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Baddog

I Can't Get Up On The Skinny Ski

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Baddog

I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

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Shine
I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

What's happening while you are trying to get up? Losing the rope? tip going under? falling off to the side?

Are you using a double boot set up or rear toe plate? If your skinny stick is RTP just get up doubles and drop Bertha...

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HRemington

if you can't get up on one it might not quite yet be time for the next level, but the next step I would make would be the O'Brien Synchro. It is a terrific intermediate ski, course-capable if you are, but great in open water. It allows you to transition to the next level without getting too frustrated.

...but as asked above, give us some symptoms and we'll try to get you up. If you have one, you might want to practice getting up a number of times with the ski using a barefoot boom, just to begin getting a feel for it. I start all my newbie slalomers on it...great training tool.

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68Slalom
I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

What size is your ski and how much do you weigh?

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ed obermeier
I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

What size is your ski and how much do you weigh?

And what speeds are you going/wanting to go? The suggestion for the Obrien Syncro is a good one; the Radar Theory is another good one with one advantage. Unlike any other wide ride I've course skied on (I've ridden most of them), the Theory skis just like a regular ski but at slower speeds. Most wide rides require you to run them differently in the slalom course (basically pull all the way to the ball, crank off turn, repeat). The Theory preturns, casts out, and turns just like a regular slalom ski does. I don't have to change how I ski on my MPD when I get off the Theory, they require the same exact style.

Just recently returned to the course after rotor cuff surgerty in February, 6th time out on a ski at all I ran 3 @ 35 off 30 mph on my Theory. Ran easy 22 offs at 32 mph too. But if you just want to putt around on it you can do that too. Easy to get up on, less tiring to ride, all the attributes of any good wide ride plus it has a gas pedal if you wanna rip. Highly recommended.

Ed

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Baddog

I'm not a newbie slalomer, just newbie on the skinny skies. All 3 of my skis have the RTP. I only have the option of deep water starting since I don't have access to any shore legally. Left foot forward, and on Bertha I have my back foot in place and am skiing by the time I hit the prop wash.

On the skinny skis I have gotten up on two and then drop one right away, but that's not the way to do it and I know that. Key problems are:

1. Trouble keeping the tip high enough out of the water

2. Drowning while trying to get on top of the water

3. Can't seem to hold on long enough to get onto the water

4. Not sure of the speed at start. Tried slow then faster, fast and slow = no go.

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Baddog

I have a 67" Phantom Truth and a 68" (I think) O'Brien. For the life of me I can't recall which model.

I ski 15 off at 32 and can easily make 1 ball, as long as I don't have to actually go all the way around it.

Weight? Depends. Is that with or without that really heavy bathing suit and the lead lined vest? What about before or after the morning constitutional? Bottom line = 185-190.

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jojano

This handle is a great way to help any slalom skier that may be having issues with getting out of the water. Never go any where with out it. It keeps there ski straight until you are up. I call it an easy up ski handle. some call it other.

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/de...1009&r=view

good luck

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davemac
This handle is a great way to help any slalom skier that may be having issues with getting out of the water. Never go any where with out it. It keeps there ski straight until you are up. I call it an easy up ski handle. some call it other.

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/de...1009&r=view

good luck

Plus1.gif

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Baddog
This handle is a great way to help any slalom skier that may be having issues with getting out of the water. Never go any where with out it. It keeps there ski straight until you are up. I call it an easy up ski handle. some call it other.

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/de...1009&r=view

good luck

Thanks for the suggestion on the handle but keeping the ski straight isn't a issue for me. I think the primary problem is holding on long enough while holding my breath because I am being drowned by the wall 'o water in the transition phase from in-the-water-moving to on-top-of-the-water moving fast. I don't have this problem with the shaped ski because it is so wide and keeps the spray off of me. Also, becasue of the surface area I pop on top of the water very quickly.

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Pondking
I'm not a newbie slalomer, just newbie on the skinny skies. All 3 of my skis have the RTP. I only have the option of deep water starting since I don't have access to any shore legally. Left foot forward, and on Bertha I have my back foot in place and am skiing by the time I hit the prop wash.

