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Helinut

Anti Siphons

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Helinut

Heya,

I need to pick up a couple of anti siphons for my ballast. I was finally able to figure out last year that I was losing my water back through the fill pump. I put 750's in and I guess the pressure is a bit too much. To stop them from draining I would just close the valves. I'd rather not do that anymore.

Anyone know of some decent anti siphon's that won't kill the flow too much?

Thanks

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Bobby Light

These guys have them, but i have no experience with this product.

http://www.wakemakers.com/wakeboard-ballast-parts

actually Bakes, right there in WA has them as well.

http://www.bakesonline.com/detail.aspx?ID=1616

I think the wording in the bakes ad should say "particulate" instead of "particular".

Better try this like, your link was for the cap and duckbill stopper only.

Anti-siphon loop - http://www.bakesonline.com/detail.aspx?ID=994

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D-GOOSE

I'm using 1" hose and pick my parts up at Homedepot.

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tvzzz

Has anyone tried to make their own with a T and a check valve????

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Chia

Has anyone tried to make their own with a T and a check valve????

what kind of check valve?

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tvzzz

what kind of check valve?

Wouldn't you get the same effect with a one way check valve? It would let air in when the line tried to siphon and close while pumping. The location would still need to be the same as a loop.

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Brad B

I use a 1" Brady check valve instead(SLC-100). That way I don't need to run extra hose up to make the loop - just go directly to fill point.

I put the check valve right after the pump.

And it helps keep the pump primed.

Plus they cost less at $9 than the anti-syphon plus the $$ saved on hose/tubing.

And just a plain cleaner look and setup.

Edited by Brad B

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Tao of Wake

I use a 1" Brady check valve instead(SLC-100). That way I don't need to run extra hose up to make the loop - just go directly to fill point.

I put the check valve right after the pump.

And it helps keep the pump primed.

Plus they cost less at $9 than the anti-syphon plus the $ saved on hose/tubing.

And just a plain cleaner look and setup.

I'll second the check valve setup. Just before the thru hull, I have a tee with a check valve on both inlets. The inlets come from the drain pump and the vent. The tee and check valves are zip tied under the gunnel in the compartment where the sac is located. This has worked great. I tried the anti-siphons, and because I couldn't get them high enough, water would still drain out. Once I installed the check valves, I have no draining at all.

Just as a side note, I also added a check valve in the fill line so that it does not drain back out the fill pump. Now, when I empty the sac, it is COMPLETELY empty because there is a check valve on all three ports. It actually pinches all up because the air is drawn out by the pump and no air can get back into the bag. Then when I fill it up again, it doesn't even have to vent. I have been thinking of removing the vent line because of this. When the sac is full, the overflow will just go out the drain line, so the vent line is only to get the air out of the sac.

BTW, I used these "Smart" check valves to get the least amount of restriction. They are a bit more expensive, but I think these cause less restriction than a typical check valve that redirects the water around the valve.

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Brad B

About removing the vent line or blocking the vent line-

Last year we accidently hit the fill pumps and they stayed on too long while the drain and vent hoses were shut off via ball valves.

The enzo sac exploded.

I'll keep shut offs on my drains but no longer on the vents.

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NvBoarder

I put a shut off valve on my front ballast tank drain line, which helped significantly. Once the tank is full I close the valve which is nothing more than a sprinkler in line valve and some hose clamps. You have to do it manually but it does work and can be found at Home Depot.

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Chia

I put a shut off valve on my front ballast tank drain line, which helped significantly. Once the tank is full I close the valve which is nothing more than a sprinkler in line valve and some hose clamps. You have to do it manually but it does work and can be found at Home Depot.

This topic was started by the OP because he doesn't want to do that anymore.

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tvzzz

Isn't that the whole point of the vented loop? Route the hose from the pump, up to a vented loop(above water level), then down to the fill of the sack to eliminate the need to close a valve between the pump and the sac due to siphoning? I was only thinking that if you could make your own vented loop with a T and a check valve you could save some dough and use whatever fittings you wanted.

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Brad B

Isn't that the whole point of the vented loop? Route the hose from the pump, up to a vented loop(above water level), then down to the fill of the sack to eliminate the need to close a valve between the pump and the sac due to siphoning? I was only thinking that if you could make your own vented loop with a T and a check valve you could save some dough and use whatever fittings you wanted.

