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newbie1000

ball valve help

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newbie1000

I bought Apollo bronze ball valves 1" female female. I can only get about four turns on my thruhulls and my hose connectors. I am concerned and bought some brass ball valves at home depot with the .same result. What am I doing wrong? Is this normal? Should I buy different ball valves? Don't want to sink the boat if I can help it.

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Nitrousbird

I just bought a set of Apollos as well, same thing, about 4 turns by hand. I'm sure I will get them further once I put a pipe wrench on it. I'll also be putting thread sealant on the threads for piece of mind. Though it doesn't thread all the way to the bottom, I think it is more than enough to be sturdy and leak-proof - I wouldn't worry about it.

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newbie1000

I wonder why they don't thread correctly. I know that wakemakers sells a different ball valve. I wonder if that valve would thread all the way on. It just seems strange to have your safety valve on so precariously.

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New2Texas

There 2 kinds of thread. go to Home Depot with your parts and test them in the store.

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newbie1000

I now know there are two thread types after doing some research are there ball valves with NPS threads? Home depot only had one ball valve type and it was NPT threaded.

Edited by newbie1000

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CoMtnBu

NPT threads won't go very far by hand since the taper creates a mechanical seal as well. Use some thread sealer and a pipe wrench and call it good.

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TallRedRider

This seems to thread nicely, and got several full turns. Although I think what was said above is fine, I found this to give me a much better feeling of confidence. I initially had a ball valve that would not thread more than a little. The different threads did not mate up well. I never gave it a leak test, but the original OEM stuff seemed to 'feel' the best to me.

http://www.bakesonli...il.aspx?ID=1220

Edited by TallRedRider

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BG2085

those through hulls are nps...national pipe straight.......npt is the taper as mentioned above which is to be used with tapered male threads. Personally, i would do it right when anything is connected under the water line. Im almost sunk a bay boat i had one time because a faulty valve connection related to a baitwell intake. didnt know anything was wrong until water was pouring out of the back compartments (and out of my pants!)

Edited by BG2085

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dtb

Question on the stainless valve linked to by TallRed - would there potentially be an issue with dissimilar metals and galvanic corrosion if this stainless valve were threaded into a bronze thru-hull fitting???

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wdr

I don't think that could happen because neither metal is being exposed to an electric current of any kind. They are isolated from any potential current by the plastic body of the pump and the fiberglass hull. I have read (might of been on here) that if you put any aftermarket fittings onto the powertrain and it touches any part of the powertrain i.e. metal to metal contact like a bronze elbow for an inline water filter, to use nylon fittings. This is because the fitting will essentially degrade the anodes ability to do its' job and turn the fitting into an anode.

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dtb

I am not sure that is true. The water touching both components is conductive and serves as the electrolyte. I think that is all it takes....but I am not certain....both materials in this case may be resistant enough to corrosion that it may be safe. I was trying to think of somewhere else in the boat where stainless is touching bronze - such as the obvious one which is prop to prop shaft. So maybe that is proof enough that there would not be an issue.

Did I just answer my own question? :)

Edited by dtb

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