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shawndoggy

While we're talking about tires...

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shawndoggy

What tire pressure should I be running? I've seen people saying 50lbs, others saying use the sidewall number, etc. and like that. Thoughts?

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Molarbu

I run 50 lbs.

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DIE2SURF

I think it would also depend on single or double axle trailer. With double axle, tires shouldn't need as much as 50psi IMHO. Can be a pretty rough ride for the 'bu. Also, weight of the boat would be a factor.

Edited by DIE2SURF

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MizzouMike

My sidewall says 65. I run arond 60 with my single axle trailer.

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bigD

Whatever it shows on the side wall is what I would run.

My OEM Bias plys where around 35psi my radials are 65psi

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thethrillofspeed

I actually find the trailer sticker useful as opposed to most of the warning stickers they plaster all over everything. I leave that sicker on the trailer and fill my tires according to that sticker. On my tandem axle Extreme trailer it says 50 psi cold, so that is what I fill my trailer tires to.

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Bill_AirJunky

I filled mine to what it said on the trailer. Then watched how the tires wore & dropped it to 45 psi.

But I have car tires on mine too. Not sure if that makes any difference or not.

Tandem axle.

Edited by Bill_AirJunky

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davemac

single axle, radials here. Just put new tires on yesterday. Sidewall says (max cold pressure 65 psi). I'll probably run them around 60 psi.

My last tires were 55psi I believe.

If I'm ever pulling the trailer a substantial distance (without the boat on it), I drop the pressure a bit to reduce the trailer "bouncing".

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Malibudude

Run what the tire specifies in my case 44psi.

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Ndawg12

Run what the tire specifies in my case 44psi.

I don't know about that. I went around and filled all my trailer tires to 65 per mfg specs and it looked like only the center 2 inches of the tire was hitting the road. Did the same on my truck, 50 psi and the shoulders of the tires didn't come close to touching the road, made the steering all squirly, and a rough ride. I can't see the tire wearing properly at those psi's. I droppoed the psi on them all until the entire base of the tires were contacting the road and then a little more to account for when they heat up...jm2c.

Edited by Ndawg12

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bennekm

I think it would also depend on single or double axle trailer. With double axle, tires shouldn't need as much as 50psi IMHO. Can be a pretty rough ride for the 'bu. Also, weight of the boat would be a factor.

I agree...I under-inflate mine...never over 40. You're tires are the suspension for your trailer. But if I was going on a long highway trip at high speeds, I bring them close to recommended pressure.

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Laycon Row

Something I learned on this site - If you are running Goodyear Marathons, you should add 10 psi to the max load amount if you want to tow over 66 MPH. See attached.

Goodyear Marathon Bulletin

Quote:

· Industry standards dictate that tires with the ST designation are speed restricted to 65 MPH under normal

inflation and load conditions unless a different speed restriction is indicated on the sidewall of the tire.

· Based on industry standards, if tires with the ST designation are used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph, it is

necessary to increase the cold inflation pressures by 10 psi above the recommended pressure for the load.

o Do not exceed the maximum pressure for the wheel.

o If the maximum pressure for the wheel prohibits the increase of air pressure, then the

maximum speed must be restricted to 65 mph.

o The cold inflation pressure must not exceed 10 psi beyond the inflation specified for the

maximum load of the tire.

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wienrdog

A lot of it will depends on the tires, Single Axle vs Dbl Axle, Auto Tires vs Trailer tires, weight of boat, etc.

Trailer tire load range C should be 50.

Trailer tire load range D should be 65.

Below that pressure, and you'll typically be increasing the rolling resistance & wear on outer edges of tires.

I run load range D on my SA trailer & get a good contact patch @ 65PSI. (I have about 2K per tire when loaded for the lake.) I also get 1.4 MPG more than running load range C & can feel the difference in how the boat tows.

You trailer is different than your car.

For your car, you should be using the pressure indicated on the tire placard in the car, not the max pressure on the sidewall.

ND - In your case with a DA trailer & relatively light V-Ride - it's a bit unusual that you'd have load range D's on it. You'd be closer to 1200 lbs/tire.

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Ndawg12

A lot of it will depends on the tires, Single Axle vs Dbl Axle, Auto Tires vs Trailer tires, weight of boat, etc.

Trailer tire load range C should be 50.

Trailer tire load range D should be 65.

Below that pressure, and you'll typically be increasing the rolling resistance & wear on outer edges of tires.

I run load range D on my SA trailer & get a good contact patch @ 65PSI. (I have about 2K per tire when loaded for the lake.) I also get 1.4 MPG more than running load range C & can feel the difference in how the boat tows.

You trailer is different than your car.

For your car, you should be using the pressure indicated on the tire placard in the car, not the max pressure on the sidewall.

ND - In your case with a DA trailer & relatively light V-Ride - it's a bit unusual that you'd have load range D's on it. You'd be closer to 1200 lbs/tire.

