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Let's renew an "Oldie but Goodie"


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Let me start this topic by saying Wakegirl started it a few years ago but the responses have slowed down. Now that fiberglass is more prominent I figured responses would be even more skewed and was interested and wanted to bring this back to the forefront.

My two pennies:

I always thought I would buy a fiberglass platform but when it came down to actually buying a boat, that was the furthest thing from my mind, especially since I was in the used market. I ended up with a teak and it had never been touched (as far as maintenance) in 3 years. I sanded and oiled and sanded and oiled etc. etc.... and now I have a beautiful piece of wood.

I don't think there will ever be a definitive answer, for me, it will pass the time during the offseason to spend a couple afternoons sanding and oiling the teak. And the same once in July or August sometime.

Many people a few years ago voted for the teak, I see that being less currently.

What are your opinions???!!!

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I prefer teak. The maintenance doesn't take that long. A once a year sanding and a good oiling after each use. Besides, it gives me that time quiet I need with my Bu.... just to talk and reflect on the good times. Like the time when I sold my Sea Ray and bought my Bu. Man, that was a good day!

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I have teak. Hate it. Looks good when it's all finished. But my boat sits in the sun & water more than it does in the garage. And the teak just doesn't handle it well at all.

My winter project is to replace it, cover it, or make it maintenance free.

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Teak definitely is used less especially with wakeboard boats. Also a lot of people want the swim platform to match their boat. I ordered my 2003 Bu and a fiberglass platform was more than teak, kind of rubbed me wrong. I think 2003 was the first year for Bu fiberglass platforms.

Also I think teak really distinquishes a ski boat from a run about.

On the other hand there's a lot to be said about low/no maintenance. I can see this is an earth shattering post ... nothing that hasn't been said many times b4.

Here's a pic of my platform after I refinished it with Teak Guard this fall and it'll look this nice all season. I keep the boat on a lift and the a$$ of the boat faces south so the platform gets lots of sun.

post-371-1228304513_thumb.jpg

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I had fiberglass on my first boat, loved it. Second boat had a teak platform, while I did like the look it was a PITA to take care of. It only looked good for the first few days after you sanded and oiled it.

Ordered the VRide with a fiberglass platform, no turning back now. :)

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I am shocked at what I'm hearing. Still a large number of teak supporters. I never thought about it but I agree, the teak really distinguishes an inboard from an I/O.

I actually sanded and oiled and sanded and oiled and etc etc. all of this work in my garage over the course of a few evenings. My teak oil directions say to leave the wood in the sun for a day in between coats. I skipped that step but when I did sit it out in the sun for just an hour it definitely faded. I hope I don't have to oil every trip out like wakingmehappy suggested.

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Teak definitely is used less especially with wakeboard boats. Also a lot of people want the swim platform to match their boat. I ordered my 2003 Bu and a fiberglass platform was more than teak, kind of rubbed me wrong. I think 2003 was the first year for Bu fiberglass platforms.

Also I think teak really distinquishes a ski boat from a run about.

On the other hand there's a lot to be said about low/no maintenance. I can see this is an earth shattering post ... nothing that hasn't been said many times b4.

Here's a pic of my platform after I refinished it with Teak Guard this fall and it'll look this nice all season. I keep the boat on a lift and the a$$ of the boat faces south so the platform gets lots of sun.

Teak Guard?? Where is this avaliable and how much? I have teak and love the look but the day of sanding and oiling at the end of the year was a bit more than I budgeted for

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I have had a teak step before and i don't understand why anyone would still want a teak step. Fiber glass is the way to go, low maintenance and looks incredible. With the fiberglass step I recommend making sure the surface on the step is one that you think would be most comfortable. The surfaces they put on some of the steps are questionable.

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Teak definitely is used less especially with wakeboard boats. Also a lot of people want the swim platform to match their boat. I ordered my 2003 Bu and a fiberglass platform was more than teak, kind of rubbed me wrong. I think 2003 was the first year for Bu fiberglass platforms.

Also I think teak really distinquishes a ski boat from a run about.

On the other hand there's a lot to be said about low/no maintenance. I can see this is an earth shattering post ... nothing that hasn't been said many times b4.

Here's a pic of my platform after I refinished it with Teak Guard this fall and it'll look this nice all season. I keep the boat on a lift and the a$$ of the boat faces south so the platform gets lots of sun.

Teak Guard?? Where is this avaliable and how much? I have teak and love the look but the day of sanding and oiling at the end of the year was a bit more than I budgeted for

http://www.teakguard.com

Jim

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Personally, I can't stand teak. Fiberglass all the way. I think it fits the wakesetters better, however slalom boats suit well for teak.

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I have teak. Hate it. Looks good when it's all finished. But my boat sits in the sun & water more than it does in the garage. And the teak just doesn't handle it well at all.

My winter project is to replace it, cover it, or make it maintenance free.

Bill,

We use the platform when putting on the Skyski. I like the fact that the edge of the teak platform doesn't damage the leading edge of the foil T bar. I think the hard edge of the fiberglass platform would cause damage. That is why I like my teak. Rub a little oil on it occasionally and it stays decent all summer for me. It does get a worn look where ski slides in it but it's worth the maintenence to me to protect the foil. I have seen some people add padding to the fiberglass rubrail to prvent foil damage. That looks bad to me with padding hanging off your platform. Do you load on your platform?

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I have teak. Hate it. Looks good when it's all finished. But my boat sits in the sun & water more than it does in the garage. And the teak just doesn't handle it well at all.