On the skinny skis I have gotten up on two and then drop one right away, but that's not the way to do it and I know that. Key problems are:

1. Trouble keeping the tip high enough out of the water

2. Drowning while trying to get on top of the water

3. Can't seem to hold on long enough to get onto the water

4. Not sure of the speed at start. Tried slow then faster, fast and slow = no go.

Skis should be fine for your weight without really heavy bathing suit.

Do you have a tower or boom could be useful for a couple of tries till you get the hang of it on the skinnyer ski.

Focus on this:

Shoulders back, Chest out.

Front knee right tight into chest and butt back.

In this position ski tip should be well up out of water.

Have driver put boat in gear and give you a short drag. If you are in the right position every thing will remain stable.

On the hit make sure you keep your chin high and chest out (look up to where the rope would attach to tower or drivers mirror) and don't straighten your leg 'till you start to plain. I know this may sound remedial but maybe some lazy habits formed while using the fat boy.

Driver gives a smooth but firm advance to throttle to about 3/4 (depending on boat load) and then back it off as you come out of the water. Will need a somewhat stronger hit than on fat boy. Driver is half the trick.

You'll nail it no sweat. Let us know how it goes.

Good Luck

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ucontrol
I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

I have been single, slalom, skiing for years. What you have to remember is that the sooner you can get the front of your ski level, the quicker it will plane. It sounds like you are actually plowing the front of the ski thru the water. That might be why it is so hard for you to get up. I do not know if you are using double rap boots or not. BUT I always try and teach my beginners to drag the rear foot or at least place it lightly in the rear toe with as little weight on the back as possible. As you come up, you can extend your rear leg behind you and keep your arms straight. You are now able to lean your shoulders foward and your arms straight to push the front of the ski down to a level position. As you gain speed, you can slip your rear foot all the way into the back boot and start to enjoy your ride. Of course this method only works with an open toe in the back.

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JeffS

I'm particularly big - 6'2" 235#.

I can't get up on a real stick either any more. That's not what you were looking for I know...but it's good for me to read this thread.

So thank you. :-)

I used to ski a Sychro - up until about 220# and 4 years ago. I was in pretty good shape at that weight.

Now I'm less fit, less strong and lugging another 15pounds.

So my solution - Big Daddy. Pathetic - I know. But I'm still behind the boat - even on the downhill slide to 50!!!

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lbow

I usually shorten the rope way up on people when they are having trouble. To me it seems way easier to get up at 32' off than at 15' off. If you do that and get up please be careful though.

I also seem to notice that it requires much more effort and time for me to get out of the water if i let my hands get near the tip of the ski. If i notice it i try to keep my hands down by me feet.

edit - i also believe slower is "easier" on the body. I'm 6'2" 200 lbs.

Edited by lbow

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Baddog
I have skied nearly my whole life and on slalom for most of that. The early years were on my wooden ski that had a medium width to it and a slight tunnel on the base. 4 or 5 years ago I purchased an HO shaped ski that I affectionately call "Big Bertha" and have found it to be the easiest slalom ski in the world to get up on, because it is so wide in the front. I have since wanted to crank up my skill level and learn how to ski the course and I know I can never turn quick enough on Bertha.

I have one O'brien and one HO skinny ski and I just can't get up on the darned things. Looking for any and all advice to help me to the next level.

I have been single, slalom, skiing for years. What you have to remember is that the sooner you can get the front of your ski level, the quicker it will plane. It sounds like you are actually plowing the front of the ski thru the water. That might be why it is so hard for you to get up. I do not know if you are using double rap boots or not. BUT I always try and teach my beginners to drag the rear foot or at least place it lightly in the rear toe with as little weight on the back as possible. As you come up, you can extend your rear leg behind you and keep your arms straight. You are now able to lean your shoulders foward and your arms straight to push the front of the ski down to a level position. As you gain speed, you can slip your rear foot all the way into the back boot and start to enjoy your ride. Of course this method only works with an open toe in the back.

These sound like great pointers and I can't wait to give 'em a go. However, that will have to wait until next weekend as I am stuck in Bowling Green, KY working on a project install.

