course, Indmar doesn't use as many exclamation points (!!!) in their whole manual as he does on one webpage, so mabye this guy knows something they don't.

Edited by Soon2BV
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I can guarantee you that that boat will have already been run WOT at least twice before you ever take delivery.

That said, if you dealer recommends you follow the procedure, I'd do it. The key thing is to vary the RPMs, and that fact does not change between the "drive it like you stole it" and the "easy does it" opinions on engine break in.

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Was wondering when Motoman would pop up. lol. Good advice.

It's pretty much the engine break-in bible!

Yes, I would take the advice of an unknown person on a public forum before i would follow the instructions of the engine manufacturer and the thousands of engineering development hours they have invested in their product.

Of course, Indmar doesn't use as many exclamation points (!!!) in their whole manual as he does on one webpage, so mabye this guy knows something they don't.

Talk to an engine builder that builds (and rebuilds) high performance engines. See what they have to say about it.

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The engine is definitely run at WOT a couple times before it ever makes it in your boat.

It is run under varying loads at cold test where it is built in Silao, Mexico.

The marinizer runs it's probably in a hot test when they add all the accessories to it.

Malibu I am guessing runs the engine in the boat.

There are really 2 schools of thought. High loads help seat the piston rings against the cylinder walls, hence WOT runs. Bearings and mating surfaces do not like WOT runs. I work at GM, and have talked to design engineers, and they typically suggest to run the engine to WOT high rpms a couple times, and then take it easy after that for the first couple hours in the break in period.

Either way, CHANGE THE OIL AFTER 5 HOURS OR SO, REGARDLESS OF WHAT THE MANUAL TELLS YOU. As a manufacturing engineer I can tell you A) your engine ships with some sediment in it and B) when the engine breaks it creats it's own internal sediment.

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Taking it as easy as Indmar recommends in the manual is not the proper way to break-in an engine.... Getting a heavy load on the engine during the first couple hours is important to properly seat the piston rings.

Go out, put a load on the motor- start, after start, after start for a few hours, and you'll be plenty broke in.... Vary that throttle, try to keep a good load on the engine when you're crusing around.

My buddy gives essentially the same advice. Take it easy at first, vary the throttle and load through the first hours, then drive it like you're going to for the rest of it's life. He built this car, among many others and gets to see their insides after 5 miles, 50 miles, 5000 miles.

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