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Iron gator

Alternator Upgrade?

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Iron gator

I'm in the middle of a stereo upgrade, and Im thinking I will need an upgraded alternator. Does anyone know what the output is from the stock 2011 247 wake setter alternator? Stereo upgrade consists of 5 amps totaling 3200 watts. Not sure what is available as far as better alternators, or how much I'll need.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

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Bobby Light

Stock alternator is rated at 90, but probably puts out closer to 100. You might want to check with your dealer, I heard indmar won't be friendly with any warranty stuff if you change out the alternator. You'd be better off with a solid battery bank, I'd suggest Four 6v golf cart batteries and a nice onboard charger.

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WakesetterE

Check out my effective solution which has not failed me yet. If you sit long periods playing it cranked, then it is not a good plan for you. If you drive and listen to it cranked, my alternator should keep up fine. I am running about 3k watts, also. Of course as we know, some amps are more efficient than others. Essentially you need more batteries, a larger alternator (200amp?), and upgraded wiring to begin with.

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WakesetterE

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Iron gator

Thanks!

Come to think of it, we do tend to sit and play the stereo a lot, however , it usually isn't turned up that much during those times. I assume that the amps draw less current at low volume settings?

I guess additional batteries are in order. We tend to dry camp and use the boat for several days at a time. So maybe alternator and battery upgrades?

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Bobby Light

Thanks!

Come to think of it, we do tend to sit and play the stereo a lot, however , it usually isn't turned up that much during those times. I assume that the amps draw less current at low volume settings?

I guess additional batteries are in order. We tend to dry camp and use the boat for several days at a time. So maybe alternator and battery upgrades?

Amps rarely use and out out full power during listening. I would put your money towards batteries and onboard charger first, then an alternator if you're still feeling froggy.

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Earmark Marine

Irongateer,

Alternators are rated for intermittent use with higher rpms to achieve those ratings. So you don't want to be dependent on that number for continuous duty.

Generally the stereo system draw is only part of the concern. After a prolonged period at rest playing the stereo hard you have to consider the additional amperage draw of depeleted batteries. The larger the bank reserves plus the greater depth of depletion the more amperage draw you will add to the boat operations and the stereo load.

The amplifiers will draw more or less current based on the volume. For example if you play the system at what you perceive to be half volume you will draw around 1/10th the amperage. Music is very dynamic in nature so you are normally not pulling anywhere close to the continuous rating. However, if you run the system into soft clipping (full power) you introduce compression and the amplifiers draw an inordinate amount of power in comparison.

Depending on usage the stock alternator may not be able to fully restore the batteries before you trailer the boat. A smart AC shore charger ensures that your batteries are performing at or close to their original ratings and starting off the day with fully charged batteries makes a big difference....especially to your alternator.

Class D amplifiers are 60 percent more efficient than Class AB amplifiers so this alone can make a substantial difference in the current draw. There are other system design and execution elements that can potentially double or halve your current draw. Tuning is just one of these contributors.

So it can be a combination of things. But a little extra battery reserves plus a shore charger matched to your battery capacity should allow you to get by without an alternator upgrade. Plus, you don't have to recharge depleted batteries and play the stereo simultaneously. Having an ACR and a corresponding manual switch gives you plenty of charging system management options for a variety of circumstances.

David

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Wakesetter67

I'm in the middle of a stereo upgrade, and Im thinking I will need an upgraded alternator. Does anyone know what the output is from the stock 2011 247 wake setter alternator? Stereo upgrade consists of 5 amps totaling 3200 watts. Not sure what is available as far as better alternators, or how much I'll need.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Just for comparison, I ran 2 Group 29 battery's that ran 3 amps 3300 watts, I have the pro Mariner on board charger, and I think I have the smaller rated alternator, (330 LCR Motor) And the only time I had any issues with not being able to maintain my Batteries was on a long Camping trip, usally towards the end of a 5 day trip did I notice low battery's, And believe me my tunes were usually cranked for most of it.. On normal weekend I had no issues at all, I recently added another amp and just upgraded to 2 6V 2400 interstate Golf car battery's to aid on the long dry camp weeks, So I would try that first, I dont think to many people have done the alternator upgrade, I have thought about it, but seem this upgrade was alot easier, Plus I can always add 2 more 6v if needed,

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nyryan2001

Are you guys seeing the same 12.6 and 12.7 on a full charge out of the series'd 6v golf Cart batteries?

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Bobby Light

Are you guys seeing the same 12.6 and 12.7 on a full charge out of the series'd 6v golf Cart batteries?

Yes.

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Iron gator

In the past, I charged with a small 2 amp battery maintainer that plugged into the cig lighter near the helm, and my batteries always seemed fully charged and never had a problem. I think my amps are fairly efficient ones, but I'm not sure. I have 2 Alpine PDX 600.1s driving the subs, 2 wet sounds syn 4s driving the towers, and a fosgate 400.4 driving the in-boats. Is there an advantage to one of those larger shore chargers that everyone seems to have ?

Lots of very helpful info on here, thanks!

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Iron gator

One more question, Is it better to keep my 2 existing 12v batteries, and just add 1 or 2 more 12volts, or trash the 12volts and go to 2 or 4- 6volts?

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Bobby Light

I would keep one of your existing batteries for a reserve and get a couple interstate SRM-29 or two 6v batteries for house/stereo. You'll want a good onboard charger with thise, that 2 amp charger won't cut it.

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Earmark Marine

Irongateer,

Here is the defining line for the difference between a battery tender/maintainer/trickle/minder and a true high current battery charger. If you have a vehicle like a weekend car, ATV, motorcycle, tractor, etc. then you are placing the vehicle into long term storage with a fully charged battery. So a low capacity maintainer is perfect for countering the self discharge (typically several percent a month) and keeps the batteries from degradation in a discharged state.

Now, if you have an application where you are deeply cycling the batteries (a stereo at rest or a trolling motor for example) then these small capacity chargers are not going to be able to exercise the battery and properly desulphate. It will take more current to chemically excite the battery and return the sulphates to the solution. Sulphation of a battery is like a sedentary lifestyle leading to clogged arteries. Eventually the battery will heat up but will not take a deep charge. So undercharging is as unhealthy as overcharging.

If you have a collective battery(s) capacity of 200 amp/hours then you want a 20 amp charger or 10 to 13 percent. As the bank becomes larger you want a larger charger. It's not a matter of recharge time. It is a matter of proper conditioning.

You want a dual-bank multi-stage smart charger. Once you cross the 20 amp threshold you will find most chargers will be a three-bank. While a three-bank presents no advantage there is no disadvantage either.

The worst thing you could ever do is use an emergency garage charger (low/high/boost) and turn your back on it.

David

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Iron gator

Thanks for the help everyone!

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