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Wakesetter67

Loading my bu question?

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Wakesetter67

Ok Just for the record...I have been lanching and loading boats since I was 16, that's about 31 years, I used to pride myself on the 30 sec load if that, Leaving on lookers in awe. I know alot of you share that same skill!! But I would have to say I feel like a rookie. I have a buddy back the trailer down, fenders just slightly underwater and proceed to drive it on, I get to the wench and sinch it up, Here comes the issue, when we pull out the back will not track and more times then not the rail of the hull rest on the bunk. I was told not to let that happen so down again into the water to adjust. (ROOKIE) I know they are all thinking it, So what am I doing wrong. My Sanger was a piece of cake. Have I lost my edge:(

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ryanbush
Ok Just for the record...I have been lanching and loading boats since I was 16, that's about 31 years, I used to pride myself on the 30 sec load if that, Leaving on lookers in awe. I know alot of you share that same skill!! But I would have to say I feel like a rookie. I have a buddy back the trailer down, fenders just slightly underwater and proceed to drive it on, I get to the wench and sinch it up, Here comes the issue, when we pull out the back will not track and more times then not the rail of the hull rest on the bunk. I was told not to let that happen so down again into the water to adjust. (ROOKIE) I know they are all thinking it, So what am I doing wrong. My Sanger was a piece of cake. Have I lost my edge:(

mine does the exact same thing 9 times out of 10, what i do is just make sure after i hook up the tow strap that my driver backs in a little more (as long as its not windy) this lets the boat float free of the bunks, then pull it out very slowly, this will allow the boat to settle down on the trailer where it needs to be. if that doesn't work don't sweat it, the boat will settle where it is supposed to ride with in just a couple of miles going down the road

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Wakesetter67

Great so it's not just me!! I will try that on the next outing. So it will settle it's self on the way home?

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ryanbush
Great so it's not just me!! I will try that on the next outing. So it will settle it's self on the way home?

there is a little gas station that is at the most 2 miles from our ramp, i always stop there and get a snack and double check everything, mine is always straight by the time i get here, i don't even worry about trying to get it on straight anymore

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Wakesetter67

I will give it a try, Thanks!

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Lance B. Johnson

We were having this issue all the time also. We started centering the rudder (2 full turns from the left) this worked, but then we stopped putting the trailer in to deep and now we don't have a problem any more.

Edited by ruffdawg

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Bobby Light
Ok Just for the record...I have been lanching and loading boats since I was 16, that's about 31 years, I used to pride myself on the 30 sec load if that, Leaving on lookers in awe. I know alot of you share that same skill!! But I would have to say I feel like a rookie. I have a buddy back the trailer down, fenders just slightly underwater and proceed to drive it on, I get to the wench and sinch it up, Here comes the issue, when we pull out the back will not track and more times then not the rail of the hull rest on the bunk. I was told not to let that happen so down again into the water to adjust. (ROOKIE) I know they are all thinking it, So what am I doing wrong. My Sanger was a piece of cake. Have I lost my edge:(

Just pull out very slowly and try to have the boat between the guide on pads when pulling forward. It's not an exact science but you'll get the hang of it. It will center itself by the time you're a mile down the road. Just don't cinch your transom tie down all the way tight on the other side (you are using tie down straps right)?

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Coach of 3

Depending on the angle of the ramp I usually leave the tops of the fenders exposed. If you drive the boat up on the trailer, the trailer will center the boat. If you hope it settles in the right place when the driver slowly pulls out it is completely up to chance, too many variables, wind, was the trailer in straight, more bodies on one side, current... Make it easy on the boat driver and don't put the trailer in so deep. This has kept my wife happy.

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WakingMeHappy

Mine does this from time to time. I just stay connected to the trailer and back into the water. When I pull back up the ramp it’s usually centered properly. I wouldn’t want to try driving and assume the road bounce will center it for me. I just want it right before I drive.

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NorCaliBu
...Have I lost my edge :(

Yes.gif

:lol:Tease2.gif

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Chia
Depending on the angle of the ramp I usually leave the tops of the fenders exposed. If you drive the boat up on the trailer, the trailer will center the boat. If you hope it settles in the right place when the driver slowly pulls out it is completely up to chance, too many variables, wind, was the trailer in straight, more bodies on one side, current... Make it easy on the boat driver and don't put the trailer in so deep. This has kept my wife happy.

Plus1.gif Don't put the trailer in so far and power up to the bow roller. The tops of the fenders should be exposed.

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Ache For Wake
Depending on the angle of the ramp I usually leave the tops of the fenders exposed. If you drive the boat up on the trailer, the trailer will center the boat. If you hope it settles in the right place when the driver slowly pulls out it is completely up to chance, too many variables, wind, was the trailer in straight, more bodies on one side, current... Make it easy on the boat driver and don't put the trailer in so deep. This has kept my wife happy.

Plus1.gif Don't put the trailer in so far and power up to the bow roller. The tops of the fenders should be exposed.

People "power loading" thier boat is what ruins boat ramps. It erodes the lake/river bottom at the end of the concrete and can eventually create problems with the concrete. It also can create a ridge, or sand bar straight out from the ramp which generally isn't a great place for a sand bar. If a person is truely a ramp veteran, they should be able to back, or have their trailer backed, into the proper depth to load the boat without having to power load thus saving the ramp and maybe even someones prop.

