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sixtydriver

To Fog or Not to Fog

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sixtydriver
:unsure::unsure: Alright guys and gals...I winterize my 01 Response LX engine (Monsoon II) and I fogged the cylinders individually. I now have read that this is a No-No in the winterization .pdf. What is the real consensus? To fog or not? I sprayed fogging oil into each spark plug hole for about 3 seconds and bumped the engine a couple times and then placed the spark plugs back in. Anything I need to do before first start of the season because I did this...anti-vapor lock procedure? A friend with a Supra has done this forever with no ill effects?

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Pistol Pete

You're fine.

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sixtydriver

You're fine.

Thanks Pete...good deal. Some swear by it...some don't.

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Pistol Pete

The important thing is that you rolled the engine a few times with the plugs out. This will guarantee no hydro static lock.

edit for everyone else reading this, the other really important thing is this engine does not have 02 sensors or cats.

Edited by Pistol Pete

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Baddog

Do it every year with no issues, but concur on the boats with cats = No-No.

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Chia

The important thing is that you rolled the engine a few times with the plugs out. This will guarantee no hydro static lock.

edit for everyone else reading this, the other really important thing is this engine does not have 02 sensors or cats.

Do it every year with no issues, but concur on the boats with cats = No-No.

Actually, his procedure of fogging the cylinders thru the spark plug hole is the correct procedure for fogging an engine with cats.

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sixtydriver

Actually, his procedure of fogging the cylinders thru the spark plug hole is the correct procedure for fogging an engine with cats.

Thanks all...I was just looking at page 4 of this section...and VLX04 asked the "same exact question" and there is some additional great information on fogging Rockon.gif for those of us who winterize...I appreciate all the help and will continue to fog both the throttle body intake and the individual cylinders..can't wait to get er back out...now I can tackle winter projects!

Edited by sixtydriver

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VLX04

Thanks all...I was just looking at page 4 of this section...and VLX04 asked the "same exact question" and there is some additional great information on fogging Rockon.gif for those of us who winterize...I appreciate all the help and will continue to fog both the throttle body intake and the individual cylinders..can't wait to get er back out...now I can tackle winter projects!

I have always foged in the past with my sanger, I think the point is to turn the engine over a few times and not to over fill the cylinders....I was a little concerned my self when I read some other post.. Like I said before I was doing this for the past 13 years and never had a problem.. over 850 Hr on the last boat.

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electricjohn

Been fogging the cylinders since 1963, albeit they were strickly two cycle engines up to 2003. Never had a problem.

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Baddog

Actually, his procedure of fogging the cylinders thru the spark plug hole is the correct procedure for fogging an engine with cats.

But won't that cause a cat issue in the spring on first start-up?

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Chia

But won't that cause a cat issue in the spring on first start-up?

It is the recommended procedure as per the Indmar manual, It is section 7, storage and winter layup, page 7-3. the manual can be found right here on our site in Resourses/DIY

Malibu Specifications

edit: i checked 2008

Edited by Cervelo

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Bake's Marine

But won't that cause a cat issue in the spring on first start-up?

Nope, what Indmar is concerned about is getting raw fogging oil on the catalyst and letting it sit all winter deteriorating the catalyst element. You can get oil on the catalyst as long as your planning on running the engine right after heating the catalyst burning off anything that gets on it.

Fogging the engine cylinders is very important if your planning on not using a engine for more than 1-2 months. I've had customers damage piston rings before and lose compression on a cylinder. I wouldn't skip this step on any engine.

-Paul

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Ndawg12

Nope, what Indmar is concerned about is getting raw fogging oil on the catalyst and letting it sit all winter deteriorating the catalyst element. You can get oil on the catalyst as long as your planning on running the engine right after heating the catalyst burning off anything that gets on it.

Fogging the engine cylinders is very important if your planning on not using a engine for more than 1-2 months. I've had customers damage piston rings before and lose compression on a cylinder. I wouldn't skip this step on any engine.

-Paul

Semi hi-jack: '06 340hp Monsoon - I pulled the air filter and sprayed fogging oil into the intake for about 15 seconds (boat was running of course) heard the motor cough, stumble, and recover and then I shut it down. Did I do it right?

Edited by Ndawg12

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Pistol Pete

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Pistol Pete

Nope, what Indmar is concerned about is getting raw fogging oil on the catalyst and letting it sit all winter deteriorating the catalyst element. You can get oil on the catalyst as long as your planning on running the engine right after heating the catalyst burning off anything that gets on it.

Fogging the engine cylinders is very important if your planning on not using a engine for more than 1-2 months. I've had customers damage piston rings before and lose compression on a cylinder. I wouldn't skip this step on any engine.

-Paul

What about post #4 here Paul? Dontknow.gif

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Chia

What about post #4 here Paul? Dontknow.gif

you mean this one: I think he is saying the same thing.