Keep other ideas coming, and thanks.

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Chia

i have seen wakeboarders start by standing on the board completely under the water and aiming it toward the surface on the pull. It looks easy...

Would that work for a water ski?

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bobofthenorth

Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

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Baddog
Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

Or get on a friggin diet. THAT might help with my floatation thing as well. I know. I'll start tomorrow.

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68Slalom
Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

Or get on a friggin diet. THAT might help with my floatation thing as well. I know. I'll start tomorrow.

I don't think your weight is the factor, it's form deep water starts with the type and size of ski for you will be a little more difficult and you will drag more. We are probably very close in set up, I have a 69" HO truth and weigh 190. Coming from a CDX there is a big difference in starts, I think you mentioned that you have your left foot forward. What side is the rope on?

Edited by 68Slalom

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bobofthenorth
Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

Or get on a friggin diet. THAT might help with my floatation thing as well. I know. I'll start tomorrow.

WHOA - that wasn't where I was going at all.

I float like a brick. If I wear a slim form fitting jacket I barely float and I have the perfect devil of a time keeping any ski out of the water. That in turn makes my starts really hard. If I wear a jacket that floats me higher it makes a huge difference.

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Baddog
Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

Or get on a friggin diet. THAT might help with my floatation thing as well. I know. I'll start tomorrow.

I don't think your weight is the factor, it's form deep water starts with the type and size of ski for you will be a little more difficult and you will drag more. We are probably very close in set up, I have a 69" HO truth and weigh 190. Coming from a CDX there is a big difference in starts, I think you mentioned that you have your left foot forward. What side is the rope on?

Rope is on the right side.

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Baddog
Try a lifejacket with more flotation. That will let you start with more ski out of the water.

Or get on a friggin diet. THAT might help with my floatation thing as well. I know. I'll start tomorrow.

WHOA - that wasn't where I was going at all.

I float like a brick. If I wear a slim form fitting jacket I barely float and I have the perfect devil of a time keeping any ski out of the water. That in turn makes my starts really hard. If I wear a jacket that floats me higher it makes a huge difference.

Bob,

I know you weren't attcking my weight, but I was. One of these days I have got to get serious about loosing it again. I will look for a higher floatation vest although mine seems to do a decent job. I might try adding my shorty as that seems to add a bit of buoyancy.

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Wayne

I have difficulties at the beginning of the year when wearing a long wetsuit. I can't get my legs to compress into my chest enough so it's a real struggle to get up. As others have said you're plowing the water and not getting the ski on plane. Usually this is from being used to the wider ski so you are used to putting more pressure or straightening you back leg sooner. The wider ski has more "lift" at the tail end and this kind of self corrects your form.

Pointers:

- The knee from your leading leg should be all the way to your chest

- Point the ski at the boat as much as possible

- Try to remember to keep pressure off your back foot (I actually pull my back foot up on a deep water start, sometimes I just about pull my foot out of my Animals)

- The above point also means keep that rear leg bent so the ski stays pointed

Something else I picked up was to put my chin into my chest as I get pulled out. That seems to keep the wall of spray comming off the ski out of my knose and I don't feel like I'm being drowned. I usually do this at the early part of the year when I'm struggling with the lack of mobility and weight of a wetsuit. The water falls on the back of your head and usually you're clear of the surface so you can breathe.

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gripnrip

I've been having problems getting up this year as I dislocated my shoulder last year so I'm really favoring my good shoulder. While at Ski Paradise earlier this year I was told to act as if you are standing on broken glass, the next is keep your knees bent and don't, don't try to stand up to fast. When I do this I come up easier and quickers.. My 2 cents

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Sixball

Try asking the driver to go to 1/3 to 1/2 throttle for 2 or 3 seconds then smoothly add to full throttle till you come up then throttle back to speed.

Keep your knees bent and pulled to chest.

have 6 to 8 inches of ski out of the water.

Keep your weight back.

Push your toes down. This will start you to a plain without forcing a wall of water up.

As you come on plain start standing. Do not stand early.

I bet I am older fatter and on a 67" stick. If you are starting with your rear foot in the RTP don't change. If you get it right you will come right up.

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