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Murphy8166

Tools for Winterization

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Murphy8166

During the winter we keep the boat in dry storage about 45 minutes from the house. I am going to go up this weekend and drain the block and vdrive till the next time we use it.

I want to have all the proper tools with me to get the job done in one trip. All that I am looking to do is drain the water out of the motor. Fluids have already been changed and stabil added and run through engine. Not going to fog or use antifreeze.

I figured these tools would get the job done....please let me know if I missed anything.

Allen Wrenches

Socket Set

Crescent Wrench

Box End Wrenches

Screwdrivers

Nut Drives

What else. Thanks guys for the help

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wdr

Battery charger?

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Murphy8166

Battery charger?

I got that covered - but great suggestion!

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Murphy8166

I decided to give my dealer as call and he gave me the exact tool list. I figured I post it up for those who may have the same question.

1/2" wrench

1" stubby wrench (this is for the knock sensors)

5/16" nut driver

9/16" wrench (this is for the V drive)

He also mentioned that a hose pry tool (booger picker) will come in handy. Harbor freight has them reasonably priced so I am going to go and get one.

http://www.harborfreight.com/8-inch-radiator-hose-pick-96572.html

I will let you know how it goes

Edited by Murphy8166

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Ndawg12

take your heavy purse

maybe a medium sized pair of channel locks in case the garden hose connection is tight.

Edited by Ndawg12

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Murphy8166

take your heavy purse

What does that mean???

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wdr

Shop rags, beers and if your like me an A$$ load of band aids! :Doh:

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Molarbu

I have to use a 1" deep socket for my plugs, yours might be different. I only mention it because it's not included in most socket sets!

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Ndawg12

What does that mean???

:biggrin: Sometimes things are too tight for you to get off by hand or the suggested tools so we recommend hitting it with your purse or asking your husband to help....

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Murphy8166

:biggrin: Sometimes things are too tight for you to get off by hand or the suggested tools so we recommend hitting it with your purse or asking your husband to help....

Thanks!! - I get it.

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Michigan boarder

Sounds like you got it covered. Maybe a couple of missed items:

- portable air compressor...have you topped off the tires lately?

- grease gun...have you topped off the hubs?

- rubbing compound and wax...if you scuff it doing something, it's nice to repair it quickly

- bail money (you never know)

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rjgogo

A zip lock bag to put the parts in so you don't lose them. Stick on on the throttle.

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tideride

Other Items I would take to my indoor storage facility - Light Source (Flashlight/Shop Light), Shop Vac, Extension Cord, Spray cleaner - probably already on the boat.

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Levi900RR

A hot dog, a long screwdriver and a hand held torch. Just in case you get hungry... :biggrin:

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Indyxc

I hate that our boat uses standard fasteners. There is usually a close metric tool, but sometimes not close enough, like V drive plugs.

Grease gun is a good idea for rudder- Although I think your year may no longer have zerk fititngs on rudder.

Edited by Indyxc

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Bozboat

One or two 1911 Kimbers and spare mags.

My apologies, just noticed you were from Dallas, so my post is really only a reminder for the benefit of those from other places.

Edited by Bozboat

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REW

:biggrin: Sometimes things are too tight for you to get off by hand or the suggested tools so we recommend hitting it with your purse or asking your husband to help....

If you are in a tight space you might need your clutch as well :biggrin:

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REW

Sounds like you got it covered. Maybe a couple of missed items:

- portable air compressor...have you topped off the tires lately?

- grease gun...have you topped off the hubs?

- rubbing compound and wax...if you scuff it doing something, it's nice to repair it quickly

- bail money (you never know)

:rofl::lol::rofl:

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srab

Impeller puller?

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Soon2BV

Miniature / stubby screwdriver or smaller sockets socket set for the impeller cover, and then the impeller puller referenced above.

And I find the lipstick case can be used in place of a small hammer in tight spots.

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REW

Miniature / stubby screwdriver or smaller sockets socket set for the impeller cover, and then the impeller puller referenced above.

And I find the lipstick case can be used in place of a small hammer in tight spots.

:rofl: We will add that on to the list :thumbup:

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signguy

If you are in a tight space you might need your clutch as well :biggrin:

LOL. I had to chuckle as I pictured someone smashing a fancy clutch against a socket wrench down in the engine compartment......

Is Murphy a Lady or did I miss something?

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dlb

Don't forget you compact. That mirror will come in handy!

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Steve B.

Maybe a grease gun for bearings and steering cable. Dry gas. Laundry sheets? I used them once to make it smell nice and supposedly varmints dont like them.

I put mine away today too.

Steve B.

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BSUBU_Kris

Just did mine yesterday. I just used a crescent wrench and screw driver. A nut driver would have been nice as a standard sized screw driver didn't really fit the slot in the hose clamp very well. I also used the inflator for our water toys to blow out the heater core as well as the V-drive.

I also brought two of the damprid moisture absorbers to leave in the boat. I also brought a plastic storage bin to put the damprid absorbers in just in case they over flowed or leaked as I didn't want anything getting on the carpet. I leave the cover on in the storage unit over the winter and don't want any noisier in there as noisier will likely cause mold.

I was surprised how much water came out. You should plan to drain the bilge when you are done. A shop vac would help to suck out any water that won't drain through the bilge drain. I like the bilge to be as dry as possible before putting the cover on. A sham-wow type towel and bucket will be handy if you don't have a wet/dry vacuum.

As other mentioned a shop light would be good if working inside.

Was sad that I won't be using the boat for the next few months but we put 110 hours on it this year so no complaints.

This boat was much easier than the Centurion I had prior to winterize as it was easier to get to the drain points in the Malibu.

Kris

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