Once again I must reiterate the fact that I have no problem admitting my many mistakes which is why I ask more questions than I try to answer :whistle: And maybe that's why they looked like balloons at 65 psi :lol:

post-8316-127188176599_thumb.jpg

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Ndawg12

A lot of it will depends on the tires, Single Axle vs Dbl Axle, Auto Tires vs Trailer tires, weight of boat, etc.

Trailer tire load range C should be 50.

Trailer tire load range D should be 65.

Below that pressure, and you'll typically be increasing the rolling resistance & wear on outer edges of tires.

I run load range D on my SA trailer & get a good contact patch @ 65PSI. (I have about 2K per tire when loaded for the lake.) I also get 1.4 MPG more than running load range C & can feel the difference in how the boat tows.

You trailer is different than your car.

For your car, you should be using the pressure indicated on the tire placard in the car, not the max pressure on the sidewall.

ND - In your case with a DA trailer & relatively light V-Ride - it's a bit unusual that you'd have load range D's on it. You'd be closer to 1200 lbs/tire.

Ha! Maybe this is why they look balloons at 65psi!! Good info WD.

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Ndawg12

A lot of it will depends on the tires, Single Axle vs Dbl Axle, Auto Tires vs Trailer tires, weight of boat, etc.

Trailer tire load range C should be 50.

Trailer tire load range D should be 65.

Below that pressure, and you'll typically be increasing the rolling resistance & wear on outer edges of tires.

I run load range D on my SA trailer & get a good contact patch @ 65PSI. (I have about 2K per tire when loaded for the lake.) I also get 1.4 MPG more than running load range C & can feel the difference in how the boat tows.

You trailer is different than your car.

For your car, you should be using the pressure indicated on the tire placard in the car, not the max pressure on the sidewall.

ND - In your case with a DA trailer & relatively light V-Ride - it's a bit unusual that you'd have load range D's on it. You'd be closer to 1200 lbs/tire.

Ha! Maybe this is why they looked like balloons at 65psi!! Good info WD.

post-8316-127188199105_thumb.jpg

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WakingMeHappy

My sidewalls state not to inflate greater than 35 PSI. So I put them at 35 PSI. My tire wear at that pressure is even all the way around.

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mainekneeboarder

I actually find the trailer sticker useful as opposed to most of the warning stickers they plaster all over everything. I leave that sicker on the trailer and fill my tires according to that sticker. On my tandem axle Extreme trailer it says 50 psi cold, so that is what I fill my trailer tires to.

Anyone checking/filling there tires should look at the sidewall of the tire for a MAX PSI rating, you don't want to take someones advice or read a sticker and start filling a tire to 50-60 PSI that is rated for 35 PSI!! All tires are different and if the tires are not the same that came on the trailer you may be getting into some danger! The tire has a MAX PSI for a reason, it also states the MAX load at that PSI. Most better brand tires carry a max load at a lower PSI then a cheaper brand tire will. If your tire has, say a MAX load of 2000 LB at 35 PSI and the tires that were originally on the trailer had a max load of 2000 LB at 60 PSI, then you wouldn't want to be inflating the new tires to the 60 PSI that the trailer says. Its obviously going to put the tire at risk of blowing out, plus ride very rough. Same goes true the other way. If your trailer came with a tire that was rated at 2000 LB at 60 PSI and they got replaced with a tire that has a load rating of 2500 LB at 60 PSI, then obviously its going to ride different and wear faster at That 60 PSI. The best way to do it is look at the side wall LB rating and PSI, If it is a heavy tire that is load rated of 2500-3000 LBS, your going to have to run it a bit lower on PSI, most boats weigh about 3500-4000 LBS then the trailer of about 1000-1500 LBS equals 4500-5500 LBS. Four tires rated at 2500 LBS each at 60 PSI = 10,000 LBS, obviously the tire at its recommended PSI is going to were prematurely and ride rough. Always look at the side wall of the tire, especially if running car tires on a trailer!

PS, numbers are just even numbers to make it easy!

Edited by mainekneeboarder

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nevertwobig

You can't go by the numbers on the sidewall. What you need to do is take an accurate measurement of the tread with, than what you need to do is drive over a piece of carbon paper or a piece of plywood with wet spray paint and check the tread pattern. If it is too wide, than you need to increase the air pressure. If too narrow, let some air out. You want to use the whole tread width. You will find out that your tires will wear alot better, and if you have tandem axles, you will have less cupping. This is what I do on my camper. I was having problems with cupping and the tire dealer said this is the proper way to check. They make a guage to drive over, but if ytou are creative, you can save a few bucks. Hope this helps.

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Lance B. Johnson

I believe in K.I.S.S

buy trailer tires that have a higher pressure rating than listed on the trailer, and then inflate them to the pressure listed on the trailer.

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