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Sneezedoc

battery replacement

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Sneezedoc

I have 2 batteries and a Perko switch on my '09 23 LSV . I need to replace one of the batteries. Any thoughts about making one of the 2 a gel cell cell? I have , presently, two 800CCA batteries Thanks!

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DONTW8

This has been discussed here and on the RV sites.

The bottom line is that you are best served not mixing the two types.

The best argument for the AGM type batteries is that you do not have leakage problems.

I replaced my stock battery with an Optima battery in my battery eating sportscar many years ago.

The Optima did not outlast the standard wet cell.

If you are running your stereo a lot when just "gunkholin' " you can make the argument to buy two of the

GC - 2 golf cart 6 volt batteries at Costco if you are in the habit of running them down. You would hook them up in series and the Perko would not come into play.

Heck, Doc buy two of the AGM batteries. They're so pretty. :crazy:

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WakesetterE

You can add an AGM type battery if you like; however, the two batteries do prefer different charging rates. I have run a lead acid and a AGM together with no issue for years now. In most situations, its no problem at all to mix them. However, like DONTW8 said above, the big question is why buy an AGM? IMO the only real reason to have a AGM battery is the lack of having to add water to the cells occasionally. The lead acid and AGM have the similar performance otherwise in our boats. My batteries are in battery boxes and strapped down, so I'm not going to spill either one. The only real issue is that the lead acid battery in a hot environment evaporates its water faster and thus has to have water added more frequently. The AGM doesnt require water be added. If you don’t plan or don’t want to add water to your battery occasionally, then the nearly double price for the AGM is a great deal. The life expectancy of a properly maintained lead acid battery and an AGM are very similar, however, many allow the lead acid battery to run low on water, causing damage to the plates, shortening its life considerably.

AGM's advantages:

  • Purer lead in the plates, as each plate no longer needs to support its own weight, due to the sandwich construction with AGM matting. Traditional cells must support their own weight in the bath of acid.
  • Fluid retention – un-spillable
  • High specific power or power density, holding roughly 1.5x the AH capacity of flooded batteries due to purer lead[citation needed]
  • Low internal resistance allowing them to be charged and discharged quite rapidly
  • Depth of discharge for optimal performance is up to 80% while flooded batteries can only be rated up to 50% depth of discharge
  • Water conservation – never requires addition of water
  • Acid encapsulation in the matting
  • Operation well below 0°F or −18 °C.
  • Availability of UL, DOT, CE, Coast Guard, and Mil-Spec approved types
  • Vibration resistance due to the sandwich construction

Disadvantages:

  • Cost. AGM automobile batteries for example, are typically about twice the price of flooded-cell batteries in a given BCI size group.
  • AGM batteries have up to a 10-year lifespan.
  • AGM batteries do not tolerate overcharging. Overcharging dissociates the water in the electrolyte, which is unable to be replaced, leading to premature failure.

The only real world advanges I experiance in my boat is not having to add water to the battery. I run AGM's in all of my vehicles, as I never check the water levals in those batteries.

Nearly all if not all vehicles since 1976 have come with an AGM battery, as without full service gas stations, the old lead acid battery water levals never seemed to get checked.

However, a quick re-read of the intial post referances gel batteries, which are similiar but slightly different tha standard AGM batteries. A gel battery (also known as a "gel cell") is a VRLA battery with a gelified electrolyte; the sulfuric acid is mixed with silica fume, which makes the resulting mass gel-like and immobile. These are even more expensive than AGM's with similiar or slightly worse perfomance.

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Sneezedoc

You can add an AGM type battery if you like; however, the two batteries do prefer different charging rates. I have run a lead acid and a AGM together with no issue for years now. In most situations, its no problem at all to mix them. However, like DONTW8 said above, the big question is why buy an AGM? IMO the only real reason to have a AGM battery is the lack of having to add water to the cells occasionally. The lead acid and AGM have the similar performance otherwise in our boats. My batteries are in battery boxes and strapped down, so I'm not going to spill either one. The only real issue is that the lead acid battery in a hot environment evaporates its water faster and thus has to have water added more frequently. The AGM doesnt require water be added. If you don’t plan or don’t want to add water to your battery occasionally, then the nearly double price for the AGM is a great deal. The life expectancy of a properly maintained lead acid battery and an AGM are very similar, however, many allow the lead acid battery to run low on water, causing damage to the plates, shortening its life considerably.

AGM's advantages:

  • Purer lead in the plates, as each plate no longer needs to support its own weight, due to the sandwich construction with AGM matting. Traditional cells must support their own weight in the bath of acid.
  • Fluid retention – un-spillable
  • High specific power or power density, holding roughly 1.5x the AH capacity of flooded batteries due to purer lead[citation needed]
  • Low internal resistance allowing them to be charged and discharged quite rapidly
  • Depth of discharge for optimal performance is up to 80% while flooded batteries can only be rated up to 50% depth of discharge
  • Water conservation – never requires addition of water
  • Acid encapsulation in the matting
  • Operation well below 0°F or −18 °C.
  • Availability of UL, DOT, CE, Coast Guard, and Mil-Spec approved types
  • Vibration resistance due to the sandwich construction

Disadvantages:

  • Cost. AGM automobile batteries for example, are typically about twice the price of flooded-cell batteries in a given BCI size group.
  • AGM batteries have up to a 10-year lifespan.
  • AGM batteries do not tolerate overcharging. Overcharging dissociates the water in the electrolyte, which is unable to be replaced, leading to premature failure.

The only real world advanges I experiance in my boat is not having to add water to the battery. I run AGM's in all of my vehicles, as I never check the water levals in those batteries.

Nearly all if not all vehicles since 1976 have come with an AGM battery, as without full service gas stations, the old lead acid battery water levals never seemed to get checked.

However, a quick re-read of the intial post referances gel batteries, which are similiar but slightly different tha standard AGM batteries. A gel battery (also known as a "gel cell") is a VRLA battery with a gelified electrolyte; the sulfuric acid is mixed with silica fume, which makes the resulting mass gel-like and immobile. These are even more expensive than AGM's with similiar or slightly worse perfomance.

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Sneezedoc

thanks for the reply...I learned a lot!!

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