If you sinch up the bow and then pull out slow, with practice you can almost always get the boat centered between the guides on the first try.

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Bobby Light
Depending on the angle of the ramp I usually leave the tops of the fenders exposed. If you drive the boat up on the trailer, the trailer will center the boat. If you hope it settles in the right place when the driver slowly pulls out it is completely up to chance, too many variables, wind, was the trailer in straight, more bodies on one side, current... Make it easy on the boat driver and don't put the trailer in so deep. This has kept my wife happy.

Plus1.gif Don't put the trailer in so far and power up to the bow roller. The tops of the fenders should be exposed.

People "power loading" thier boat is what ruins boat ramps. It erodes the lake/river bottom at the end of the concrete and can eventually create problems with the concrete. It also can create a ridge, or sand bar straight out from the ramp which generally isn't a great place for a sand bar. If a person is truely a ramp veteran, they should be able to back, or have their trailer backed, into the proper depth to load the boat without having to power load thus saving the ramp and maybe even someones prop.

If you sinch up the bow and then pull out slow, with practice you can almost always get the boat centered between the guides on the first try.

Plus1.gif I'm not scared to use the winch from time to time. I don't like power loading for many reasons.

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JDubya

This happens a lot with the new trailer because it floats (Aluminum). So here is what we do:

1. Back the trailer in and dip the bunks fully wet, then pull foward enough that you would have to winch the boat up to the bow stop (practice make sperfect to find the right depth)

2. I stay in the truck and have them drive the boat on until is snugs up on the bunks (we always idle onto the trailer...never power for reasons stated above, and where it stops is where it stays)

3. Have the boat driver get out and cinch the strap until it is snug

4. Then I back down slowly as they winch the boat up to the bow stop, giving just enough depth to allow them to winch up the boat.

The trick is to just back in enough to make it easy enough to winch it up but keep it shallow enough to not float the rear off the bunks. Usually if you are having this problem your trailer is too deep.

After a few times we have this down to an art and we are usually faster than most other people. We always stop once the boat is completely out of the water on the ramp breifly to check that it is centered, if not we just back it in again. Another trick is the have your weight as balanced as possible when you pull out of the water and do it gradually. It could also be that your ramp is slanted to one side. If this is the cases have some bodies on the deeper side and it should center just fine.

Hope this helps.

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Wakesetter67

Great news!! I have achieved my Pro status again, Took it out tonight at the river ( Current included) and did what eveyone suggested and a perfect load. Thanks to all who gave advice!!

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InvisibleMask

I was told by the dealer to power load or you can damage the prop. The reason is you are putting the trailer in too deep so it won't line up right when you pull out. At the same time the prop may hit something and your trailer bumpers are useless if you go too deep with the trailer. The trailer bumpers should always be near the rubrail on the boat, not below them. Thats how you know if its too deep or not.

I powerload every time. Get on and off in 30 seconds and just about have my wakeboard on before the guys back at the dock are done yelling at their wives to back up more and finally get their boat in the water.

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Baddog

If available I have a buddy walk a breast the boat as I pull it out to guide the boat on center that last few feet out of the water.

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Soon2BV

I back in to totally dip the bunks, then pull forward to where the fronts of the fenders are just above the water.

Boat glides on and then a just a little power for the last few inches while i tighten the winch.

On a steeper ramp i have found it is actually a little easier - drive on, connect the winch, and then let the boat settle as you pull forward. The key is keeping the people (weight) in the boat evenly distributed.

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wakedv

My first trip out this past summer this guy loading his Crownline powered up onto his trailer, then its my turn to load. I idle in towards the trailer, just about to put into neutral, and then hear that dreaded ting..ting. Pulled out and look, 3 of 4 blades damaged, waded out into the water and sure enough, Mr. Crownline dug a nice 2 foot hole and some nice rocks piled up behind it Ranting.gif Good thing he was already gone, I was not of sound mind!

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mellen_mpz

we always pullout of the water and the guy on the back of the boat gives a thumbs up or down wether its on the bunks or not. If it missed, we back er' in and try again. I cant help but think its eventually gonna damage a bunk when the boat is crooked while driving down the highway.

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WakingMeHappy
If available I have a buddy walk a breast the boat as I pull it out to guide the boat on center that last few feet out of the water.

I had a comment but it’s probably better just to let this one go. Biggrin.gif

Edited by WakingMeHappy

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Wakesetter67

Just so I understand, are you saying driving the boat onto the trailer is bad for the ramp, What exactly is power loading?

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Soon2BV

power loading when you have the trailer only partially in the water, and then drive the boat up onto it.

It take a lot of power to push the boat up onto the binks all the way to the front roller.

Using this much power can really push water (and rocks and debris) out and away fron the back of the boat where the prop is.

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Baddog
If available I have a buddy walk a breast the boat as I pull it out to guide the boat on center that last few feet out of the water.

I had a comment but it’s probably better just to let this one go. Biggrin.gif

You just don't know my buddies.

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VLX04

Got It, I drive almost all the way on to the trailer not Much power just enough to get close.

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