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BearCreekBum

New Amp Install

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BearCreekBum

I know this is a rookie mistake but just wanted to verify my ASSUMPTIONS.

I was replacing the amp that serves my cabin speakers yesterday and had the Perko switch to OFF and ASSUMED that no voltage was present. Disconnect the existing amp and trying to figure out how to mount the new one and I bump the exposed power leads together. Sparks fly and I manage not to wet my pants. I need to remove the batteries anyway and do this and check for voltage. There is still 12 volts present.

I assume that this voltage is coming from some capacitors in the tower amp which is still connected. When I disconnect the power leads on the tower amp I finally have zero volts.

If an amp has capacitors is there an internal resistor to bleed off the voltage after a certain time? I know that industrial capacitors discharge after 5 minutes.

I've also decided that wakeboarding and stereo installs are a young man's game. Back and shoulders are killing be today.

Thanks

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jk13

Most amps that I've dealt with do not have an internal resistor to discharge when disconnected.

Easiest is to take a test light with an actual light bulb in it (not l.e.d.) and connect it to the power and ground leads of the amp. When the light goes out, it's discharged. I've had to do this with some of my older a/d/s/ stuff that has a decent amount of capacitance built in.

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shawndoggy

LOL, I like JK13's answer a lot better. I clearly misread the question!

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Earmark Marine

Any capacitors in the input of an amplifier will self-dissipate after a little while. I wouldn't be too concerned from the spark unless you accidentally reversed polarity. It helps to wear Depends when wiring.

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h2ojunkie

"Lighten" up..... Earmark (David) has been alot of help to many on this forum,,IMHO. BearCreekBum, sorry for the sparks,but I got a good laugh in at your expense. I have always tried to disconnect the batteries, never had any sparky situations. Hope the instal goes smooth from here on out. Post pics if ya can.

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old skool malibu

Good on ya for asking the question..I am going to pull my batteries and let everything set for a while before beginning work. Would hate to fry an amp!

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Earmark Marine

jk13 has the right answer using the test light DC bulb to empty the stored energy. On a side note, many have damaged the fragile preamp outputs in cheaper HUs by plugging RCAs into an amplifier that is on.

David

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old skool malibu

Time for a group hug! Dont want the hammer to come down again...

post-4887-0-79132900-1332801589_thumb.gi

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Malibudude

All posts that are inflammatory and not on topic have been removed. Keep it on topic and read the TOU. If you can not abide by them and be civil you'll be shown the door.

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