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maliblu

I Want A New Prop, Looking For Advice.

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maliblu

I have a 1989 Sunsetter and I want to replace the original 13X13 prop with a new one. When I first got the boat the motor would rev to around 6000rpms at full throttle, we dont use the boat for much more than cruising around the lake and once and a while I slalomn ski or I will pull a tube around. Looking for less reving and a little more top end speed I took the prop off and had a local guy add some pitch and he cupped the prop. This did not work at all it just lugged the motor and took a lot out of the top speed, so I took it back to the guy and he took some of the pitch out which made it better but I still liked the untouched version better, it just seems now like you driving around with the brakes on to keep it from reving. Does anybody have any suggestions on a prop that will give me the most top end with out killing the low end performance, 3 or 4 blade, cnc'd, more pitch or just a 13X13 stock replacement?

Thanks, Dennis

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REW

I have a CNC'd 13X13 on an 04 wakesetter DD. Mine wont rev to 6000, It wont rev to 4800 for that matter. :crazy: I know the cnc props are more effecient and better made. I would call acme and talk to one of those guys. They will have some engineered information for you.

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Bozboat

I wouldn't want to hit 6000 rpm. Something seems out of whack, as the original propeller shouldn't let the boat hit more than the 4800 rpm redline?

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REW

I wouldn't want to hit 6000 rpm. Something seems out of whack, as the original propeller shouldn't let the boat hit more than the 4800 rpm redline?

Tack issue maybe? :unsure:

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BFrank

I have a 1989 Sunsetter and I want to replace the original 13X13 prop with a new one. When I first got the boat the motor would rev to around 6000rpms at full throttle, we dont use the boat for much more than cruising around the lake and once and a while I slalomn ski or I will pull a tube around. Looking for less reving and a little more top end speed I took the prop off and had a local guy add some pitch and he cupped the prop. This did not work at all it just lugged the motor and took a lot out of the top speed, so I took it back to the guy and he took some of the pitch out which made it better but I still liked the untouched version better, it just seems now like you driving around with the brakes on to keep it from reving. Does anybody have any suggestions on a prop that will give me the most top end with out killing the low end performance, 3 or 4 blade, cnc'd, more pitch or just a 13X13 stock replacement?

Thanks, Dennis

Is your stock prop a 3 blade?

Edited by BFrank

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85 Barefoot

How fast was 6000 rpm? If your tach is right, you def need to get those rpms down, especially on a carbed boat. I've been told by a prop manufacturer that they don't want a carb past 4600-4800. You should have a sticker on top of the valve cover that says maximum recommended RPM range. You should base your prop selection on that. Furthermore, you cannot get a "stock replacement" 13x13 for that boat anymore (or would have to have one custom made). Those props were cast, they are cnc'd now which allows bigger blade surface. I've found that a reduction in pitch will still give same top end performance as compared to a smaller steeper cast prop. I'd actually suggest a 13x12 3 blade.

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Malibudude

Definitely the 13x12 will provide you the best cross performance whether from OJ or Acme. I ran that on my SLXI and found it to be a huge improvement over the stock.....night and day performance. You 'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner.

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jeepdude2

I have the same boat.

went with a 4 blade OJ.

gained a better hole shot and a little over 1mph top end.

if you ask nicely they will recondition your original for free with purchase of a new one.

i'm very satisfied

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Bozboat

I have the same boat.

went with a 4 blade OJ.

gained a better hole shot and a little over 1mph top end.

if you ask nicely they will recondition your original for free with purchase of a new one.

i'm very satisfied

How many RPMs do you get?

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jeepdude2

How many RPMs do you get?

i'm right at 4800

I cant remember my pitch.

But if you call OJ or Acme, they will set you up with the perfect prop for what you are looking to accomplish.

Edited by jeepdude2

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maliblu

Is your stock prop a 3 blade?

Yes it is a 3 blade

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h2ojunkie

IMHO,, Check out the OJ props vs the Acme's CNC's. I have had both (5 total) and the OJ's perform as good or better in some cases than the Acme's. Biggest thing for me has been durability. We occasionally hit some "floatsome stuff" in the river we run in alot and the Acme's get tweaked to easily. The OJ's have been way more durable. Both great performance but I had my Acme's repaired many times, OJ's NONE, Enough said for me.

