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eubanks

Winterization again!

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eubanks

Could someone help a newbie with the number and location of all the plugs to pull to drain our Monsoon? Also, the best way and which hoses to disconnect?

Thanks!

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stusumm

There are 2 plugs and 3 hoses to disconnect.

On your v-drive there is a brass plug on the drivers side of the engine located at the bottom of the block. On the passenger side in about the same location you will see the knock sensor screwed into the block. Carefully pinch the sides of the wire harness to remove from the plug. Then unscrew the knock sensor from the block. This will drain the block.

Hoses -

1. Remove the hose from the impeller housing that runs from the transmission to the impeller. On the V-drive it will be on the one that runs on the passenger side of the block.

2. Separate the 2 hoses that run under the engine. It is a garden hose type connection. (drains manifold)

3. Circulating pump - on the front of the engine (facing rear on the v-drive) remove the bottom of the large diameter elbow shaped hose. This is closest to the passenger side for the v-drive as well. Water will drain from the pump.

It will help to be a contortionist, and you will make a liar out of the 75 pound limit warning sticker for your side engine compartments.

I hope this make some sort of sense. Crazy.gif

Edited by stusumm

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Chia
There are 2 plugs and 3 hoses to disconnect.

On your v-drive there is a brass plug on the drivers side of the engine located at the bottom of the block.  On the passenger side in about the same location you will see the knock sensor screwed into the block.  Carefully pinch the sides of the wire harness to remove from the plug.  Then unscrew the knock sensor from the block.  This will drain the block.

Hoses -

1. Remove the hose from the impeller housing that runs from the transmission to the impeller.  On the V-drive it will be on the one that runs on the passenger side of the block.

2.  Separate the 2 hoses that run under the engine.  It is a garden hose type connection.  (drains manifold)

3.  Raw water pump -  on the front of the engine (facing rear on the v-drive)  remove the bottom of the large diameter elbow shaped hose.  This is closest to the passenger side for the v-drive as well.  Water will drain from the pump. 

It will help to be a contortionist,  and you will make a liar out of the 75 pound limit warning sticker for your side engine compartments. 

I hope this make some sort of sense.  Crazy.gif

Do you really have to remove the hose from the impeller housing. It does drain into the manifold which is drained with the garden hose connection?

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stusumm

That's what my dealer recommends. A good amount of water usually comes out. BICBW :unsure:

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vette-ski

First off, I work on the anal side of things since I replaced the engine that the previous owner let freeze. So I've seen what can happen to my boat if it's not winterized.

With that said, I pulled most all of the hoses off. I believe the hose he is referring to is the main inlet hose that goes from the v-drive all the way back to the raw pump - I'm not aware of any hose from the trans to the impeller housing. It is the lowest part on the water path, and it will hold water. Draining the manifolds won't do anything for that hose. Due to it's length, it sags and holds water. It is a rubber hose, so it is probably fine even if it does freeze, but I wanted every drop of water out of mine. I pulled both hoses off of the raw water pump (inlet hose previously mentioned and outlet hose up to the trans cooler), and both of them were holding water. Completely removing the hose up to the trans cooler is a good idea anyway to clean debris from the cooler. I also think I got water out when I popped the large hose off of the engine circulating pump. It has a big elbow shape that hangs down and holds water.

There's also a drain plug in the v-drive. Most of the water will naturally drain out via the thru-hull water inlet fitting. But there are some pockets in the v-drive that can hold water.

IMO, when doing a DIY winterization where you are ultimately responsible for whether the engine freezes or not, the extra time it takes to do a few hose clamps is worth the peace of mind of knowing there is no water in there.

Oh, don't forget to drain the heater if you have one.

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stusumm
 

With that said, I pulled most all of the hoses off.  I believe the hose he is referring to is the main inlet hose that goes from the v-drive all the way back to the raw pump - I'm not aware of any hose from the trans to the impeller housing.

That is the hose I'm referring to but the impeller is in between the vdrive and the T-stat, circulating pump.

