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pics of my new flag


dlll

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took some shots of the new flag system i put on they work great just a flip of the lever and it goes up just pull it down to reload flag. clamps on the bimini top or the tower. you can mount them forward or backward. leave them on the bimini while it's up or off just set it and forget it P1010332.jpgP1010330.jpgP1010338.jpgP1010341.jpg

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Edited by dlll
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Hey guys I've seen a few of these flag holsters etc. What are they for? I'm in Canada and I'm guessing we don't have this law. Or I've just never had to worry about it because of the lake we're on.

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a orange flag is to be displayed to let other boaters know someone is in the water it is the law here and carries a fine of $200 if caught with no flag. this is not a flag holder the flag is in side the tube and extends when you flip the lever. To retract it all you have to do is pull down to reload. I have both so i can flip it or my spotter can flip it from the passenger side. this means the spotter can be hands free to help with the rope or skis. The law says a flag must only be displayed not necessary held.

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a orange flag is to be displayed to let other boaters know someone is in the water it is the law here and carries a fine of $200 if caught with no flag. this is not a flag holder the flag is in side the tube and extends when you flip the lever. To retract it all you have to do is pull down to reload. I have both so i can flip it or my spotter can flip it from the passenger side. this means the spotter can be hands free to help with the rope or skis. The law says a flag must only be displayed not necessary held.

Thanks. Good to know if I'm ever riding in the states. Bound to happen sooner or later. (Who's going to invite me?Whistling.gif )

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well i know California, Nevada, Arizona ,Utah, Idaho, Florida some parts other states i don't know some states require all the time someone is in the water. This just makes good since you have a person down 100-150 ft back and some dummy @$#@ CANT SEE THEM but if that flag is up it make them aware someone is in the water. here is link to find which state require a flag also if you take an online training course you may get a reduction on your insurance to .http://www.boatus.org/onlinecourse/

Edited by dlll
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their is a flip lever at the end of the tube it has a spring inside and the spring pushes a plunger up go to

www.handsfreeflag.com and they will give club members 10% off thats $110.00 dollars includes shipping just tell them you want the malibu crew special in the order form. or pm me your ph# and i will give it him he is going to set a link up on his site for member discount or may be Bu site could do a group buy which i told him about he was good with that just would like to know if their is any interest in it here

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well i know California, Nevada, Arizona ,Utah, Idaho, Florida some parts other states i don't know some states require all the time someone is in the water. This just makes good since you have a person down 100-150 ft back and some dummy @$#@ CANT SEE THEM but if that flag is up it make them aware someone is in the water. here is link to find which state require a flag also if you take an online training course you may get a reduction on your insurance to .http://www.boatus.org/onlinecourse/

I live in Florida and I've never heard of a law like that. I've never seen anyone with flags either. Maybe its one of those laws that is not enforced?

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Wow I live in Oregon its law. I just assumed it was law everywhere. Good to know cause hold up a flag in the wrong state and the other boaters are likely to come to you to see if you need aid.... :crazy:

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Wow I live in Oregon its law. I just assumed it was law everywhere. Good to know cause hold up a flag in the wrong state and the other boaters are likely to come to you to see if you need aid.... :crazy:

There's nothing wrong with that either, based on other recent topics, it's good to hear about good samaritans, I try to be one every chance I get.

It's not law everywhere but I think it's a good one. You won't be punished for doing it even it's not the law, I think I'm gonna pick up a flag next time I'm at a boating store. We have a lot a jet skiers where I boat :whistling:

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In Cali., technically, you are required to assist a boat in distress.

Most people just crank the tunes and crack open a cold one while they drive past you wondering why you're waving your arms. No one wants to spend an hour plus towing in some dufus.

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In Cali., technically, you are required to assist a boat in distress.

Most people just crank the tunes and crack open a cold one while they drive past you wondering why you're waving your arms. No one wants to spend an hour plus towing in some dufus.

i know this might sound dumb for some of you but i carry a battery jump box and 1 gal of gas in a baby jeep can i got from the army surplus. like you said some people just drive by, i have seen it before, It is always in the back of my mind that i might get stuck out in a back cove and you might not even see anyone ever. I also have a cell phone with the marinas number on speed dial and a vhf hand radio so i can call up my houseboat or the marina. No i am not a worry wart but i have seen alot of stupid things and some nasty accidents and time is away a factor the quicker you can get help on the way the better :rockon:

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Wow I live in Oregon its law. I just assumed it was law everywhere. Good to know cause hold up a flag in the wrong state and the other boaters are likely to come to you to see if you need aid.... Crazy.gif

I don't think we have the flag law here in Ontario either. But I think everyone knows the signal for help is frantically waviong paddles in the air!Crazy.gif Because really what are two paddles going to do on a 4000 lb boat? They come with V8's for a reason.

