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winterizing the 2008 monsoon 340


onebadone50

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I have an o8 wakesetter w/ the monsoon 340. I wanted to winterize the boat myself, but felt that so much of the info out there was for the older boats. Though I got a ton of great information from this site, (especially from pistol Pete, who actually took the time to send twice to me) I still felt unsure about what lines to remove to drain the water. I have put together an attachment w/ the lines I pulled, and pictures(which aren't good) for the bucrew to go over and give input. I am hoping to post this for others to use when completed. I may have gone either overboard, or missed steps so please give your input.

This is pretty much just the last step to winterizing. This does not include

oil change

fogging

fuel treatment

Here is the process that I took to drain the water out of the 2008 monsoon 340

I removed hose from elbow on top of intake manifold.

post-7394-1224465971_thumb.jpg

I separated the quick release that connects to each exhaust manifold (pic 2)

post-7394-1224466031_thumb.jpg

This line is as you can see in pic 3 is off the tranny. I had this line off due to operating the motor for oil change. This is where I ran the water hose into. This line runs clear up to the impeller pump I made sure this line was clear of any water.

post-7394-1224466195_thumb.jpg

This line is off the bottom of the water pump. I removed that line.

Pic 5 is the line off the bottom of the tranny cooler I also removed this, and the other end that goes to the impeller pump so that I could get all the water out of the line.

Once all these lines were removed I pulled both the copper sensor mounts out of the block, and let all the water drain from the block.

When this was done I went back to the line on top of the intake manifold (pic1) and blew air through, and made sure all water was out of line. This water came out of the line I pulled from the tranny cooler. (pic 5)

Edited by onebadone50
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I still prefer to drain the water then fill again with RV anitfreeze while running warm then drain again. But as long as you had the t-stat open after it warmed up you should be fine.

As well there should be some water drain plugs in the tranny mine has two.

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I actually got the boat up to temp to change the oil, But it took so long to drain that the thermostat couldnt have still been open anyways! Its sounds like that could be a problem?

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I hope you blew air through picture number 1. And then filled with antifreeze and blew it through. Otherwise your heater core will crack over the winter.

-Chris

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  • 11 years later...

If I get the engine up to temp and turn on the heater. (160 Deg F).  Can I just use the fake a lake and pump in the antifreeze until I see it come out of the exhaust?

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4 hours ago, RIchG said:

If I get the engine up to temp and turn on the heater. (160 Deg F).  Can I just use the fake a lake and pump in the antifreeze until I see it come out of the exhaust?

Then you will have a tiny bit of antifreeze in the block and heater with no way to know how much. The proper procedure is drain everything and they run antifreeze in it. 

  • Like 2
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  • 11 months later...

I wish the answer to the winterizing question was easy. I have read every post and watched every video. It's amazing that there is no consensus about what is the correct procedure. The manual says to just drain the water. There are many posts about just doing that. Then there are many posts about adding antifreeze after draining all the water.

I really wish I could figure this out.

I want to add RV antifreeze after draining the engine and heater because I'm scared out of my mind that I won't get all the water out. My boat was always winterized by my mechanic with antifreeze. He used a whole capture and recycle setup. I've moved and can't get it done by a professional.

Videos show adding the antifreeze to the water intake tube, just like running the engine with garden hose in the same tube.

Sounds easy. Run the engine with the antifreeze going in. Watch for antifreeze to leave the exhaust. Done.

But...... will it go everywhere? Running the engine to operating temp allows the thermostat to open. If you take too long draining the engine and heater, will the thermostat still be open? If not, it won't go everywhere and adding it will be for nothing. I'm more worried about the heater.

I'm really confused.

Can someone shed light on this topic? I'm really sorry for asking. I know it's been beaten to death!

Thanks.

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You'll get several answers on this. I'm in the camp of not using antifreeze. Reason? Once you drain the water... what's left to freeze? If there is some water that doesn't drain out, it will not be enough to cause damage if it freezes. It's my understanding that guys use antifreeze to prevent corrosion. That's valid, but my 98 has never had antifreeze and is still going strong. 

You can use compressed air to make sure you get the water out of your heater.

Edited by BlindSquirrel
  • Like 2
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I drain all of the water out and add antifreeze:

  1. one manifold drain on each side
  2. one engine block drain on each side (when the water stops poke inside the drain hole with a wire to make sure it's not plugged)
  3. remove hose that attaches to the transmission cooler at the transmission cooler end and drain
  4. remove J hose that attaches to the engine block water pump at the water pump (lower end) and drain
  5. reattach everything
  6. remove J hose that attaches to the engine block water pump at the thermostat housing (upper end).  Fill hose with antifreeze until it comes out of the thermostat housing, then reattach.  I think it's 2.5 gallons of antifreeze total.

That's it.

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Antifreeze is optional, it just helps stop corrosion - especially in the heater(s)

I only use 2 gallons - more would fit.  After draining everything and blowing out the heater I fill the heater through the upper hose until I can hear it running into the circulation pump, then I just dump the remainder in the top hose that is connected to the circulation pump so that it fills the block up.

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I'm confused why you add the antifreeze manually instead of using the water intake hose while the motor is running.

Your method won't get to the heater, correct?

Thanks again for the help.

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1 minute ago, mnmarty said:

I'm confused why you add the antifreeze manually instead of using the water intake hose while the motor is running.

Your method won't get to the heater, correct?

Thanks again for the help.

You pour it into the heater lines with a funnel

There are a couple reasons I don't run it

1) it is a huge waste of antifreeze.  To fill the engine you are also going to puke gallons out the exhaust and at $13 a gallon for the -100 stuff - no thanks

2) I do it in the garage once it gets too cold to boat - running the boat isn't an option

3) If you have completely dried the system out you run a good shot of frying your impeller trying to dry prime it pulling out of a bucket

  • Like 1
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All good points. I was planning to pour it into the water intake line after it's disconnected to the brass intake fitting in the hull. I've seen that done on other videos. The Indmar manual also uses this intake tube to run the boat with a garden hose if not using a fake a lake.

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2 minutes ago, mnmarty said:

All good points. I was planning to pour it into the water intake line after it's disconnected to the brass intake fitting in the hull. I've seen that done on other videos. The Indmar manual also uses this intake tube to run the boat with a garden hose if not using a fake a lake.

Just remember that a garden hose has pressure - a hose siphoning from a bucket does not.

And I'm assuming you have never tried to disconnect that hose from the hull fitting ;)  

  • Like 1
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21 minutes ago, mnmarty said:

My bad, I meant remove the hose from the engine side, not the brass fitting.

It is just as hard to get that one off the vdrive, super thick hose.  If you wanted to disconnect one, use the one on the other side of the vdrive that goes to the pump.

But enough of this winterization nonsense - it was 82 when we were out yesterday ;)

Edited by oldjeep
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