Pete,

If you don't mind, I wanted to add 2 cents about fogging the engine cylinders. I just read your .pdf and those directions are great and will work for most boats but Catalyst exhaust engines need to be handled different.

Since 2007, at Indmar and Malibu service school each year. We've been taught that if the engine has Catalyst exhaust, the engine CAN NOT be fogged thru the throttle body with the engine running like your instructions say. Raw oil on the catalyst can cause catastrophic failure to the catalyst and leave the owner with a headache of issues and or expenses.

The factoid stating that pulling the spark plugs and squirting fogging oil or any other substance can cause Hydraulic lock is partially true if it not done properly. A squirt for 3 seconds is more than plenty to coat the cylinder ring and protect it for seasonal storage and will not cause catastrophic damage. The goal in mind is to prevent piston rings from sticking from lack of lubrication from sitting over the winter or inactivity. The fogging oil is there to provide that lubrication at the first start up the following year.

I hope this info makes sense, i just don't want anybody to learn the hard way since I'm sure the Catalyst elements are really expensive and Indmar made it pretty clear at school that they do not want fogging oil to get on the catalyst and sit all winter.

-Paul

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Ndawg12

yeah, I was thinking the same thing, not sure what Pete was getting at....???

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Bake's Marine

Semi hi-jack: '06 340hp Monsoon - I pulled the air filter and sprayed fogging oil into the intake for about 15 seconds (boat was running of course) heard the motor cough, stumble, and recover and then I shut it down. Did I do it right?

Did you bring the RPM up to 1,000-1,200 RPM? You should be able to spray the fogging fluid down the intake with the engine running for about 30-45 seconds. On a EFI motor it won't usually cough but you will hear the intake start sucking more air.

For the most part sounds like your doing it right.

What about post #4 here Paul? Dontknow.gif

Sorry to confuse things.

NON-CATALYST EXHAUST MOTOR - OK to fog down the intake

CATALYST EXHAUST MOTOR - NOT OK to fog down the intake, bit it is OK to fog the cylinders individually. You have to pull the spark plugs individually and spray each cylinder because you can't get the raw fogging oil on the catalyst sitting all winter long. It doesn't matter when you start the engine in the spring because the catalyst well heat up enough where it will burn everything off.

Make sense?

-Paul

Edited by Bake's Marine

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Baddog

Did you bring the RPM up to 1,000-1,200 RPM? You should be able to spray the fogging fluid down the intake with the engine running for about 30-45 seconds. On a EFI motor it won't usually cough but you will hear the intake start sucking more air.

For the most part sounds like your doing it right.

Sorry to confuse things.

NON-CATALYST EXHAUST MOTOR - OK to fog down the intake

CATALYST EXHAUST MOTOR - NOT OK to fog down the intake, you have to pull plugs individually and spray each cylinder because you can't get the raw fogging oil on the catalyst sitting all winter long. It doesn't matter when you start the engine in the spring because the catalyst well heat up enough where it will burn everything off.

Make sense?

-Paul

Clear as the Boston harbor, now.

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BlastRlxi

Does anyone know if you pull the lanyard and crank the engine over for about 15 seconds (without starting), does that distribute enough oil so that you don't have to fog? (Assuming you did this once a month or so.)

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Marine Specialty

Does anyone know if you pull the lanyard and crank the engine over for about 15 seconds (without starting), does that distribute enough oil so that you don't have to fog? (Assuming you did this once a month or so.)

Engine oil does not work the same as fogging oil. Fogging oil has a substance it that allows it to stick to the internal parts of the engine. Regular oil does not it will all run back off as the motor sits. You would have to crank it every day.

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Bake's Marine

Does anyone know if you pull the lanyard and crank the engine over for about 15 seconds (without starting), does that distribute enough oil so that you don't have to fog? (Assuming you did this once a month or so.)

I think that would distribute oil (Cranking for 30 seconds +) but I don't think it will protect like fogging oil does (lubrication, corrosion, etc) Plus I think it would be much nicer to set it and forget it?

-Paul

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Marine Specialty

I think that would distribute oil (Cranking for 30 seconds +) but I don't think it will protect like fogging oil does (lubrication, corrosion, etc) Plus I think it would be much nicer to set it and forget it?

-Paul

Thumbup.gifYahoo.gif

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Baddog

Does anyone know if you pull the lanyard and crank the engine over for about 15 seconds (without starting), does that distribute enough oil so that you don't have to fog? (Assuming you did this once a month or so.)

You are fogging to protect the cylinder walls. Doing what you desribe will accomplish absolutley zero toward that objective. Unless you have really poor compression or a two stroke.

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BlastRlxi

I know what you are saying but if distributing oil via the internal oil pump doesn't coat the cylinder walls, then you would have to fog after every use. If the suggestion is to fog the engine if it is not going to be used for a month or two, than I would assume the engine oil will stay on the cylinder walls for that amount of time. I think the reason to fog is so you could do it and forget it (as was said above), but I think if you were to turn it over once per month, you would still maintain an oil coating.

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