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I don't think we have this law here in Illinois. I have never seen a boat with this flag on it, and doubt many here in Illinois would know what it meant. The problem I see is if I start using one, people that didn't know what it meant would be looking at the flag rather than for a downed skier in the water. Granted we're on a busy body of water...Chain-O-Lakes, but we always assume all boaters will not see your downed skier. We get back to the skier and get between them and any other boat.

If everyone know what it meant, I would definately be on board with it, but for now, I would not like to confuse other boaters. There are enough destracted idiots out there.

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i know this might sound dumb for some of you but i carry a battery jump box and 1 gal of gas in a baby jeep can

I always carry a battery jumper, 5 gals. of gas, handheld VHF, 3 tools boxes, and first aid kit.

I thought the law was to display the flag when you have a downed rider. Are you supposed to display the flag while someone is riding as well?

Flag must be held up any time a skier is down in the water or there is a rope in the water. It's the first thing the cops will pop you for and then they get the chance to ask to see all your life vests and then that might turn into, "Sir, have you had anything to drink today?"

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we all know here in Ca it's the law and it is normal for to see and have flags. This is not for everyone. For me it's the convenience thing to not have to worry if the flag is up while my spotter is helping with the skis or rope ect. If the spotter just happens to put the flag down and ranger rick pops up then starts asking questions this could ruin the whole day.Plus is just nice bling for the boat to

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Washington has had the rule for a long time. Idaho also. Here is what the boaters handbook says:

The observer must observe the person(s) under tow continuously and display a skier-down flag whenever the person is in the water after falling or while preparing to ski. The flag must be displayed so that it is visible from all directions.

Skier-Down Flag

Washington law requires that vessels towing person(s) on water skis or similar devices carry and use a skier-down flag whenever the towed person(s) is preparing to ski or has fallen into the water.

Remote-operated personal watercraft (PWCs designed to be operated by a towed person) must have a skier-down flag attached to the PWC.

Skier-Down Flag: A brilliant orange or bright red flag at least 12 x 12 inches and mounted on a pole at least 24 inches long

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took some shots of the new flag system i put on they work great just a flip of the lever and it goes up just pull it down to reload flag. clamps on the bimini top or the tower. you can mount them forward or backward. leave them on the bimini while it's up or off just set it and forget it P1010332.jpgP1010330.jpgP1010338.jpgP1010341.jpg

I'm in Nevada and this is our local laws:

It's the Law: Specifically for Skiing

Vessel operators towing a person(s) on water skis, a surfboard, or any other device have additional laws.

Requirements for Towing Skiers

A person operating a vessel that is towing a person on water skis, a surfboard, or any other device must be:

At least 14 years of age or ...

At least 12 years of age and have on board a person at least 21 years of age in a position to supervise the operator.

All persons being towed behind a vessel on water skis, a surfboard, or other device must wear a USCG-approved personal flotation device (life jacket).

Every vessel towing a person(s) on water skis, a surfboard, or other device must have on board, in addition to the vessel operator, an observer who is:

At least 12 years of age or ...

At least 10 years of age and another passenger who is at least 21 years of age.

The observer must display the skier-down flag (12"X12" in size) whenever the towed person(s) is in the water preparing to be towed or waiting to be picked up by the towing vessel.

It is illegal for vessels to tow persons on water skis, a surfboard, or any other device between sunset and sunrise.

If towing a person on water skis or other device, the vessel must be rated to carry at least three people.

Some waters have local regulations that limit or prohibit water-skiing.

Remember—teak surfing is against the law in Nevada.

Aside from the obvious danger of propeller injury, the surfer is also in danger of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Avoiding Propeller Strike Injuries

Most propeller strike accidents result from operator error. Victims include swimmers, scuba divers, fallen water-skiers, and boat operators or passengers. Most propeller accidents can be prevented by following basic safe boating practices.

Maintain a proper lookout. The primary cause of propeller strike accidents is operator inattention.

Make sure the engine is off so that the propeller is not rotating when passengers are boarding or leaving a boat.

Never start a boat with the engine in gear.

Slow down when approaching congested areas and anchorages. In congested areas, always be alert for swimmers and divers.

Learn to recognize warning buoys that mark swimming and other hazardous areas.

Keep the boat away from marked swimming and diving areas. Become familiar with the red and white or blue and white diver-down flags signaling that divers are below the surface.

Make sure that passengers are seated properly before getting underway. Some operators of larger boats with several passengers have caused injuries by putting the engine in gear while people were still swimming or diving from the boat.

Never ride on a seat back, gunwale, transom, or bow.

Devices that Reduce Propeller Strikes

There are several new technologies designed to reduce propeller strikes. The effectiveness of the devices varies, depending on the boat and the operating environment. For more information, read the article “Propeller Injury Intervention” on the U.S. Coast Guard’s Boating Safety website.

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