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U.S. Coast Guard safty exemption question?


Capt. Moe

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I heard that Malibu has a Coast Guard safty exemptions. I did a little research and found this:

Exemption Notice

This boat complies with U.S. Coast Guard safety standards in effect on the date of

certification with the exception of certain fuel systems requirements associated with its

fuel injected engine as authorized by U.S. Coast Guard Grant of Exemption (CGB-06-

005). Maintenance of the fuel system in this boat should be performed only by Malibu

trained certified technicians using identical fuel systems components.

This came out of a 2011 Malibu owners manual.

What does this mean?

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I heard that Malibu has a Coast Guard safty exemptions. I did a little research and found this:

Exemption Notice

This boat complies with U.S. Coast Guard safety standards in effect on the date of

certification with the exception of certain fuel systems requirements associated with its

fuel injected engine as authorized by U.S. Coast Guard Grant of Exemption (CGB-06-

005). Maintenance of the fuel system in this boat should be performed only by Malibu

trained certified technicians using identical fuel systems components.

This came out of a 2011 Malibu owners manual.

What does this mean?

it means you will have to sell your boat at a huge loss....pm me.

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Looks like someone took a stab at an answer at the other place you made the same post...Here

Anyway, if this were an issue, it would be with Indmar, and would be common to Mastercraft and Malibu. Don't they both get their engines from Indmar? I know they used to.

Here's what 'Karl' from WW had to say....

"Indmar and some others use a high-pressure fuel supply system. USCG regs were written when only low pressure systems were used and specified. The exemption allows for the newer technology to be used. The main benefit is a reduction in vapor lock and the fuel pump being electric and in the tank instead of haning off of the engine block. Newer FI systems need the higher pressure to work. "

Sounds like a reasonable enough explanation to me...probably not anything scandalous.

Edited by RTS
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Don't you think that the USCG would approve the latest technology then? If it is so great why is MasterCraft boats saying don't let you tank go under 1/4 tank. Not covered under warranty if the pumps go out under 1/4 tank?

Allowing the fuel level in the fuel tank to fall below one-quarter of a

tank full may affect the reliability of the fuel pump or result in damage to

the fuel pump, which is not covered under warranty. (Pages 5-6, 7-1)

This was pulled out of the 2010 owners manual.

Indmar does not supply Malibu and MasterCraft with the fuel pumps. The warranty issues would be with the manufacturers. Fine Print Everywhere!

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Don't you think that the USCG would approve the latest technology then? If it is so great why is MasterCraft boats saying don't let you tank go under 1/4 tank. Not covered under warranty if the pumps go out under 1/4 tank?

Allowing the fuel level in the fuel tank to fall below one-quarter of a

tank full may affect the reliability of the fuel pump or result in damage to

the fuel pump, which is not covered under warranty. (Pages 5-6, 7-1)

This was pulled out of the 2010 owners manual.

Indmar does not supply Malibu and MasterCraft with the fuel pumps. The warranty issues would be with the manufacturers. Fine Print Everywhere!

Not the owners manual I copied the below from:

from page 5-6:

MasterCraft recommends that operators do not run the boat

below a quarter of a tank, except as necessary to return to shore,

and not until the boat has been operated enough times to develop

an understanding of how the fuel gauge readings relate to the visual

inspection of fuel left in the tank. Extending fuel usage beyond the

known capability of the boat may cause the boat to run out of fuel and

may leave you stranded off-shore.

Although it may be possible to see fuel in the bottom of the fuel

tank, you still may not be able to operate the boat. The fuel pick-up

system was designed to avoid introducing the small amount of water

and debris that unavoidably accumulate in the bottom of the tank.

Rather than relying on visual inspection, you should pay attention to

the fuel gauge.

Further, it is not recommended to allow the fuel to fall below

one-quarter of a tank full at any time as it may result in damage to the

fueling system.

7-1 says: The

pump system in your boat was specifically designed for the marine

environment and contains a number of added safety components that

are unique to the marine environment. Because of the special nature

of the design, there are no user-serviceable parts. Any parts in need

of service or maintenance will need to be addressed by an authorized

MasterCraft dealer. The authorized MasterCraft dealer there is

equipped with the special tools necessary to disassemble and service

the fuel capsule and associated parts. Replacement parts must

meet OEM requirements as specified by MasterCraft.

Mastercraft doesn't quite use the words you did, nor, for that matter does Mastercraft even use Indmar anymore. Enjoy your PCM nauti4life. :biggrin:

Edited by 85 Barefoot
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Barefoot-

You can find it here:http://www.mastercraft.com/files/manuals/b904483ae2bb799d4fe0b315f00aa764.pdf

4th paragraph down on the left of page V.

I love my PCM but looking at all the other options out there.

My question was about the USCG exemption Barefoot. Do you have an answer there?

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Considering the Coast Guard granted the exception, documented it, and gave a specific number, I'd say everything is ok.

-Chris

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Barefoot-

You can find it here:http://www.mastercraft.com/files/manuals/b904483ae2bb799d4fe0b315f00aa764.pdf

4th paragraph down on the left of page V.

I love my PCM but looking at all the other options out there.

My question was about the USCG exemption Barefoot. Do you have an answer there?

I bet. Would be nice info to tell your buyers that your competitor(s) says not to run past 1/4 tank. :lol:

What is your question? Why does more advanced and modern fuel delivery system require an exception? If that's in fact your question, I'd suggest asking the Coast Guard.

Edited by 85 Barefoot
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1/4 tank is so you don't run the pump dry with fuel sloshing in the tank, also these engines run a one line fuel system not a return system that most cars have and use the fuel to cool them, that is why they want the tank to have at least a 1/4 tank. your not supposed to run your car all the way down and no one tells you that either. running the tank low wont hurt anything but your fuel pump and then it just causes it to fail sooner

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1/4 tank is so you don't run the pump dry with fuel sloshing in the tank, also these engines run a one line fuel system not a return system that most cars have and use the fuel to cool them, that is why they want the tank to have at least a 1/4 tank. your not supposed to run your car all the way down and no one tells you that either. running the tank low wont hurt anything but your fuel pump and then it just causes it to fail sooner

Exactly, its about $675 to replace a fuel pump in the tank of a Chevrolet suburban, if you run around below 1/4 tank, the fuel pump is no longer submerged in gasoline and runs hotter burning out quicker.

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Gee Whizz,

For the past 10 yrs. I've been draining the tank in my boat by letting it run all the way to empty. No problems to date.

Now that I think about it, I've been doing the same thing with my Ducati. And, we all know how problematic Itailan things are. :dontknow:

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Gee Whizz,

For the past 10 yrs. I've been draining the tank in my boat by letting it run all the way to empty. No problems to date.

Now that I think about it, I've been doing the same thing with my Ducati. And, we all know how problematic Itailan things are. :dontknow:

Your bu does not have an in-tank fuel pump like the newer boats does it?

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No,

But, my Duc does.

I thought the whole issue was that the fuel cooled the pump? :dontknow:

I let my pump run until it's dry in both applications.

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