Using a check valve does this job automatically and uses way less hose/tubing - can go directly to the fill spot without looping and such.

This also makes a much "cleaner" looking install - well and its cheaper.

Plumbed in ballast by its nature has hoses going every which a way so if you can save a few feet it can only help

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Ndawg12

Using a check valve does this job automatically and uses way less hose/tubing - can go directly to the fill spot without looping and such.

This also makes a much "cleaner" looking install - well and its cheaper.

Plumbed in ballast by its nature has hoses going every which a way so if you can save a few feet it can only help

I have a similar question as the OP, I'm going to put 400's in the rear locker and I'm worried about auto draining back through the fill. Seems like a simple check valve anywhere in the fill line (like Brad B stated a couple times) would remedy this, here's what I'm thinking about using from Lowe's probably about $7 each

lowes 3/4" check valve

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Chia

I have a similar question as the OP, I'm going to put 400's in the rear locker and I'm worried about auto draining back through the fill. Seems like a simple check valve anywhere in the fill line (like Brad B stated a couple times) would remedy this, here's what I'm thinking about using from Lowe's probably about $7 each

lowes 3/4" check valve

i wonder why they don't do that with factory installs, it appears to be less expensive?

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Brad B

I don't know about Lowes but Home Depot used to carry the 3/4" Brady check valve - its threaded so all you need to add is a couple of 3/4 to barb fittings on either end

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OLDGUY

I don't know about Lowes but Home Depot used to carry the 3/4" Brady check valve - its threaded so all you need to add is a couple of 3/4 to barb fittings on either end

[/quote

What pumps are you using? Problem with the check valves is the water pressure that it takes to open them.

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Brad B

I started using the stock Rule 700s and they had no problem opening the Brady 3/4" check valves.

But I have upgraded to Tsunami 1200s and 1" hose so now 1" valves.

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Ndawg12

I don't know about Lowes but Home Depot used to carry the 3/4" Brady check valve - its threaded so all you need to add is a couple of 3/4 to barb fittings on either end

[/quote

What pumps are you using? Problem with the check valves is the water pressure that it takes to open them.

The valves I've seen open at any where from 1/2 to 2 psi. I'm running the stock 800gpm pumps, I've heard of them being left on and bursting bags that weren't properly vented so I'm thinking that they are strong enough to open even a 2 psi check valve. Dontknow.gif

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Chia

ame='OLDGUY' date='January 16, 2010 - 03:39 PM' timestamp='1263674358' post='359383']

The valves I've seen open at any where from 1/2 to 2 psi. I'm running the stock 800gpm pumps, I've heard of them being left on and bursting bags that weren't properly vented so I'm thinking that they are strong enough to open even a 2 psi check valve. Dontknow.gif

unless they were poorly constructed bags, i doubt that an aerator pump will burst a fat sac. They are designed for volume not pressure. Even filling a bag from the bottom instead of from the top will take a lot longer. Not sure about the 2psi valve though.

Now if they could put another impeller off the motor for use with fat sacs, then you would want to be sure to have an overflow/vent. (why hasn't someone done that yet?)

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Bobby Light

I have a similar question as the OP, I'm going to put 400's in the rear locker and I'm worried about auto draining back through the fill. Seems like a simple check valve anywhere in the fill line (like Brad B stated a couple times) would remedy this, here's what I'm thinking about using from Lowe's probably about $7 each

lowes 3/4" check valve

Those have to seriously restrict flow?

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Brad B

I expected restriction issues when I first tried them but had none.

The biggest sac I fill is a 750 and it fills pretty quick - never actually timed it but it seems fine.

Put the check valve right after the pump and then run the hose to the sac.

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Brad B

unless they were poorly constructed bags, i doubt that an aerator pump will burst a fat sac. They are designed for volume not pressure. Even filling a bag from the bottom instead of from the top will take a lot longer. Not sure about the 2psi valve though.

Now if they could put another impeller off the motor for use with fat sacs, then you would want to be sure to have an overflow/vent. (why hasn't someone done that yet?)

Just at the end of last summer we busted a port side Enzo sac by accidently leaving the pumps on.

It had 2 Tsunami pumps filling it.

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