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maliblu

How fast was 6000 rpm? If your tach is right, you def need to get those rpms down, especially on a carbed boat. I've been told by a prop manufacturer that they don't want a carb past 4600-4800. You should have a sticker on top of the valve cover that says maximum recommended RPM range. You should base your prop selection on that. Furthermore, you cannot get a "stock replacement" 13x13 for that boat anymore (or would have to have one custom made). Those props were cast, they are cnc'd now which allows bigger blade surface. I've found that a reduction in pitch will still give same top end performance as compared to a smaller steeper cast prop. I'd actually suggest a 13x12 3 blade.

I think it was somewhere 43-45. I figured I could get away more pitch to load the motor more and maybe gain some mile an hour. I'm not sure how much he changed the pitch and the cupping looks way too hillbilly for me. Instantly you could feel that it wasnt right, the rpms are down around the 4800 range but the boat wouldnt even go 40 anymore and the holeshot sucked, so I took it back and he took some pitch out and it got better maybe will hit 40 now but I know there is something better out there than hammer and dolly prop technology.

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maliblu

I have the same boat.

went with a 4 blade OJ.

gained a better hole shot and a little over 1mph top end.

if you ask nicely they will recondition your original for free with purchase of a new one.

i'm very satisfied

I dont know 4 blade or 3, from what I've read 3 will give you the best top speed, 4 blade will give you the best hole shot but give up a mile or two on top end. Yesterday I read that 4 blade could possibly increase you miles per gal and actually be more efficient every place other than top end which is sounding better all the time, part throttle cruising around the lake is mostly what we will be doing with this old dog anyway.

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maliblu

Tack issue maybe? :unsure:

Not sure how accurate the tach is Ive never double checked it. But after prop was worked on it took the rpms to less than 5000.

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maliblu

IMHO,, Check out the OJ props vs the Acme's CNC's. I have had both (5 total) and the OJ's perform as good or better in some cases than the Acme's. Biggest thing for me has been durability. We occasionally hit some "floatsome stuff" in the river we run in alot and the Acme's get tweaked to easily. The OJ's have been way more durable. Both great performance but I had my Acme's repaired many times, OJ's NONE, Enough said for me.

Thank's was leaning towards OJ so its good to know.

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Oberon

I replace my stainless with an OJ CNC 13x12 and couldn't be happier. There is noticeably less vibration and a better hole shot. I haven't tested top speed with either since I really don't care.

Do yourself a favor and search "CVP prop". They have a history of throwing blades and given the work that has been done to yours I think its probably a candidate. I found cracks in mine.

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85 Barefoot

I replace my stainless with an OJ CNC 13x12 and couldn't be happier. There is noticeably less vibration and a better hole shot. I haven't tested top speed with either since I really don't care.

Do yourself a favor and search "CVP prop". They have a history of throwing blades and given the work that has been done to yours I think its probably a candidate. I found cracks in mine.

That's only for stainless. I don't think they were used in the 1989 era.

As for discussion on 3 vs 4 blade, generally speaking, comments are correct but I would disagree that 4 blade gives better economy. Reason is its more drag and friction which is why it's "slower". That said, difference is probably negligible. Fourblades are generally better when you need more "traction". Think heavy boats. They dno't put four blades on slalom boats because speed to wind up and efficiency at speed is ideal. In other words, it's slipping through the water easier. Some say they have better ski wake with four blade. That's not been my experience which is the opposite. A sunsetter is kind of in the middle. It sounds like speed is a priority for you, I'd go three blade.

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Oberon

That's only for stainless. I don't think they were used in the 1989 era.

My mistake. He should look it up anyway and be thankful they hadn't thought up such a time bomb in 1989.

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Gopackgo

That's only for stainless. I don't think they were used in the 1989 era.

As for discussion on 3 vs 4 blade, generally speaking, comments are correct but I would disagree that 4 blade gives better economy. Reason is its more drag and friction which is why it's "slower". That said, difference is probably negligible. Fourblades are generally better when you need more "traction". Think heavy boats. They dno't put four blades on slalom boats because speed to wind up and efficiency at speed is ideal. In other words, it's slipping through the water easier. Some say they have better ski wake with four blade. That's not been my experience which is the opposite. A sunsetter is kind of in the middle. It sounds like speed is a priority for you, I'd go three blade.

I like the 4 blade OJ legend for slalom the best, not because of the wake or speed but because the pull on starts is so much easier, the torque is there for the heavy dudes w/o ripping the handle out. If you ski with fat old guys, you cant beat a 4 blade, the linear power delivery is like budda.

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