Edited by stusumm

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vette-ski
 

With that said, I pulled most all of the hoses off.  I believe the hose he is referring to is the main inlet hose that goes from the v-drive all the way back to the raw pump - I'm not aware of any hose from the trans to the impeller housing.

That is the hose I'm referring to but the impeller is in between the vdrive and the T-stat, raw water pump.

I'm not sure I completely understand what you are saying. The impeller is the raw water pump.

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SGY

The raw water pump is what draws the water in from the lake. It's belt driven and uses the impeller to draw water. The water goes from their to your T-stat/exhaust jackets. The pump and hoses attached to it will hold water because it's at the lowest point. At least pull the hose off the exit side of the raw water pump and most of the water will flow out. The exit side is easier to remove on my Nautique. The hose on the inlet side is more rigid and takes gorilla hands to remove. And there is not much room to get my hands in there.

I like those merc fittings. Very easy and less chance of getting clogged. My plugs/quick drain valves from SkiDim are nice but you have to be careful that debris doesn't block the drain. I alway spray some compressed air up the valve to make sure its clear.

Not to hijack this thread but does anyone here use a bilge heater? I'm thinking of buying one for early next spring. Any comments?

Edited by SGY

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jmack

My boat has always been in a garage for the winter, but it will be stored outside for the first time this year. Although I've always pulled the recommended hoses and plugs, this year just to be extra sure there was nothing that could freeze, I just filled the system with antifreeze.

I made a "Y" adapter with shut-off valves out of PVC and hooked it up to a fake-a-lake. One side I hooked to a garden hose, and from the other I ran a hose into 5 gallons of antifreeze. I sat the bucket of antifreeze up on a workbench so the siphon action would help as the impeller pulled it into the system.

I ran the motor on the garden hose until it was up to temperature to make sure the thermostat was open, then used the "Y" to swap over to the antifreeze. After all of the antifreeze was used, I shut off the motor and drained some of the liquid from the block and checked it - I'm protected down to -5 degrees!

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vette-ski

jmack - we had a post going on this not long ago, but to make a long story short you don't need to wait for the stat to open. The block will fill with the stat closed. The stat keeps water from exiting the block, not entering. I'm not sure where you are but -5 won't cut it here. If you are using the pink antifreeze, some of us can't do what you do. You do not want to dilute the pink stuff. So if the engine is full of water, it must be drained before pulling in the a/f, or it will be diluted. That's where everyone gets hung up - the fear that the stat closes in the time it takes to drain everything. But it's a moot point. But at least you measured what you drained out and if -5 is good in your region, then you should be ok.

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Baddog

Better safe than sorry. My policy is to remove all hoses that you can and THEN blow copious amounts of compressed air thrugh eveything to insure all is dry.

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HRemington
Better safe than sorry.  My policy is to remove all hoses that you can and THEN blow copious amounts of compressed air thrugh eveything to insure all is dry.

uh oh...I feel a spirited, albeit misguided, grammar lesson coming on from our friend at Tuscarora...

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denjoe

Pics of the different locations would be great if anyone has them.

Joe

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Lakenut
Could someone help a newbie with the number and location of all the plugs to pull to drain our Monsoon? Also, the best way and which hoses to disconnect?

Sounds like you are getting ready for the same weather we are up here in the Sooner Nation. Cold stuff. Won't get above 20 for the next two days. Cry.gif

Some of you northerners probably laugh at high temps that warm. Thats ok, you are the crazy ones. Biggrin.gif

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eubanks
Could someone help a newbie with the number and location of all the plugs to pull to drain our Monsoon? Also, the best way and which hoses to disconnect?

Sounds like you are getting ready for the same weather we are up here in the Sooner Nation. Cold stuff. Won't get above 20 for the next two days. Cry.gif

Some of you northerners probably laugh at high temps that warm. Thats ok, you are the crazy ones. Biggrin.gif

Yep...supposed to be VERY cold here tomorrow and possible sleet and/or snow. It was pushing 80 last Saturday!!! Texas weather is crazy weird.

