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Series versus Parallel circuit


Tedro

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Does anyone know if the cabin interior lights on Malibu's are wired in parallel or in series?

I would guess in parallel because one loss of a light does not kill all the interior lights (I would guess because I have not removed a bulb yet).

More specifically on a 08 vRide?

Thanks.

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And the whether the bulb is in or out has nothing to do with it.

In a series circuit , the current through each of the components is the same, and the voltage across the components is the sum of the voltages across all the components. In a parallel circuit, the voltage across each of the components is the same, and the total current is the sum of the currents through all the components.

As an example, consider a very simple circuit consisting of four light bulbs and one 6 V battery. If a wire joins the battery to one bulb, to the next bulb, to the next bulb, to the next bulb, then back to the battery, in one continuous loop, the bulbs are said to be in series. If each bulb is wired to the battery in a separate loop, the bulbs are said to be in parallel. If the four light bulbs are connected in series, the same current flows through all of them, and the voltage drop is 1.5 V across each bulb. If the light bulbs are connected in parallel, the current flowing through the light bulbs combine to form the current flowing in the battery, while the voltage drop is 6 V across each bulb.

In a series circuit, every device must function for the circuit to be complete. One bulb burning out in a series circuit kills the circuit. In parallel circuits, each light has its own circuit, so all but one light could be burned out, and the last one will still function.

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Right, sorry I was just referring to the fact that it is a parallel & that on many boats that I've seen the wiring is daisy-chained. Even at that though, the bulb doesn't have anything to do with the completion of the circuit.

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