My winter project is to replace it, cover it, or make it maintenance free.

Bill,

We use the platform when putting on the Skyski. I like the fact that the edge of the teak platform doesn't damage the leading edge of the foil T bar. I think the hard edge of the fiberglass platform would cause damage. That is why I like my teak. Rub a little oil on it occasionally and it stays decent all summer for me. It does get a worn look where ski slides in it but it's worth the maintenence to me to protect the foil. I have seen some people add padding to the fiberglass rubrail to prvent foil damage. That looks bad to me with padding hanging off your platform. Do you load on your platform?

Yea, we load off the swimstep too. It's all the worn spots that make it look like hell on mine. Looks great as long as it stays wet. But when it dries out, it looks like a bleached old coffee table hanging off the back of a $40k fiberglass boat.

I had a fiberglass swimstep on my 205. It had rubrail on it, just like the other 46' of rubrail around the rest of the boat, and Traxx on top. We never had problems chipping or scratching it. Looked great wet or dry & never had to sand it or oil it.

I'm on my 2nd teak swimstep. If I followed the maintenance schedule several people here have listed, the teak would look great about 3 or 4 weeks out of the year. And be all scratched up, faded & bleached the other 30 or 40 weeks of the season. And a couple of weeks a year it would be slicker than hell & track oil inside the boat if it's not done perfectly right.

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I have teak. Hate it. Looks good when it's all finished. But my boat sits in the sun & water more than it does in the garage. And the teak just doesn't handle it well at all.

My winter project is to replace it, cover it, or make it maintenance free.

Bill,

We use the platform when putting on the Skyski. I like the fact that the edge of the teak platform doesn't damage the leading edge of the foil T bar. I think the hard edge of the fiberglass platform would cause damage. That is why I like my teak. Rub a little oil on it occasionally and it stays decent all summer for me. It does get a worn look where ski slides in it but it's worth the maintenence to me to protect the foil. I have seen some people add padding to the fiberglass rubrail to prvent foil damage. That looks bad to me with padding hanging off your platform. Do you load on your platform?

Yea, we load off the swimstep too. It's all the worn spots that make it look like hell on mine. Looks great as long as it stays wet. But when it dries out, it looks like a bleached old coffee table hanging off the back of a $40k fiberglass boat.

I had a fiberglass swimstep on my 205. It had rubrail on it, just like the other 46' of rubrail around the rest of the boat, and Traxx on top. We never had problems chipping or scratching it. Looked great wet or dry & never had to sand it or oil it.

I'm on my 2nd teak swimstep. If I followed the maintenance schedule several people here have listed, the teak would look great about 3 or 4 weeks out of the year. And be all scratched up, faded & bleached the other 30 or 40 weeks of the season. And a couple of weeks a year it would be slicker than hell & track oil inside the boat if it's not done perfectly right.

That sounds like my teak swimstep. My dog loves to swim around the boat and her claws scratch the hell out of the teak. I oil it often, but it still looks dried out quickly.

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Also I think teak really distinquishes a ski boat from a run about.

Great. So your $60k Malibu looks like a $12k Bluewater? Thats cool. Whistling.gif

Bill, call me old school if you would like. Heck, call me old if you would like to. I have no idea what a Bluewater is, though I'm very happy how my Bu functions, how it looks and it gets lots of compliments on my boat. The teak is beautiful. I love natural things like stone (use it in my landscaping) and wood. In my fixer upper lake house I replaced all the windows and doors in my house and replaced the painted molding with stained wood. Did the same with the molding/baseboard along the flooring I replaced. Ripped out my yucky painted kitchen cabinets and replaced with a light natural cherry. Ok, I'm babbling.

Similar debate going on with closed vs open bow ski boats, it's whatever you want. Each have their advantages and disadvantages as far as function and looks.

Below sums it up:

"Whatever floats your boat".

Edited by MalibuNation
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I would never buy a boat with a teak platform.. it looks old, out of date, pain to look after, and just horrible.. In oz I dont know the exact figures, but I hardly see any teak..

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For a wakeboard boat its fiberglass all the way. I think the glass on a wakeboard boat continues that cohesive look all around the boat and looks really updated and aggressive.

Now on other boats like cruisers, yachts, etc I do like the classy look of teak on deck.

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Also I think teak really distinquishes a ski boat from a run about.

Great. So your $60k Malibu looks like a $12k Bluewater? Thats cool. Whistling.gif

Bill, call me old school if you would like. Heck, call me old if you would like to. I have no idea what a Bluewater is, though I'm very happy how my Bu functions, how it looks and it gets lots of compliments on my boat. The teak is beautiful. I love natural things like stone (use it in my landscaping) and wood. In my fixer upper lake house I replaced all the windows and doors in my house and replaced the painted molding with stained wood. Did the same with the molding/baseboard along the flooring I replaced. Ripped out my yucky painted kitchen cabinets and replaced with a light natural cherry. Ok, I'm babbling.

Similar debate going on with closed vs open bow ski boats, it's whatever you want. Each have their advantages and disadvantages as far as function and looks.

Below sums it up:

"Whatever floats your boat".

Bluewater is an old boat manufacturer out of Oregon/Nor Cal who makes I/Os with teak swimsteps.

I appreciate the look & feel of natural things too, especially when your talking about furniture or landscaping. But when it comes to boats, I'm not a fan of the look & feel of teak on a boat.

More power to ya if your into it though.

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