Thanks all for the comments. We may just drop a light in the engine compartment. We keep our i/o in these same storage units for 8 years without ever winterizing and we never had a problem...and I would think that outdrives are even more susceptible to freezing that inboard engines. :unsure:

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Lakenut

It only takes a few minutes to drain. I would for peice of mind.

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Baddog
Better safe than sorry.  My policy is to remove all hoses that you can and THEN blow copious amounts of compressed air thrugh eveything to insure all is dry.

uh oh...I feel a spirited, albeit misguided, grammar lesson coming on from our friend at Tuscarora...

Did it on purpose to see if anyone would bite. Time to reel in.

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mlange

Yeah, I feel just awful for all you guys down in Texas and your "crazy" weather. :)

Let's just say it was definitely not around 80 up here last weekend.

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jmack
jmack - we had a post going on this not long ago, but to make a long story short you don't need to wait for the stat to open.  The block will fill with the stat closed.  The stat keeps water from exiting the block, not entering.  I'm not sure where you are but -5 won't cut it here.  If you are using the pink antifreeze, some of us can't do what you do.  You do not want to dilute the pink stuff. So if the engine is full of water, it must be drained before pulling in the a/f, or it will be diluted. That's where everyone gets hung up - the fear that the stat closes in the time it takes to drain everything.  But it's a moot point.  But at least you measured what you drained out and if -5 is good in your region, then you should be ok.

If the water (or air) that's in the block can't exit, then the antifreeze can't enter. I would think the thermostat has to be open and water flowing through so that this procedure will work properly.

Also, I didn't use the pink RV antifreeze, I used regular antifreeze / coolant. I realize that the antifreeze in the block was diluted, but if you need protection to colder temps, just use a couple more gallons of antifreeze. If you used enough, you could fill the system with pure antifreeze / coolant as the water is pumped out to achieve the protection that you need.

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VinRLX
Better safe than sorry.  My policy is to remove all hoses that you can and THEN blow copious amounts of compressed air thrugh eveything to insure all is dry.

uh oh...I feel a spirited, albeit misguided, grammar lesson coming on from our friend at Tuscarora...

Did it on purpose to see if anyone would bite. Time to reel in.

Copious amounts of compressed air is, like, two tank-fulls AND all Hank's hot air. And who are you calling misguided, Yahoo?

I'd give you all the "copious amounts" lesson again, but that would be redundant. Not to mention I'd be repeating myself.

:)

As for the antifreeze, not sure I'm up for the toxicity debate tonight. . .

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HRemington

sounds like you're suffering from copious amounts of attitude to me...

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vette-ski
If the water (or air) that's in the block can't exit, then the antifreeze can't enter. I would think the thermostat has to be open and water flowing through so that this procedure will work properly.

Using the drain the block - fill with antifreeze method that is more commonly used, the block would be full of air, and I'm pretty sure there is a tiny hole in the stat body that acts as a bleeder to release the air. Also if you pour in the a/f you have to open up a line somewhere and that will vent out too.

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BarefootOz
 

Yeah, I feel just awful for all you guys down in Texas and your "crazy" weather.  :) 

 

Let's just say it was definitely not around 80 up here last weekend. 

 

mlange- ditto here, i'm looking out of my window right now it is all white, temp gauge reads 0 and my better half told me when she ran to the store this am she saw the lake began to freeze... Cry.gif

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Malibudude
Pics of the different locations would be great if anyone has them.

Joe

Joe,

No need for you to winterize like our friends in the frigid north.

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BarefootOz
 

Also, I didn't use the pink RV antifreeze, I used regular antifreeze / coolant. I realize that the antifreeze in the block was diluted, but if you need protection to colder temps, just use a couple more gallons of antifreeze. If you used enough, you could fill the system with pure antifreeze / coolant as the water is pumped out to achieve the protection that you need. 

 

jmack- the suggestions from stusumm and vette-ski are good ones, it will assured you the block and hoses are emptied out of water and the complete system will get filled up with anti-freeze. since you used regular anti-freeze don't forget to retrieve it before you put the boat back in the water... :)

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